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-                  =========================================
-                  PTHREADS-WIN32 Frequently Asked Questions
-                  =========================================
-
-INDEX
------
-
-Q 1	What is it?
-
-Q 2	Which of the several dll versions do I use?
-	or,
-	What are all these pthread*.dll and pthread*.lib files?
-
-Q 3	What is the library naming convention?
-
-Q 4	Cleanup code default style or: it used to work when I built
-	the library myself, but now it doesn't - why?
-
-Q 5	Why is the default library version now less exception-friendly?
-
-Q 6	Should I use Cygwin or Mingw32 as a development environment?
-
-Q 7	Now that pthreads-win32 builds under Mingw32, why do I get
-	memory access violations (segfaults)?
-
-Q 8	How do I use pthread.dll for Win32 (Visual C++ 5.0)
-
-Q 9	Cancelation doesn't work for me, why?
-
-Q 10	Thread won't block after two calls to mutex_lock
-
-Q 11	How do I generate pthreadGCE.dll and libpthreadw32.a for use with Mingw32?
-
-=============================================================================
-
-Q 1	What is it?
----
-
-Pthreads-win32 is an Open Source Software implementation of the
-Threads component of the POSIX 1003.1c 1995 Standard for Microsoft's
-Win32 environment. Some functions from POSIX 1003.1b are also
-supported including semaphores. Other related functions include
-the set of read-write lock functions. The library also supports
-some of the functionality of the Open Group's Single Unix
-specification, version 2, namely mutex types.
-
-See the file "ANNOUNCE" for more information including standards
-conformance details and list of supported routines.
-
-
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
-Q 2	Which of the several dll versions do I use?
----	or,
-	What are all these pthread*.dll and pthread*.lib files?
-
-Simply, you only use one of them, but you need to choose carefully.
-
-The most important choice you need to make is whether to use a
-version that uses exceptions internally, or not (there are versions
-of the library that use exceptions as part of the thread
-cancelation and exit implementation, and one that uses
-setjmp/longjmp instead).
-
-There is some contension amongst POSIX threads experts as
-to how POSIX threads cancelation and exit should work
-with languages that include exceptions and handlers, e.g.
-C++ and even C (Microsoft's Structured Exceptions).
-
-The issue is: should cancelation of a thread in, say,
-a C++ application cause object destructors and C++ exception
-handlers to be invoked as the stack unwinds during thread
-exit, or not?
-
-There seems to be more opinion in favour of using the
-standard C version of the library (no EH) with C++ applications
-since this appears to be the assumption commercial pthreads
-implementations make. Therefore, if you use an EH version
-of pthreads-win32 then you may be under the illusion that
-your application will be portable, when in fact it is likely to
-behave very differently linked with other pthreads libraries.
-
-Now you may be asking: why have you kept the EH versions of
-the library?
-
-There are a couple of reasons:
-- there is division amongst the experts and so the code may
-  be needed in the future. (Yes, it's in the repository and we
-  can get it out anytime in the future, but ...)
-- pthreads-win32 is one of the few implementations, and possibly
-  the only freely available one, that has EH versions. It may be
-  useful to people who want to play with or study application
-  behaviour under these conditions.
-
-
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
-Q 3	What is the library naming convention?
----
-
-Because the library is being built using various exception
-handling schemes and compilers - and because the library
-may not work reliably if these are mixed in an application,
-each different version of the library has it's own name.
-
-Note 1: the incompatibility is really between EH implementations
-of the different compilers. It should be possible to use the
-standard C version from either compiler with C++ applications
-built with a different compiler. If you use an EH version of
-the library, then you must use the same compiler for the
-application. This is another complication and dependency that
-can be avoided by using only the standard C library version.
-
-Note 2: if you use a standard C pthread*.dll with a C++
-application, then any functions that you define that are
-intended to be called via pthread_cleanup_push() must be
-__cdecl.
