Community Choice Project of the Month Vote for May 2014

The vote for May 2014 Community Choice SourceForge Project of the Month is now available, and will run until 2014-05-07 00:00 UTC:

Vote here for the Community Choice SourceForge Project of the Month for May 2014

The candidates (in random order) are as follows:

SleepyHead

Open-source, cross platform, sleep tracking software with a focus on monitoring CPAP treatment.

[ Download SleepyHead ]

FTLEditor

A 3rd-party tool to edit user files for the game FasterThanLight. With this, you can unlock any or all ships and achievements in your user profile, or tweak most aspects of saved games: crew, systems, weapons, fires, breaches, etc.

[ Download FTLEditor ]

The FreeType Project

The FreeType project develops free, portable and high-quality software solutions for digital typography. We focus on bringing small, efficient and ubiquitous products.

[ Download The FreeType Project ]

D-Fend Reloaded

D-Fend Reloaded is a graphical environment for DOSBox. D-Fend Reloaded is a successor of the discontinued D-Fend. Both environments look alike and D-Fend Reloaded contains all features of D-Fend. Even the D-Fend config files can be used.

[ Download D-Fend Reloaded ]

ApexDC++

ApexDC™ is an innovative DC++ client based on StrongDC++. It features external plugins and scripting through LUA and much more. Both operators and users alike should find ApexDC++ a pleasant experience.

[ Download ApexDC++ ]

NAS4Free

NAS4Free is an embedded Open Source Storage distribution and supports sharing across Windows, Apple, and UNIX-like systems. It includes ZFS, Software RAID (0,1,5), disk encryption, S.M.A.R.T / email reports etc. with following protocols: CIFS (samba), FTP, NFS, TFTP, AFP, RSYNC, Unison, iSCSI, UPnP, Bittorent (initiator and target), Bridge, CARP (Common Address Redundancy Protocol) and HAST (Highly Available Storage). All this can easy be setup by it’s highly configurable WEB interface. NAS4Free can be installed on Compact Flash/USB/SSD media, Hard disk or booted of from a LiveCD with a usb stick.

[ Download NAS4Free ]

JSToolNpp

A javascript plugin for Notepad++. Douglas Crockford’s JSMin algorithm to minimize javascript code. My own algorithm to format javascript code. A JSON data viewer. Really helpful to javascript coder on Notepad++ and really easy to use it.

[ Download JSToolNpp ]

PostInstallerF

PostInstallerF will install all the software that Fedora doesn’t include by default, after running Fedora for the first time. Its easy for a new user. PostInstallerF contains everything that you need for your daily computing.

[ Download PostInstallerF ]

devkitPro

This project is for homebrew console development tools based on the gnu compiler collection with additional tools and libraries to aid programming each supported console. The windows variants are built with MinGW.

[ Download devkitPro ]

Projects of the Week, April 21, 2014

Here’s the projects that we’re featuring this week on the front page of SourceForge.net:

AkelPad

A simple notepad-like text editor with many features. It is designed to be a small and fast.

[ Download AkelPad ]

packfilemanager

This is the Total War pack file manager project, starting from version 1.7. A short introduction into Warscape modding: http://www.twcenter.net/forums/showthread.php?620537-Warscape-Modding-Primer Join the PFM user group on Steam to receive update notifications: http://steamcommunity.com/groups/pfm_users

[ Download packfilemanager ]

^C
metalmark sfcomtools-code $ perl project_description -r -f ~/sourceforge/featured/featured_2014-04-21
Emgu CV

Emgu CV is a cross platform .Net wrapper to the OpenCV image processing library. Allowing OpenCV functions to be called from .NET compatible languages such as C#, VB, VC++, IronPython etc. The wrapper can be compiled in Mono and run on Windows, Linux, Mac OS X, iPhone, iPad and Android devices.

[ Download Emgu CV ]

NAS4Free

NAS4Free is an embedded Open Source Storage distribution and supports sharing across Windows, Apple, and UNIX-like systems. It includes ZFS, Software RAID (0,1,5), disk encryption, S.M.A.R.T / email reports etc. with following protocols: CIFS (samba), FTP, NFS, TFTP, AFP, RSYNC, Unison, iSCSI, UPnP, Bittorent (initiator and target), Bridge, CARP (Common Address Redundancy Protocol) and HAST (Highly Available Storage). All this can easy be setup by it’s highly configurable WEB interface. NAS4Free can be installed on Compact Flash/USB/SSD media, Hard disk or booted of from a LiveCD with a usb stick.

