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#264 Twitter Login for Online Geometry Viewer (OGV)

Incomplete
open
nobody
5
2014-04-17
2014-04-10
No

I have implemented Twitter Login for the Online Geometry Viewer.
I created a Twitter application and used it's API credentials for testing purpose.

Files modified: accounts/auth.php, accounts/include/style.css

Files added: accounts/complete_twitter_login.php, accounts/include/twitter/OAuth.php, accounts/include/twitter/twitteroauth.php, accounts/login.php, accounts/twitter_login.php, images/sign-in-with-twitter-gray.png, accounts/include/twitter/twitter_config.php

NB: The Twitter API Key and secret can be modified in 'accounts/include/twitter/twitter_config.php'.

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Discussion

  • Sean Morrison

    Sean Morrison - 2014-04-17

    In reviewing this code, it looks to be substantially / predominantly copied from elsewhere on the web. Aside from being unclear on that code's license, most disturbingly you do not provide any attribution of other sourcing and submit this patch as your own work. That is paramount plagiarism.

     
  • Sean Morrison

    Sean Morrison - 2014-04-17
    • Description has changed:

    Diff:

    --- old
    +++ new
    @@ -1,4 +1,3 @@
    -
     I have implemented Twitter Login for the Online Geometry Viewer.
     I created a Twitter application and used it's API credentials for testing purpose.
    
     
  • Quincy Kwende

    Quincy Kwende - 2014-04-17

    Hello Sean,

    I didn't mean to be unclear or claim the work belongs to me, I tried to implement a patch and show my ability on how to work with already implemented codes. My source is https://github.com/swooingfish/login-facebook-twitter.

    I tried not to alter any credit; For instance, you would find credit to Abraham Williams (abraham@abrah.am) http://abrah.am in the following location ~accounts/include/twitter/twitteroauth.php

    Thanks for reviewing

     
  • Sean Morrison

    Sean Morrison - 2014-04-17

    Working in Open Source is centered around community and communication. People working in Open Source at generally not paid for their efforts. What they are compensated with is credit and attribution. Lacking that credit, whether intentional or not is basically a form of theft. Not of the code itself, but of the credit they was due to them, their reputation, and the merits of their work.

    There is nothing wrong in working with others' code but you must always ALWAYS cite sources, verify copyright/ownership, and permissive licensing. If you cannot find an explicit granting of use, then by default you cannot use code you find on the web (even if it is on github or sourceforge or on some other web page). If you do find code that is clearly licensed for use or in the public domain, you should still cite them as the source and make it very clear what is your code and what is theirs. Always.

     
  • Quincy Kwende

    Quincy Kwende - 2014-04-17

    Thanks for the correction.

     

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