-
-Note 3: the intention is to also name either the VC or GC
-version (it should be arbitrary) as pthread.dll, including
-pthread.lib and libpthread.a as appropriate.
-
-In general:
-	pthread[VG]{SE,CE,C}.dll
-	pthread[VG]{SE,CE,C}.lib
-
-where:
-	[VG] indicates the compiler
-	V	- MS VC
-	G	- GNU C
-
-	{SE,CE,C} indicates the exception handling scheme
-	SE	- Structured EH
-	CE	- C++ EH
-	C       - no exceptions - uses setjmp/longjmp
-
-For example:
-	pthreadVSE.dll	(MSVC/SEH)
-	pthreadGCE.dll	(GNUC/C++ EH)
-	pthreadGC.dll   (GNUC/not dependent on exceptions)
-
-The GNU library archive file names have changed to:
-
-	libpthreadGCE.a
-	libpthreadGC.a
-
-
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
-Q 4	Cleanup code default style or: it used to work when I built
----	the library myself, but now it doesn't - why?
-
-Up to and including snapshot 2001-07-12, if not defined, the cleanup
-style was determined automatically from the compiler used, and one
-of the following was defined accordingly:
-
-	__CLEANUP_SEH	MSVC only
-	__CLEANUP_CXX	C++, including MSVC++, GNU G++
-	__CLEANUP_C		C, including GNU GCC, not MSVC
-
-These defines determine the style of cleanup (see pthread.h) and,
-most importantly, the way that cancelation and thread exit (via
-pthread_exit) is performed (see the routine ptw32_throw() in private.c).
-
-In short, the exceptions versions of the library throw an exception
-when a thread is canceled or exits (via pthread_exit()), which is
-caught by a handler in the thread startup routine, so that the
-the correct stack unwinding occurs regardless of where the thread
-is when it's canceled or exits via pthread_exit().
-
-After snapshot 2001-07-12, unless your build explicitly defines (e.g.
-via a compiler option) __CLEANUP_SEH, __CLEANUP_CXX, or __CLEANUP_C, then
-the build now ALWAYS defaults to __CLEANUP_C style cleanup. This style
-uses setjmp/longjmp in the cancelation and pthread_exit implementations,
-and therefore won't do stack unwinding even when linked to applications
-that have it (e.g. C++ apps). This is for consistency with most/all
-commercial Unix POSIX threads implementations.
-
-Although it was not clearly documented before, it is still necessary to
-build your application using the same __CLEANUP_* define as was
-used for the version of the library that you link with, so that the
-correct parts of pthread.h are included. That is, the possible
-defines require the following library versions:
-
-	__CLEANUP_SEH	pthreadVSE.dll
-	__CLEANUP_CXX	pthreadVCE.dll or pthreadGCE.dll
-	__CLEANUP_C		pthreadVC.dll or pthreadGC.dll
-
-THE POINT OF ALL THIS IS: if you have not been defining one of these
-explicitly, then the defaults have been set according to the compiler
-and language you are using, as described at the top of this
-section.
-
-THIS NOW CHANGES, as has been explained above. For example:
-
-If you were building your application with MSVC++ i.e. using C++
-exceptions (rather than SEH) and not explicitly defining one of
-__CLEANUP_*, then __CLEANUP_C++ was defined for you in pthread.h.
-You should have been linking with pthreadVCE.dll, which does
-stack unwinding.
-
-If you now build your application as you had before, pthread.h will now
-set __CLEANUP_C as the default style, and you will need to link
-with pthreadVC.dll. Stack unwinding will now NOT occur when a
-thread is canceled, nor when the thread calls pthread_exit().
-
-Your application will now most likely behave differently to previous
-versions, and in non-obvious ways. Most likely is that local
-objects may not be destroyed or cleaned up after a thread
-is canceled.
-
-If you want the same behaviour as before, then you must now define
-__CLEANUP_C++ explicitly using a compiler option and link with
-pthreadVCE.dll as you did before.
-
-
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
-Q 5	Why is the default library version now less exception-friendly?
