If you don't have a program such as Illustrator or Canvas, you can do the same thing in powerpoint.

However, there is a small problem with exporting pictures from powerpoint, but it can be overcome.  I've pasted a description below.

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PowerPoint is actually a quite effective tool in creating precise graphics, such as stereo pictures with labels, or other drawn objects, such as arrows.  Unfortunately, exporting pictures from PowerPoint at reasonable resolution is non-obvious.

The problem:  When you copy an object from PowerPoint and paste it into a non-Microsoft Office program (eg Paint, Photoshop), the image is pasted with a resolution determined by the slide size.

The solution: 
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Now use a program like Illustrator or Canvas to add the stereo/depth cued labels. This is a little tricky to describe, but I'll give it my best shot. Place the two images side by side with their centers separated by 6.0 - 6.5 cm, and aligned horizontally. Now add all your labels on the LEFT figure. select all of your labels and duplicate them. Move the duplicated labels to the RIGHT side. For clarity sake let's assume we have 3 labels on the LEFT side (a,b, and c -- we will call then aL and aR for the left and right labels, respectively). Place aL near a recognizable feature of the LEFT figure that you are trying to label. Now horizontilly align aR with aL. Now using only the <-- and --> keys move the aR label until the identical portion of the actual label (let's say the lower right hand tip of the 'a') is vertically aligned with the identical portion of your model (let's say where the C alpha-C beta bond leaves the ribbon backbone) on both the LEFT and RIGHT images. Repeat these steps for each pair of labels. This is a nice method for adding stereo labels because it does not require looking at your computer screen in wall-eyed stereo for 2 hours in order to get proper placement of labels.

By assuring that the labels are positioned in the LEFT and RIGHT images at positions that are identical with respect to the part of the model that is being labeled you automatically are also placing them so they are at the proper depth when the figure is finally viewed in stereo.

I hope this makes sense. Just email if you want more details.

Scott


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Anthony Duff
Postdoctoral Fellow
School of Molecular and Microbial Biosciences
Biochemistry Building, G08
University of Sydney, NSW 2006 Australia
Phone. 61-2-9351-7817   Fax. 61-2-9351-4726
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