#752 missing end-of-line

closed
nobody
Lisp Core (471)
5
2012-12-04
2005-06-08
No

Extra end of line is needed after timing
(showtime:true) messages on GCL and after
run_testsuite(); on clisp:

[vadim@proxl maxima]$ ./maxima-local -l gcl
Maxima 5.9.1.1cvs http://maxima.sourceforge.net
Using Lisp GNU Common Lisp (GCL) GCL 2.6.6 (aka GCL)
Distributed under the GNU Public License. See the file
COPYING.
Dedicated to the memory of William Schelter.
This is a development version of Maxima. The function
bug_report()
provides bug reporting information.
(%i1) showtime:true;
Evaluation took 0.00 seconds (0.00 elapsed)(%o1)
true
(%i2) x^2;
Evaluation took 0.00 seconds (0.00 elapsed)
2
(%o2) x
(%i3) quit();
[vadim@proxl maxima]$ ./maxima-local -l clisp
i i i i i i i ooooo o ooooooo ooooo
ooooo
I I I I I I I 8 8 8 8 8
o 8 8
I \ `+' / I 8 8 8 8
8 8
\ `-+-' / 8 8 8 ooooo
8oooo
`-__|__-' 8 8 8 8 8
| 8 o 8 8 o 8 8
------+------ ooooo 8oooooo ooo8ooo ooooo 8

Copyright (c) Bruno Haible, Michael Stoll 1992, 1993
Copyright (c) Bruno Haible, Marcus Daniels 1994-1997
Copyright (c) Bruno Haible, Pierpaolo Bernardi, Sam
Steingold 1998
Copyright (c) Bruno Haible, Sam Steingold 1999-2003
--------------------------------------------------------------

Maxima 5.9.1.1cvs http://maxima.sourceforge.net
Using Lisp CLISP 2.33.2 (2004-06-02)
Distributed under the GNU Public License. See the file
COPYING.
Dedicated to the memory of William Schelter.
This is a development version of Maxima. The function
bug_report()
provides bug reporting information.
(%i1) run_testsuite();

Running tests in rtestnset.mac: 477/477 tests passed.
Running tests in rtest1.mac: 28/28 tests passed.
Running tests in rtest1a.mac: 23/23 tests passed.
Running tests in rtest2.mac: 47/47 tests passed.
Running tests in rtest4.mac: 82/82 tests passed.
Running tests in rtest5.mac: 51/51 tests passed.
Running tests in rtest6.mac: 4/4 tests passed.
Running tests in rtest6a.mac: 56/56 tests passed.
Running tests in rtest6b.mac: 16/16 tests passed.
Running tests in rtest7.mac: 41/41 tests passed.
Running tests in rtest9.mac: 77/77 tests passed.
Running tests in rtest9a.mac: 21/21 tests passed.
Running tests in rtest10.mac: 38/38 tests passed.
Running tests in rtest11.mac: 86/86 tests passed.
Running tests in rtest13.mac: 24/24 tests passed.
Running tests in rtest13s.mac: 18/18 tests passed.
Running tests in rtest14.mac: 143/143 tests passed.
Running tests in rtest15.mac: 131/131 tests passed.
Running tests in rtest16.mac: 12/12 tests passed.
Running tests in rtestode.mac: 64/64 tests passed.
Running tests in rtestode_zp.mac: 30/30 tests passed.
Running tests in rtest3.mac: 94/94 tests passed.
Running tests in rtest8.mac: 50/50 tests passed.
Running tests in rtest12.mac: 74/74 tests passed.
Running tests in rexamples.mac: 136/136 tests passed.
Running tests in rtesthyp.mac: 103/103 tests passed.
Running tests in rtestmt19937.mac: 15/15 tests passed.

No unexpected errors found.

Real time: 12.063071 sec.
Run time: 11.963182 sec.
Space: 136145016 Bytes
GC: 116, GC time: 1.011852 sec.(%o0)
done
(%i1)

Discussion

  • Robert Dodier

    Robert Dodier - 2005-06-20

    Logged In: YES
    user_id=501686

    I've observed that newlines get messed up very often when
    there is some output (via FORMAT or some other Lisp
    function) aside from the return value of a function. Error
    messages very often cause the newline to get messed up.

    Examples:

    (%i1) trace(foo);

    foo has no functional properties.(%o1)
    []

    (%i5) :lisp (trace meval)
    (%i5) x^2;
    1. Trace: (MEVAL '((MEXPT) $X 2))
    2. Trace: (MEVAL '$X)
    2. Trace: MEVAL ==> $X
    2. Trace: (MEVAL '2)
    2. Trace: MEVAL ==> 2
    1. Trace: MEVAL ==> ((MEXPT SIMP) $X 2)
    2
    (%o5) x

    Maxima 5.9.1cvs on clisp 2.33.2 (linux).

     
  • Robert Dodier

    Robert Dodier - 2005-07-19

    Logged In: YES
    user_id=501686

    "grind" is another example -- grind prints some stuff to the
    output stream and returns 'done.

    (%i20) grind(foo+bar);
    foo+bar$(%o20) done

     
  • Robert Dodier

    Robert Dodier - 2005-07-19
    • labels: --> Lisp Core
     
  • Vadim V. Zhytnikov

    Logged In: YES
    user_id=366498

    Yet another missing EOL:
    [vadim@proxl maxima]$ ./maxima-local -l gcl
    Maxima 5.9.1.1cvs http://maxima.sourceforge.net
    Using Lisp GNU Common Lisp (GCL) GCL 2.6.7 (aka GCL)
    Distributed under the GNU Public License. See the file COPYING.
    Dedicated to the memory of William Schelter.
    This is a development version of Maxima. The function
    bug_report()
    provides bug reporting information.
    (%i1) batch("000.mac",test);

    Error log on #<output stream 000.ERR>
    ********************** Problem 1 ***************
    Input:
    x : 123

    Result:
    123

    This differed from the expected result:
    x
    x

    0/1 tests passed.
    The following 1 problem failed: (1)(%o1) [000.mac, 1]
    (%i2)
    Problem exists on all Lisps

     
  • Robert Dodier

    Robert Dodier - 2005-09-05

    Logged In: YES
    user_id=501686

    I think what all of the examples shown here have in common
    is that they have an output label (%o) after something other
    than a user input. Output lines are printed via a construct
    something like (DISPLA `((MLABLE) ,LABEL ,$%)) . But DISPLA
    doesn't attempt to determine (via FRESH-LINE or any other
    means) whether the cursor is at the start of a line.

    Putting (FRESH-LINE) at the top of DISPLA fixes the examples
    shown here, although that makes for some extra blank lines.

     
  • Robert Dodier

    Robert Dodier - 2006-08-12

    Logged In: YES
    user_id=501686

    None of the problematic cases mentioned in the original
    report or in comments are observed in 5.9.3cvs / Clisp 2.38,
    GCL 2.6.7, SBCL 0.9.9 on Linux. I'm pretty sure Vadim Zh
    modified the newline stuff several months ago to address
    this problem. Closing this report as fixed.

     
  • Robert Dodier

    Robert Dodier - 2006-08-12
    • status: open --> closed
     

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