----
-
-Because most commercial Unix POSIX threads implementations don't allow you to
-choose to have stack unwinding. (Compaq's TRU64 Unix is possibly an exception.)
-
-Therefore, providing it in pthread-win32 as a default could be dangerous. We
-still provide the choice but you must now consciously make it.
-
-WHY NOT REMOVE THE EXCEPTIONS VERSIONS OF THE LIBRARY ALTOGETHER?
-There are a few reasons:
-- because there are well respected POSIX threads people who believe
-  that POSIX threads implementations should be exceptions-aware and
-  do the expected thing in that context. (There are equally respected
-  people who believe it should not be easily accessible, if it's there
-  at all.)
-- because pthreads-win32 is one of the few implementations that has
-  the choice, perhaps the only freely available one, and so offers
-  a laboratory to people who may want to explore the effects;
-- although the code will always be around somewhere for anyone who
-  wants it, once it's removed from the current version it will not be
-  nearly as visible to people who may have a use for it.
-
-
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
-Q 6	Should I use Cygwin or Mingw32 as a development environment?
----
-
-Important: see Q7 also.
-
-Use Mingw32 with the MSVCRT library to build applications that use
-the pthreads DLL.
-
-Cygwin's own internal support for POSIX threads is growing.
-Consult that project's documentation for more information.
-
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
-Q 7	Now that pthreads-win32 builds under Mingw32, why do I get
----	memory access violations (segfaults)?
-
-The latest Mingw32 package has thread-safe exception handling (see Q10).
-Also, see Q6 above.
-
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
-Q 8	How do I use pthread.dll for Win32 (Visual C++ 5.0)
----	
-
->
-> I'm a "rookie" when it comes to your pthread implementation.  I'm currently
-> desperately trying to install the prebuilt .dll file into my MSVC compiler.
-> Could you please provide me with explicit instructions on how to do this (or
-> direct me to a resource(s) where I can acquire such information)?
->
-> Thank you,
->
-
-You should have a .dll, .lib, .def, and three .h files. It is recommended
-that you use pthreadVC.dll, rather than pthreadVCE.dll or pthreadVSE.dll
-(see Q2 above).
-
-The .dll can go in any directory listed in your PATH environment
-variable, so putting it into C:\WINDOWS should work.
-
-The .lib file can go in any directory listed in your LIB environment
-variable.
-
-The .h files can go in any directory listed in your INCLUDE
-environment variable.
-
-Or you might prefer to put the .lib and .h files into a new directory
-and add its path to LIB and INCLUDE. You can probably do this easiest
-by editing the file:-
-
-C:\Program Files\DevStudio\vc\bin\vcvars32.bat
-
-The .def file isn't used by anything in the pre-compiled version but 
-is included for information.
-
-Cheers.
-Ross
-
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
-Q 9	Cancelation doesn't work for me, why?
----
-
-> I'm investigating a problem regarding thread cancelation. The thread I want
-> to cancel has PTHREAD_CANCEL_ASYNCHRONOUS, however, this piece of code
-> blocks on the join():
->
->               if ((retv = Pthread_cancel( recvThread )) == 0)
->               {
->                       retv = Pthread_join( recvThread, 0 );
->               }
->
-> Pthread_* are just macro's; they call pthread_*.
->
-> The thread recvThread seems to block on a select() call. It doesn't get
-> cancelled.
->
-> Two questions:
->
-> 1) is this normal behaviour?
->
-> 2) if not, how does the cancel mechanism work? I'm not very familliar to
-> win32 programming, so I don't really understand how the *Event() family of
-> calls work.
-
-Async cancelation should be in versions post snapshot-1999-11-02
-of pthreads-win32 (currently only for x86 architectures).
-
-The answer to your first question is, normal POSIX behaviour would  
-be to asynchronously cancel the thread. However, even that doesn't
-guarantee cancelation as the standard only says it should be
-cancelled as soon as possible.
-
-However ...