[ Download NAS4Free ]

phpList

phpList is the world’s most popular Open Source email campaign manager. With a powerful set of features, personalisation, segmentation, open and click metrics, throttling and an API. Download and install on your own server or get a free trial of the hosted version @ http://phplist.com/hosted Available in more than 20 translations, provided by the phpList community.

[ Download phpList ]

AkelPad

A simple notepad-like text editor with many features. It is designed to be a small and fast.

[ Download AkelPad ]

Diskless Remote Boot in Linux (DRBL)

DRBL provides diskless or systemless environment. It uses distributed hardware resources and makes it possible for clients to fully access local hardware. It also includes Clonezilla, a partition and disk cloning utility similar to Ghost.

[ Download Diskless Remote Boot in Linux (DRBL) ]

CoCEd

CoCed allows you to edit your saves from the game “Corruption of Champions”. You can edit your stats, items, perks, appearance and body. INSTALLATION: 1) Download and extract the files anywhere you want. No installation required. 2) WindowsXP users must install the Microsoft dotnet framework 4.0: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=17113 COMPATIBILITY * Requires at least Windows XP (which means it also work with Vista, Seven and W8 of course). * Not compatible with OSX and Linux, even with Wine and Mono. Sorry. HAVE A QUESTION? FOUND A BUG? WANT TO CONTRIBUTE? http://forum.fenoxo.com/thread-6324.html CONTRIBUTORS Perdev (creator) Bobbaganoosh TheMadExile

[ Download CoCEd ]

Wings 3D

Wings 3D is an advanced subdivision modeler that is both powerful and easy to use (inspired by Nendo and Mirai from Izware).

[ Download Wings 3D ]

packfilemanager

This is the Total War pack file manager project, starting from version 1.7. A short introduction into Warscape modding: http://www.twcenter.net/forums/showthread.php?620537-Warscape-Modding-Primer Join the PFM user group on Steam to receive update notifications: http://steamcommunity.com/groups/pfm_users

[ Download packfilemanager ]

MP4Joiner

MP4Joiner allows joining of multiple MP4 files into a single one without reencoding and without quality loss.

[ Download MP4Joiner ]

Apache OpenOffice hits the 100 Million Downloads Mark!

Apache OpenOffice 100 Million Mark logoThe Apache Software Foundation just announced 100 Million Downloads of Apache™ OpenOffice™.

We are thrilled to be part of this wonderful community, and glad to quote the statement of continued support by our General Manager, Gaurav Kuchhal.

By continuously improving Apache OpenOffice Extensions and Templates sites we show how committed we are about providing projects with what they need most,” said Gaurav Kuchhal, General Manager for Slashdot and SourceForge. “We are happy to help open source projects to grow, no matter where they are hosted or developed. We have been serving over 122 Million downloads for the Apache OpenOffice project, with daily peaks of about 250,000 and we are committed to providing products and services that demonstrate our dedication to technical excellence.

Read the full press-release at the Apache blog.

Apache OpenOffice Extensions Site Gets Social!

Apache OpenOffice Extensions logo

We’re excited to announce that we just released a new Apache OpenOffice Extensions website. This is the fourth time we improve Apache OpenOffice distribution platforms since we started hosting Apache OpenOffice Extensions and Templates sites back in March 2012 (official timeline). Read below to know more about what’s new.

1) Login with your Facebook or Google account.

Finally Apache OpenOffice Extensions website got social, and allows people to login using their Facebook or Google accounts. This would avoid end-users the annoyance of registering and make possible for them to upload a new extension or template from the very first moment. Check it out at http://extensions.openoffice.org/user

The feature has been already tested over the last few weeks and we observed that about 30% of new users are coming this way.

2) OpenOffice 4 Compatibility Information

You can now see at a glance if an extension is OpenOffice 4 compatible (e.g. English dictionaries for Apache OpenOffice). For extensions that do not provide compatibility data we welcome end-users feedback, by casting a vote to “User feedback: Compatible with OpenOffice 4.x?” you can help us to update the compatibility information for extensions that do not have it yet.

3) OS Automatic Detection

Since some extensions have different versions for the different operating systems – e.g. MySQL Driver for Apache OpenOffice – the “Download now” button automatically provides the right version, with a link to “All releases” to download versions for other platforms.

4) Co-maintainers

Now Extensions authors can enable “co-maintainers” to manage their extensions. Co-maintainers are allowed to create new releases and to modify extensions’ descriptions.

