#109 too many ogg123 players for single client

open
Other (15)
5
2003-02-16
2003-02-16
Anonymous
No

I have a single client on a private network. All of my
4600 files are OGG formated. After installing 3.1b2,
and after the long recache I started to play my files.
From the first play, there were 3 ogg123 instances and
one lame instance. From time to time (I have not
isolated it yet) as many as 6 or 7 instances of ogg123
are present. This tends to hose my 500mhz system. (Even
with 1GB ram).

Discussion

  • Nobody/Anonymous

    Logged In: NO

    I reviewed the code. I was not able to determine if there
    was a problem destroying the active thread or not. Also, I
    was not able to determine there was some event that was
    calling the open function too many times. I need to review
    the code again looking for a 'verbose' or logging switch.

     
  • Nobody/Anonymous

    Logged In: NO

    BTW: this bug makes my 500mhz machine useless.

     
  • Nobody/Anonymous

    Logged In: NO

    I continued to review the code. The problem is that
    filehandle->close() is only completing the close() by
    terminating the lame process and not the ogg123 too. I don't
    know enough to determine if this is a perl of unix thing.

     
  • Nobody/Anonymous

    Logged In: NO

    I posted this problem on the "perl monks" site. I'm holding to
    the idea that the handle being created is the pipe's handle. It
    makes sense because the pipe goes away and lame gets the
    close pipe signal/event/whatever. On the otherhand, the
    ogg123 process is ignoring the event and continues and is
    therefore piping to /dev/null or something like that and
    therefore wont' terminate until the song is finished. All the
    while sucking up all of my prescious resources.

    One of the monks suggested this <a
    href="http://www.perlmonks.com/index.pl?
    node_id=246397">snippet</a> It's reasonable if it works.

     

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