-
-Snapshot 99-11-02 or earlier only partially supports asynchronous cancellation.
-Snapshots since then simulate async cancelation by poking the address of
-a cancelation routine into the PC of the threads context. This requires
-the thread to be resumed in some way for the cancelation to actually
-proceed. This is not true async cancelation, but it is as close as we've
-been able to get to it.
-
-If the thread you're trying to cancel is blocked (for instance, it could be
-waiting for data from the network), it will only get cancelled when it unblocks
-(when the data arrives). Unfortunately, there is no way to do so from
-outside the thread.
-
-Using deferred cancelation would normally be the way to go, however,
-even though the POSIX threads standard lists a number of C library
-functions that are defined as deferred cancelation points, there is
-no hookup between those which are provided by Windows and the
-pthreads-win32 library.
-
-Incidently, it's worth noting for code portability that the POSIX
-threads standard list doesn't include "select" because (as I read in
-Butenhof) it isn't part of POSIX.
-
-Effectively, the only cancelation points that pthreads-win32 can
-recognise are those the library implements itself, ie.
-        
-        pthread_testcancel
-        pthread_cond_wait
-        pthread_cond_timedwait
-	pthread_join
-        sem_wait
-        pthread_delay_np
-
-Pthreads-win32 also provides two functions that allow you to create
-cancelation points within your application, but only for cases where
-a thread is going to block on a Win32 handle. These are:
-
-        pthreadCancelableWait(HANDLE waitHandle) /* Infinite wait */
- 
-        pthreadCancelableTimedWait(HANDLE waitHandle, DWORD timeout)
-
-Regards.
-Ross
-
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
- 
-
-Q 10	How do I create thread-safe applications using
-----    pthreadGCE.dll, libpthreadw32.a and Mingw32?
-
-See Thomas Pfaff's email at:
-http://sources.redhat.com/ml/pthreads-win32/2002/msg00000.html
-
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
- 
+                  =========================================
+                  PTHREADS-WIN32 Frequently Asked Questions
+                  =========================================
+
+INDEX
+-----
+
+Q 1	What is it?
+
+Q 2	Which of the several dll versions do I use?
+	or,
+	What are all these pthread*.dll and pthread*.lib files?
+
+Q 3	What is the library naming convention?
+
+Q 4	Cleanup code default style or: it used to work when I built
+	the library myself, but now it doesn't - why?
+
+Q 5	Why is the default library version now less exception-friendly?
+
+Q 6	Should I use Cygwin or Mingw32 as a development environment?
+
+Q 7	Now that pthreads-win32 builds under Mingw32, why do I get
+	memory access violations (segfaults)?
+
+Q 8	How do I use pthread.dll for Win32 (Visual C++ 5.0)
+
+Q 9	Cancelation doesn't work for me, why?
+
+Q 10	Thread won't block after two calls to mutex_lock
+
+Q 11	How do I generate pthreadGCE.dll and libpthreadw32.a for use with Mingw32?
+
+=============================================================================
+
+Q 1	What is it?
+---
+
+Pthreads-win32 is an Open Source Software implementation of the
+Threads component of the POSIX 1003.1c 1995 Standard for Microsoft's
+Win32 environment. Some functions from POSIX 1003.1b are also
+supported including semaphores. Other related functions include
+the set of read-write lock functions. The library also supports
+some of the functionality of the Open Group's Single Unix
+specification, version 2, namely mutex types.
+
+See the file "ANNOUNCE" for more information including standards
+conformance details and list of supported routines.
+
+
+------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+
+Q 2	Which of the several dll versions do I use?
+---	or,
+	What are all these pthread*.dll and pthread*.lib files?
+
+Simply, you only use one of them, but you need to choose carefully.
+
+The most important choice you need to make is whether to use a
+version that uses exceptions internally, or not (there are versions
+of the library that use exceptions as part of the thread
+cancelation and exit implementation, and one that uses
+setjmp/longjmp instead).
