Bandwidth Computation

2007-05-08
2013-05-01
  • Ng Sheaufeng

    Ng Sheaufeng - 2007-05-08

    Representing an interested company in providing web conferencing hosting solution, I am now evaluating DimDim as a potential option. Since DimDim is based on a Browser/Server and not peer-to-peer architecture, it is critical to plan costing to set up DimDim Server where the data center meter by bandwidth usage. Would apprecate if the developer can provide the rule of thumb of bandwidth requirement for each client connection (audio, video, desktop sharing, application sharing) to the server.

    The other information needed is how to compute the RAM requirement at the server for each Presenter and/or Attendees? Does the DimDim Server reserve any RAM for each active connection? If not, when Server is running low/out of RAM, does it block further connection?

    Regards,
    Ng Sheaufeng
    Malaysia

     
    • Rajesh Dharmalingam

      Hello Ng Sheaufeng,

      Thanks for using Dimdim. Could you please mail Sundar at sundar(@)dimdim.com who is the Director of Product Management of Dimdim. He will provide you more inputs on the details.

      Regards,
      -Rajesh

       
    • Rajesh Dharmalingam

      Hi,

      Regarding the bandwidth - Who ever starts or joins the meeting requires a minimum of 150 Kbps. It can vary, if you are doing audio/video along with Desktop sharing or application sharing. But only requirement related to bandwidth is a minimum of 150Kbps upload/download speed for both Presenter and Attendee.

      Regarding the RAM, only the Dimdim server needs to have a minimum RAM of 512 MB.

      Please do let us know if you have more queries.

      Regards,
      -Rajesh

       
    • Ng Sheaufeng

      Ng Sheaufeng - 2007-05-09

      Hi Raj,

      Thanks for a quick response. I've emailed Sundar the same question on April 26 before posting them here but haven't got any reply from him. I'll contact him on the Partnership Network Programme if we decided to go for DimDim.

      Anyway, based on the "minimum" computation, every 10 users would require 1Mbps! ==> 100Mbps can support no more then 1000 users on multiple Presenter/Attendee sessions which is going to be costly when more features are in use...

      My questions:
      (1) It there any way to further reduce the bandwidth requirement, for example using commercial grade codec?

      (2) Do you have a comparison chart for DimDim against other web conferencing solutions in the bandwidth usage?

      Regards,
      Ng Sheaufeng

       
      • DD Ganguly

        DD Ganguly - 2007-05-11

        Hi Ng,

        Please note that 100 kbps is the max bandwidth that's required. This is not used on a persistent basis. For example, if you start desktop sharing at that time 100kbps will be used and then less bandwidth is required.

        To find out bandwidth in your usage scenario. You can check out the bandwidth usage by using WireShark (a network monitor) on your machine. Or you could simply use the networking tab windows task manager.

        You might find that in your usage scenario (say: powerpoint + audio + chat) the bandwidth needed is significantly less.

        1and1.com, servpath.com and many others provide cost effective hosting solutions.

        ddg

         
    • Rajesh Dharmalingam

      Hi Ng Sheaufeng,

      Please do let me know if my understanding is correct?
      Each person(person's machine) whether he is a presenter or an attendee, requires a minimum of 150Kbps only. So, if all are in the same LAN and if they use a single bandwidth, they would require 1Mbps for 10 persons at one point of time?

      I will update you more on this.

      Regards,
      -rajesh

       
    • dimdim_sundar

      dimdim_sundar - 2007-05-10

      Hello Ng Sheaufeng,
      Can we please setup a call to answer your queries? What date/time would you prefer? My email is sundar(@)dimdim.com.
      Regards,
      ~sundar

       

Log in to post a comment.

Get latest updates about Open Source Projects, Conferences and News.

Sign up for the SourceForge newsletter:

JavaScript is required for this form.





No, thanks