best common practices for developing presets

2011-04-11
2013-05-30
  • Thomas Johnson

    Thomas Johnson - 2011-04-11

    Hi,

    I have been researching frequencies associated with specific tasks that I would like to accomplish. So far I have found several but I come to a road block when trying to think of the best way to implement them. For example, I am unsure what would be the best base frequencies, which of my desired frequencies to use for each preset etc.

    During my research I have found the following frequencies are said to be associated with memory, learning and overall intelligence: 3.5hz,5.0hz,6.0hz,6.3hz,7.7hz,7.83hz,8.0-10hz,12,14hz,15.4hz,22hz,40hz,108hz and 142.27hz

    I read about one study that had several college students alternate between 14hz and 22hz(one minute each) for 15 minutes. Which was said to show overall improvement on IQ tests, memory etc.

    I just used this as an example subject and was really just wondering what you guys use to determine the best frequencies to use in your presets. I know what my overall goals are but I am unsure as to how to best build a preset to accomplish those goals.

    Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

     
  • gnaural

    gnaural - 2011-04-18

    Hi, if i were exploring specific frequencies, i'd come up with the simplest schedule (preset) possible, with a steady-state base frequency, beat frequency, and endless loop. here would be an example with 220 as the base freq and 3.9 as the beat:

    <?xml version="1.0"?>
    <!-- See http://gnaural.sourceforge.net -->
    <schedule>
    <gnauralfile_version>1.20101006</gnauralfile_version>
    <gnaural_version>1.0.20110215</gnaural_version>
    <date>Mon Apr 18 08:28:23 2011
    </date>
    <title></title>
    <schedule_description></schedule_description>
    <author></author>
    <totaltime>1</totaltime>
    <voicecount>1</voicecount>
    <totalentrycount>1</totalentrycount>
    <loops>0</loops>
    <overallvolume_left>1</overallvolume_left>
    <overallvolume_right>1</overallvolume_right>
    <stereoswap>0</stereoswap>
    <graphview>1</graphview>
    <voice>
    <description>Voice 0</description>
    <id>0</id>
    <type>0</type>
    <voice_state>1</voice_state>
    <voice_hide>0</voice_hide>
    <voice_mute>0</voice_mute>
    <voice_mono>0</voice_mono>
    <entrycount>1</entrycount>
    <entries>
    <entry parent="0" duration="1" volume_left="0.1" volume_right="0.1" beatfreq="3.9" basefreq="220" state="1"/>
    </entries>
    </voice>
    </schedule>
    

    You could try that out by

    1) opening Gnaural
    2) menu File->Edit
    3) paste the code in whatever editor pops up on your platform, click "Save"
    4) menu File->Revert

    Btw, if an editor doesn't pop up by default on your system, just use "notepad" or "edit" or whatever simple text editor you have and do that step manually.

    Now, for comparison, this could be achieved even more simply by just making it using Gnaural itself:
    1) File->New
    2) with mouse cursor in the graph, press keyboard combo Ctrl-A
    3) rignt-click over an empty part of the graph, in the dialog that pops up enter 220 for base freq, 3.9 for beat.

    That will give you exactly what i just pasted for you. Point here is that by changing 2 numbers - the base and the beat - you have everything you need to explore those specific frequencies.

    As for what base frequencies to use -> personally, i find it arbitrary enough that usually i just have a descending base freq in the normal part of our auditory range in order to make sure my ear isn't listening to one specific sine wave too long. This is because i am very cautious about my hearing, and i things like trucks backing up, airport carts, smoke-alarm detectors, etc., having high-volume pure sine-wave output at one frequency, in theory burn those frequencies of your hearing out; consequently, i keep Gnaural base frequencies constantly moving and low-volume. And i've been using BBs for nearly 20 years without any noticeable hearing loss.

     
  • gnaural

    gnaural - 2011-04-18

    ps - step 4) of my gnaural instructions should be "put 0 in the times to repeat box and then press Enter" so it runs forever

     
  • Anonymous - 2011-06-15

    As for what base frequencies to use -> personally, i find it arbitrary enough that usually i just have a descending base freq in the normal part of our auditory range in order to make sure my ear isn't listening to one specific sine wave too long. This is because i am very cautious about my hearing, and i things like trucks backing up, airport carts, smoke-alarm detectors, etc., having high-volume pure sine-wave output at one frequency, in theory burn those frequencies of your hearing out; consequently, i keep Gnaural base frequencies constantly moving and low-volume. And i've been using BBs for nearly 20 years without any noticeable hearing loss.

    Hi,

    I was alarmed by reading this. Do you mean that the ear are physically damaged by this or is it a brain adjustment to screen out the sound frequencies repeated?

    If I listen to non moving but constant frequency binaurals, would I have this kind of issue with my hearing?

    Do you know of any documentation or reports of this happening to others?

    Great program by the way, I bought it off android market, to study better presumably.

    Thanks!
    André

     
  • gnaural

    gnaural - 2011-06-15

    Hi André, thanks for the support! And no, i know of no literature per se suggesting my hearing gets selectively burned out by truck back-up alarms and airport terminal vehicles (two sound sources that, in the US at least, have extremely high volume singe frequency sine output, as opposed to, say, ambulance sirens). But it seems self-evident as a risk to me, and i am extremely cautious about my hearing (i am a musician), so i take what i see as precautions: keep volumes low and pitch constantly shifting.

    The issue is that at very high volumes any sound is bad, and if you compare pink noise to a pure sine waves source, that latter would deliver all of it's energy for the entire duration to specific receiving sites in the cochlea, whereas pink noise would distribute it equally for extremely short durations to all sites in the cochlea. Logically, i'd see the pure sine source would be more destructive, therefor i a) keep sound levels low (below destructive volumes) and b) keep the sine source constantly shifting so the duration component is taken out of the equation.

    That said, the first 15 years or so i used BBs i didn't implement this reasoning, and for the first few years had it way too loud too. I appear to have perfectly normal hearing. For a rock musician at least.

     

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