+
+There is some contension amongst POSIX threads experts as
+to how POSIX threads cancelation and exit should work
+with languages that include exceptions and handlers, e.g.
+C++ and even C (Microsoft's Structured Exceptions).
+
+The issue is: should cancelation of a thread in, say,
+a C++ application cause object destructors and C++ exception
+handlers to be invoked as the stack unwinds during thread
+exit, or not?
+
+There seems to be more opinion in favour of using the
+standard C version of the library (no EH) with C++ applications
+since this appears to be the assumption commercial pthreads
+implementations make. Therefore, if you use an EH version
+of pthreads-win32 then you may be under the illusion that
+your application will be portable, when in fact it is likely to
+behave very differently linked with other pthreads libraries.
+
+Now you may be asking: why have you kept the EH versions of
+the library?
+
+There are a couple of reasons:
+- there is division amongst the experts and so the code may
+  be needed in the future. (Yes, it's in the repository and we
+  can get it out anytime in the future, but ...)
+- pthreads-win32 is one of the few implementations, and possibly
+  the only freely available one, that has EH versions. It may be
+  useful to people who want to play with or study application
+  behaviour under these conditions.
+
+
+------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+
+Q 3	What is the library naming convention?
+---
+
+Because the library is being built using various exception
+handling schemes and compilers - and because the library
+may not work reliably if these are mixed in an application,
+each different version of the library has it's own name.
+
+Note 1: the incompatibility is really between EH implementations
+of the different compilers. It should be possible to use the
+standard C version from either compiler with C++ applications
+built with a different compiler. If you use an EH version of
+the library, then you must use the same compiler for the
+application. This is another complication and dependency that
+can be avoided by using only the standard C library version.
+
+Note 2: if you use a standard C pthread*.dll with a C++
+application, then any functions that you define that are
+intended to be called via pthread_cleanup_push() must be
+__cdecl.
+
+Note 3: the intention is to also name either the VC or GC
+version (it should be arbitrary) as pthread.dll, including
+pthread.lib and libpthread.a as appropriate.
+
+In general:
+	pthread[VG]{SE,CE,C}.dll
+	pthread[VG]{SE,CE,C}.lib
+
+where:
+	[VG] indicates the compiler
+	V	- MS VC
+	G	- GNU C
+
+	{SE,CE,C} indicates the exception handling scheme
+	SE	- Structured EH
+	CE	- C++ EH
+	C       - no exceptions - uses setjmp/longjmp
+
+For example:
+	pthreadVSE.dll	(MSVC/SEH)
+	pthreadGCE.dll	(GNUC/C++ EH)
+	pthreadGC.dll   (GNUC/not dependent on exceptions)
+
+The GNU library archive file names have changed to:
+
+	libpthreadGCE.a
+	libpthreadGC.a
+
+
+------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+
+Q 4	Cleanup code default style or: it used to work when I built
+---	the library myself, but now it doesn't - why?
+
+Up to and including snapshot 2001-07-12, if not defined, the cleanup
+style was determined automatically from the compiler used, and one
+of the following was defined accordingly:
+
+	__CLEANUP_SEH	MSVC only
+	__CLEANUP_CXX	C++, including MSVC++, GNU G++
+	__CLEANUP_C		C, including GNU GCC, not MSVC
+
+These defines determine the style of cleanup (see pthread.h) and,
+most importantly, the way that cancelation and thread exit (via
+pthread_exit) is performed (see the routine ptw32_throw() in private.c).
+
+In short, the exceptions versions of the library throw an exception
+when a thread is canceled or exits (via pthread_exit()), which is
+caught by a handler in the thread startup routine, so that the
+the correct stack unwinding occurs regardless of where the thread
+is when it's canceled or exits via pthread_exit().
+
+After snapshot 2001-07-12, unless your build explicitly defines (e.g.
