nload / News: Recent posts

nload 0.7.0 released

I am pleased to announce nload 0.7.0.

After about four years without a single release, I have been reworking the codebase and implementing some additional features. Some bugs which accumulated during the last years where fixed as well.

First, nload is now capable of reading and writing configuration files to disk. On start, settings are restored from /etc/nload.conf and $HOME/.nload (in this order). During runtime, the shortcut F5 is used to write the current settings to the user's home directory. To return modified settings to their stored values, press F6.... read more

Posted by Roland Riegel 2008-02-02

nload 0.6.0 released

We are happy to announce nload 0.6.0.

nload is a console application which monitors network traffic and bandwidth usage in real time. It visualizes the in- and outgoing traffic using two graphs and provides additional info like total amount of transfered data and min/max network usage.

With this release, nload was ported to the HP-UX operating system. Thanks for this go to Roshan Sequeira from HP India.... read more

Posted by Roland Riegel 2003-12-18

nload 0.5.0 released

Finally after about eight months we are
proud to release nload 0.5.0.

Most important change is an option
window where you can change all the
command line parameters at run time. You
do not need to restart nload for
changing a setting, just change it in
the option window.

In this release nload also displays the
IP address of the currently viewed
device. For people who are connected to
many networks this might help to keep the
overview over the similiar device names.... read more

Posted by Roland Riegel 2002-08-18

nload-user mailing list created

For upcoming discussions about nload, its usage and compilation, the new mailing list nload-user@lists.sourceforge.net has been created. To subscribe to the list, either visit https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/nload-user or send a mail with the subject "subscribe" to nload-user-request@lists.sourceforge.net

Posted by Roland Riegel 2002-07-05

nload 0.4.0 released

Today we released version 0.4.0 of nload.

We are proud that nload now runs not only on Linux,
but also on Solaris and several BSD variants like
FreeBSD etc.
This means that the most bothering restriction of
nload is fallen and that many other users who are not
running Linux can utilize it now too.

Besides of the port to many new operating systems
nload has gained some nice new features.
First, it got the new command line switches -u and -U
for configuring the units of the displayed traffic
numbers. Using them, you can not only switch between
kbit/s, Mbit/s etc., but also enable the mode "human
readable" known by many command line tools. If
enabled, nload choses the appropriate units itself.
The second new feature is the tripled graph
resolution. This is done by displaying three
different chars instead of a single '#'. This way
nload is able to display the traffic much smoother.
And third, nload now handles a restart of the network
device correctly. It no longer sums 4GB to the total
traffic number.

Posted by Roland Riegel 2001-12-06

nload 0.3.2 released

This is mainly a bugfix release for nload 0.3.1.

The 4GB workaround included in version 0.3.1 did
not work, in contrary it limited the maximum
displayed data to 2048MB.

nload 0.3.2 fixes this problem.

We are sorry for the inconvenience.

Posted by Roland Riegel 2001-10-20

nload 0.3.1 released

This is the second version of nload announced at Sourceforge.

Although this is a minor release, there are some neat and new features.

For instance, a new command line parameter was introduced. Use the -m switch to hide the graphs of the incoming and outgoing traffic. This allows you to display more than one network devices at a time. If you have given more devices than you have place on the screen for, use the well-known arrow keys to switch to the next ones.... read more

Posted by Roland Riegel 2001-10-17

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