April 2014 Project of the Month, Free Pascal

For our April Community Choice Project of the Month, our community has selected Free Pascal, an advanced open source compiler for Pascal and Object Pascal. The project founder, Florian Klaempfl, tells us about the project’s history, purpose, and direction.

SourceForge: Tell us about the Free Pascal project please…
Florian Klaempfl: Free Pascal is an OSS pascal compiler supporting different pascal dialects including modern Object Pascal (for more details see theFree Pascal Homepage). It is written itself in Object Pascal, so users do not have to learn another language if they want to improve their compiler.

SF: What made you start this?
FK: In the early nineties, I wrote chess programs using Turbo Pascal. TP was a 16 bit compiler so it didn’t take advantage of the i386 getting popular at this time. After trying some alternatives, none of them made me happy, I decided to write my own compiler. This was in 1992. The current code base
of FPC was started in 1993. Sounds like Linux at the beginning of Linux, right :) ?

SF: Has the original vision been achieved?
FK: In the sense having a 32 bit compiler pascal compiler yes, in the sense to use it for my chess programs, no. I never ported my chess programs to FPC.

SF: Who can benefit the most from your project?
FK: I think there are multiple groups who can benefit from it:

- People who want to learn only one programming language which allows them to use it for almost everything: FPC can be used to do big database applications but it can be also used to program embedded devices. It can used to write numerical applications but also to code for mobile devices.
- People who have a large Pascal/Object Pascal code base
- People who are interested in a programming language which offers a compromise between high
productivity and the advantages of native code.

Obviously, the most can benefit people who are part of all three groups.

SF: What is the need for this particular programming language?
FK: Modern Object Pascal supports most language features which are expected from an OOP language. In combination with its good readability it is a very powerful language.

Further, the concept of modern pascal allows very fast turn around times. While some people might say this does not matter with today’s machines, I still think it makes a difference: FPC rebuilds its own compiler sources (i386: ~330k lines) on an i7-4770 in 4.2 s. So no need for a cup of coffee while compiling a project.

SF: What’s the best way to get the most out of using Free Pascal?
FK: Using it in combination with Lazarus: a RAD built on top of FPC.

SF: What has your project team done to help build and nurture your community?
FK: I think the most important thing which helps to build and nurture the community is stability in
different aspects:
- we try to break never people’s code, so backward compatibility is an important thing
- we do heavy automated regression testing to avoid bugs being reintroduced, every night, regression tests are run with >100 different configurations and the results are collected in a central database. Developers get a daily summary of the
tests with information if regressions appeared.

Further, FPC tries to give everybody being interested in an working on an OSS pascal compiler a “home”. So the development directions are mainly driven by the contributors as long as two basic rules are obeyed: FPC is a pascal* compiler and other people’s code may not be broken**. Recent example: revived m68k support. It makes little sense to do so to get a lot of new users of FPC, but if somebody implements it, he is free to do so.

*This is subject to be discussed, “wirthian language” compiler might be also ok.
**Of course, sometimes this cannot be avoided.

SF: Have you all found that more frequent releases helps build up your community of users?
FK: FPC has a very slow release cycle: during the last years it is approx. one release per year. There are multiple reasons for this:
- FPC is almost 21 years old, so it has a certain maturity
- Building FPC from development head is not hard and normally done, see above, within a few minutes
- Due to its maturity and a development model grown over years, the development head is normally also very stable.
- We normally prepare binary releases and these binary are not just compiled, packed and uploaded but also tested. Due to the amount of platforms this takes considerable time so each release cycle eats also time which could be spent in other things.

SF: What was the first big thing that happened for your project?
FK: For me it was when the compiler was able to build its own sources, this was in 1995 after almost two years of work.

SF: What is the next big thing for Free Pascal (and/or feel free to talk more in depth about the “write once, compile anywhere” concept, sounds interesting)?
FK:The next big thing for FPC will be the 3.0 release: Besides a lot of new language features, bug fixes and improvements, 3.0 will extend the compile anywhere concept further. It is expected to be the first FPC release version which can output jvm code as well as i8086 code and maybe also the avr port will be in a usable shape.

SF: How long do you think that will take?
FK: We expect to release 3.0 in 2015.

SF: Do you have the resources you need to make that happen?
FK: Normally yes, the only question is what will be in 3.0.

SF: If you had it to do over again, what would you do differently for Free Pascal?
FK: Actually not much.

SF: Is there anything else we should know?
FK: I think the most interesting aspect is that FPC has no company in the background: it is developed by a community of people having either a need for it or having just fun working on it as their hobby.