+via a compiler option) __CLEANUP_SEH, __CLEANUP_CXX, or __CLEANUP_C, then
+the build now ALWAYS defaults to __CLEANUP_C style cleanup. This style
+uses setjmp/longjmp in the cancelation and pthread_exit implementations,
+and therefore won't do stack unwinding even when linked to applications
+that have it (e.g. C++ apps). This is for consistency with most/all
+commercial Unix POSIX threads implementations.
+
+Although it was not clearly documented before, it is still necessary to
+build your application using the same __CLEANUP_* define as was
+used for the version of the library that you link with, so that the
+correct parts of pthread.h are included. That is, the possible
+defines require the following library versions:
+
+	__CLEANUP_SEH	pthreadVSE.dll
+	__CLEANUP_CXX	pthreadVCE.dll or pthreadGCE.dll
+	__CLEANUP_C		pthreadVC.dll or pthreadGC.dll
+
+THE POINT OF ALL THIS IS: if you have not been defining one of these
+explicitly, then the defaults have been set according to the compiler
+and language you are using, as described at the top of this
+section.
+
+THIS NOW CHANGES, as has been explained above. For example:
+
+If you were building your application with MSVC++ i.e. using C++
+exceptions (rather than SEH) and not explicitly defining one of
+__CLEANUP_*, then __CLEANUP_C++ was defined for you in pthread.h.
+You should have been linking with pthreadVCE.dll, which does
+stack unwinding.
+
+If you now build your application as you had before, pthread.h will now
+set __CLEANUP_C as the default style, and you will need to link
+with pthreadVC.dll. Stack unwinding will now NOT occur when a
+thread is canceled, nor when the thread calls pthread_exit().
+
+Your application will now most likely behave differently to previous
+versions, and in non-obvious ways. Most likely is that local
+objects may not be destroyed or cleaned up after a thread
+is canceled.
+
+If you want the same behaviour as before, then you must now define
+__CLEANUP_C++ explicitly using a compiler option and link with
+pthreadVCE.dll as you did before.
+
+
+------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+
+Q 5	Why is the default library version now less exception-friendly?
+---
+
+Because most commercial Unix POSIX threads implementations don't allow you to
+choose to have stack unwinding. (Compaq's TRU64 Unix is possibly an exception.)
+
+Therefore, providing it in pthread-win32 as a default could be dangerous. We
+still provide the choice but you must now consciously make it.
+
+WHY NOT REMOVE THE EXCEPTIONS VERSIONS OF THE LIBRARY ALTOGETHER?
+There are a few reasons:
+- because there are well respected POSIX threads people who believe
+  that POSIX threads implementations should be exceptions-aware and
+  do the expected thing in that context. (There are equally respected
+  people who believe it should not be easily accessible, if it's there
+  at all.)
+- because pthreads-win32 is one of the few implementations that has
+  the choice, perhaps the only freely available one, and so offers
+  a laboratory to people who may want to explore the effects;
+- although the code will always be around somewhere for anyone who
+  wants it, once it's removed from the current version it will not be
+  nearly as visible to people who may have a use for it.
+
+
+------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+
+Q 6	Should I use Cygwin or Mingw32 as a development environment?
+---
+
+Important: see Q7 also.
+
+Use Mingw32 with the MSVCRT library to build applications that use
+the pthreads DLL.
+
+Cygwin's own internal support for POSIX threads is growing.
+Consult that project's documentation for more information.
+
+------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+
+Q 7	Now that pthreads-win32 builds under Mingw32, why do I get
+---	memory access violations (segfaults)?
+
+The latest Mingw32 package has thread-safe exception handling (see Q10).
+Also, see Q6 above.
+
+------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+
+Q 8	How do I use pthread.dll for Win32 (Visual C++ 5.0)
+---	
+
+>
+> I'm a "rookie" when it comes to your pthread implementation.  I'm currently
+> desperately trying to install the prebuilt .dll file into my MSVC compiler.
+> Could you please provide me with explicit instructions on how to do this (or
+> direct me to a resource(s) where I can acquire such information)?
