Two Linux lists for one partition?

maya
2013-04-28
2013-04-28
  • maya

    maya - 2013-04-28

    Hi there!

    I'm using Mac OS X 10.8.3 and elementary OS (based from Ubuntu 12.04) on a 11" MacBook Air.

    After doing a straightforward install of rEFInd (just running ./install.sh in OS X with no further options), and configuring the .conf, my rEFInd menu shows my OS X partition, and two Linux ones...?

    Here's choice one: http://www.elevatorium.org/ss/photo3.JPG

    When I choose this, it loads into BusyBox, and sits at the initramfs prompt. If I type exit, it kernel panics, like so: http://www.elevatorium.org/ss/photo1.JPG :(

    However, here is choice two: http://www.elevatorium.org/ss/photo2.JPG

    When this one is selected, it boots into elementary OS correctly.

    However, I have no idea how to adjust the .conf to show just OS X and the "correct" Linux.

    Help? :/

    Thank you!

    Maya

     
    • Roderick W. Smith

      On 04/28/2013 02:31 PM, maya wrote:

      Hi there!

      I'm using Mac OS X 10.8.3 and elementary OS (based from Ubuntu 12.04)
      on a 11" MacBook Air.

      After doing a straightforward install of rEFInd (just running
      ./install.sh in OS X with no further options), and configuring the
      .conf, my rEFInd menu shows my OS X partition, and two Linux
      ones...?

      It's not two Linux PARTITIONS that are shown; it's two Linux BOOT
      LOADERS. This may sound like a picky and pedantic distinction, but it's
      an important one. If you don't understand how booting under EFI works,
      you'll end up banging your head against numerous problems when you deal
      with any but the simplest single-boot configurations.

      Here's choice one: http://www.elevatorium.org/ss/photo3.JPG

      Note the text under the icon:

      Boot EFI\ubuntu\vmlinuz-3.5.0-27-generic from MacBook Air

      This indicates that it's a tag to boot an EFI boot loader program --
      namely, a Linux kernel called EFI\ubuntu\vmlinuz-3.5.0-25-generic --
      from the partition called "MacBook Air". In fact, this boot loader is a
      Linux kernel with an EFI stub loader. Ordinarily, you won't find kernels
      in the specified location, so my suspicion is that you copied one there
      yourself, possibly following somebody's instructions.

      When I choose this, it loads into BusyBox, and sits at the initramfs
      prompt. If I type exit, it kernel panics, like so:
      http://www.elevatorium.org/ss/photo1.JPG :(

      I'm not entirely sure what caused that problem, but my suspicion is that
      it was a lack of an initial RAM disk (initrd- or initramfs-) file.
      This would happen if you copied the vmlinuz-3.5.0-27-generic file
      without copying its matching init* file.

      However, here is choice two:
      http://www.elevatorium.org/ss/photo2.JPG

      When this one is selected, it boots into elementary OS correctly.

      The heading under this one ("Boot Linux from MacBook Air") indicates
      that it's almost certainly a BIOS-mode boot loader. It's probably
      booting to GRUB in BIOS mode, which in turn is booting Linux. This is
      actually a more complicated boot path and is less desirable than booting
      via an EFI-mode boot loader, but on some Macs it's more reliable than
      using an EFI-mode boot loader.

      However, I have no idea how to adjust the .conf to show just OS X and
      the "correct" Linux.

      The easiest solution is to delete the
      EFI/ubuntu/vmlinuz-3.5.0-27-generic file from the "MacBook Air" volume.
      I'm not sure what partition that is, though. It's probably either your
      EFI System Partition (ESP; typically /dev/sda1 in Linux, although it
      could be another partition) or your OS X root (/) partition. You could
      look for that file, delete it, and then boot Linux in BIOS mode.

      A more complex way to do it is this:

      1) Locate and delete the EFI/ubuntu/vmlinuz-3.5.0-27-generic file as
      above.
      2) In Linux, mount the ESP at /boot/efi. This might already be done,
      or you might need to figure out which partition is your ESP and
      do it manually (possibly creating an empty /boot/efi directory
      first).
      3) In Linux, run the mkrlconf.sh script that comes with rEFInd.
      4) In OS X, install the rEFInd filesystem driver that matches your
      Linux root (/) filesystem (or /boot, if you've got a separate
      /boot partition). This will require creating a "drivers" or
      "drivers_x64" subdirectory under the directory where rEFInd is
      installed (normally EFI/refind on the OS X root directory on on
      the ESP). With the directory in place, installing the driver is
      just a matter of copying the appropriate file from the rEFInd
      package to that location.

      When this is done, you should see one or more new Linux entries that
      refer to vmlinuz-3.5.0-27-generic and/or other kernel files. These
      should boot Linux in EFI mode. If they do, you can then edit the
      refind.conf file, uncomment the "scanfor" line, and ensure that "hdbios"
      is NOT listed. This will remove the BIOS-mode boot loader entry from
      rEFInd's menu, leaving only the EFI entry/entries. (There may be
      multiple entries if you have multiple kernels installed. This is
      actually a good thing because it gives you options in case an updated
      kernel is broken -- you can continue to boot the older one that still
      works.)

      --
      Rod Smith
      rodsmith@rodsbooks.com
      http://www.rodsbooks.com

       

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