+>
+> Thank you,
+>
+
+You should have a .dll, .lib, .def, and three .h files. It is recommended
+that you use pthreadVC.dll, rather than pthreadVCE.dll or pthreadVSE.dll
+(see Q2 above).
+
+The .dll can go in any directory listed in your PATH environment
+variable, so putting it into C:\WINDOWS should work.
+
+The .lib file can go in any directory listed in your LIB environment
+variable.
+
+The .h files can go in any directory listed in your INCLUDE
+environment variable.
+
+Or you might prefer to put the .lib and .h files into a new directory
+and add its path to LIB and INCLUDE. You can probably do this easiest
+by editing the file:-
+
+C:\Program Files\DevStudio\vc\bin\vcvars32.bat
+
+The .def file isn't used by anything in the pre-compiled version but 
+is included for information.
+
+Cheers.
+Ross
+
+------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+
+Q 9	Cancelation doesn't work for me, why?
+---
+
+> I'm investigating a problem regarding thread cancelation. The thread I want
+> to cancel has PTHREAD_CANCEL_ASYNCHRONOUS, however, this piece of code
+> blocks on the join():
+>
+>               if ((retv = Pthread_cancel( recvThread )) == 0)
+>               {
+>                       retv = Pthread_join( recvThread, 0 );
+>               }
+>
+> Pthread_* are just macro's; they call pthread_*.
+>
+> The thread recvThread seems to block on a select() call. It doesn't get
+> cancelled.
+>
+> Two questions:
+>
+> 1) is this normal behaviour?
+>
+> 2) if not, how does the cancel mechanism work? I'm not very familliar to
+> win32 programming, so I don't really understand how the *Event() family of
+> calls work.
+
+Async cancelation should be in versions post snapshot-1999-11-02
+of pthreads-win32 (currently only for x86 architectures).
+
+The answer to your first question is, normal POSIX behaviour would  
+be to asynchronously cancel the thread. However, even that doesn't
+guarantee cancelation as the standard only says it should be
+cancelled as soon as possible.
+
+However ...
+
+Snapshot 99-11-02 or earlier only partially supports asynchronous cancellation.
+Snapshots since then simulate async cancelation by poking the address of
+a cancelation routine into the PC of the threads context. This requires
+the thread to be resumed in some way for the cancelation to actually
+proceed. This is not true async cancelation, but it is as close as we've
+been able to get to it.
+
+If the thread you're trying to cancel is blocked (for instance, it could be
+waiting for data from the network), it will only get cancelled when it unblocks
+(when the data arrives). Unfortunately, there is no way to do so from
+outside the thread.
+
+Using deferred cancelation would normally be the way to go, however,
+even though the POSIX threads standard lists a number of C library
+functions that are defined as deferred cancelation points, there is
+no hookup between those which are provided by Windows and the
+pthreads-win32 library.
+
+Incidently, it's worth noting for code portability that the POSIX
+threads standard list doesn't include "select" because (as I read in
+Butenhof) it isn't part of POSIX.
+
+Effectively, the only cancelation points that pthreads-win32 can
+recognise are those the library implements itself, ie.
+        
+        pthread_testcancel
+        pthread_cond_wait
+        pthread_cond_timedwait
+	pthread_join
+        sem_wait
+        pthread_delay_np
+
+Pthreads-win32 also provides two functions that allow you to create
+cancelation points within your application, but only for cases where
+a thread is going to block on a Win32 handle. These are:
+
+        pthreadCancelableWait(HANDLE waitHandle) /* Infinite wait */
+ 
+        pthreadCancelableTimedWait(HANDLE waitHandle, DWORD timeout)
+
+Regards.
+Ross
+
+------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+ 
+
+Q 10	How do I create thread-safe applications using
+----    pthreadGCE.dll, libpthreadw32.a and Mingw32?
+
+See Thomas Pfaff's email at:
+http://sources.redhat.com/ml/pthreads-win32/2002/msg00000.html
+
+------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+ 

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