Tag Archives: Project of the Month

July 2016, “Staff Pick” Project of the Month – MediaPortal

For our July “Staff Pick” Project of the Month, we selected MediaPortal, an app that turns your PC into a very advanced MediaCenter / HTPC. The team behind the project shared some thoughts about the project’s history, purpose, and direction.

SourceForge (SF): What made you start this?
MediaPortal Team (MT): MediaPortal was born in 2003 as a Windows port of XBMC (now Kodi). These days we can only guess the motivation behind it was to provide an open source alternative to Windows Media Center.

SF: Has the original vision been achieved?
MT: Absolutely, we achieved the original vision and so much more. MediaPortal is the de facto standard for 10 foot experience on Windows.

SF: Who can benefit the most from your project?
MT: People wanting to replace all the consumer electronics boxes under their TV with just the one Microsoft Windows machine. The idea is that rather than having a DVR, a dedicated gaming console, optical media players or other media boxes you just have one Windows machine that does all that for you. You could even get rid of your cumbersome A/V receiver if you wanted too. Today’s systems like the famous Sonos PlayBar will let you do just that. MediaPortal brings everything together from live TV, to movies, to music, photo slide shows. MediaPortal enables users to make the most of their sophisticated TV sets notably by delivering 4K UHD and 3D content in such a convenient way.

SF: What core need does MediaPortal fulfill?
MT: At the core of MediaPortal is the live TV, time shifting and recording functionalities, quite simply it’s the best DVR out there. You also get movie and music management functionalities and so much more through our vibrant community of plug-in developers, notably giving you access to all sorts of online video and music services.

SF: How can we get the most out of using MediaPortal?
MT: Get involved with the community. Share your ideas, software and hardware projects on our forums, publish your own plug-in or even contribute to the core code base. Thus you will yourself forge the future of this great project.

SF: What has your project team done to help build and nurture your community?
MT: We have a really strong team of passionate and friendly individuals who manage to come together release after release and year after year, to deliver an extraordinary product. The key to MediaPortal success is the openness, the attention to detail and the dedicated staff forming this fantastic community.

SF: Have you all found that more frequent releases helps build up your community of users?
MT: Definitely, in fact it’s the key to a stable product and user satisfaction.

SF: What was the first big thing that happened for your project?
MT: It’s really hard for us to tell. This project has been running since 2003 and most of the original staff is long gone already. That’s probably the greatest strength of Team MediaPortal: it’s ability to renew itself both at the technology level and at the human level.

SF: What helped make that happen?
MT: Team MediaPortal was able to renew itself thanks to staff dedicated to the maintenance and betterment of our online facilities.

SF: How has SourceForge and its tools helped your project reach that success?
MT: SourceForge is an essential part of MediaPortal’s online presence. It helps give this project better visibility drawing users and potential contributors to our community.

SF: What is the next big thing for MediaPortal?
MT: Team MediaPortal’s major projects are MP1, MP2 and our TV service. We are continually working toward improving those products.
We are notably working toward adding MadVR support to MP1.
MP2 is making the final run toward its first golden release.
TV service is also getting a most anticipated new release following some major refactoring.

SF: How long do you think that will take?
MT: As long as it needs to.
MP1 is usually getting 3 to 4 releases a year.
MP2 should be starting a regular release schedule this year too.
The TV service (which is currently distributed as part of our MP client) should also be getting its own release schedule from next year.

SF: Do you have the resources you need to make that happen?
MT: Not quite, so anyone is welcome to join the community to help make it happen faster.
Good projects are always looking for talented contributors.

SF: If you had to do it over again, what would you do differently for MediaPortal?
MT: Well we are doing it all over again with MP2, it delivers a much improved architecture enabling great functionalities such as Picture In Picture (PIP) also called MultiView.

SF: Is there anything else we should know?
MT: We are working on better BD-J support and MadVR rendering.
We would like to support HbbTV and other great features but we would need to staff up to make it happen.
It would be fantastic if we could strike up deals with content providers to implement their DRM policies and officially support them.
Be able to run MediaPortal on ReactOS would be great too, though we don’t have the resources to make it happen yet.

[ Download MediaPortal ]

July 2016, “Community Choice” Project of the Month – iDempiere

For our July “Community Choice” Project of the Month, the community elected iDempiere, a Business Suite ERP/CRM/SCM done the community way. Project leader Carlos Antonio Ruiz Gomez shared some thoughts about the project’s history, purpose, and direction.

SourceForge (SF): Tell me about the iDempiere project please.
Carlos Ruiz Gomez (CRG): iDempiere is a complete Open Source ERP/CRM/SCM business solution for small-medium enterprises. It provides inventory management, order processing, accounting, reporting, customer relationship management. Full multi* software, multi-lingual, multi-organization, multi-tenant, multi-accounting, multi-currency.
The system has been designed in a way that changes are easy, even in production, allowing a fast implementation.
User interface can be adapted easily via an application dictionary that feeds a UI and a reporting engine.
Stable, based on Compiere which was SourceForge POTM in February 2004.
At this moment iDempiere is perhaps the only open source ERP done the community way.

SF: What made you start this?
CRG: I enjoy writing code, solving problems, helping others to solve their problems, I can do that as a passion, as a hobby; and I had strong background on business software. With this open source ERP I found a way to join my background with my passion.

SF: Has the original vision been achieved?
CRG: Yes, iDempiere is a real software used in production in thousands of companies worldwide, with a strong community. We have further vision and goals to achieve, but I can say the original idea has been achieved successfully.

SF: Who can benefit the most from your project?
CRG: All companies can benefit from iDempiere. The ERP brings control and organization. Companies using iDempiere avoid the big licensing costs associated with ERP and have complete control about adapting to their own requirements.

SF: What core need does iDempiere fulfill?
CRG: Managing the business and automating many back office functions related to technology, services and human resources. iDempiere ERP integrates operations from the whole company, including purchases, sales, inventory management, customer relationship, accounting.

SF: What’s the best way to get the most out of using iDempiere?
CRG: Implementing ERP is always a big project, although iDempiere is stable and usable out of the box, we strongly recommend companies wanting to use it to hire a known company with experience on ERP implementations.

SF: What has your project team done to help build and nurture your community?
CRG: The iDempiere community is strong, we usually hold in-person conferences bi-yearly, IRC meetings weekly, and constant communication via forums and other messaging mechanisms.
Credit attribution is a key value of our community and that’s why we usually recognize and [give] thanks to Jorg Janke as the creator of this amazing software and ideas, and we like to recognize the improvements that community added in Adempiere project, and also the learning that failing that project gave us to set up properly the community in iDempiere.

SF: Have you all found that more frequent releases helps build up your community of users?
CRG: Yes, we have been releasing official milestone versions every year, but thanks to continuous integration and with big help of SourceForge as our master release repository we are able to release automatically daily stable and development versions.

SF: What was the first big thing that happened for your project?
CRG: We started the project in 2011, during 2012 Trek Global (company based in Vancouver, USA) held a conference with the key developers and we created a big wish-list with all kinds of things that we hated from the previous software and things that we wanted to add or improve to make the software more robust, multi-tenant and usable. After that, Trek Global sponsored a big team of analysts, developers and testers during more than 1 year to solve most of the list. That represented a big jump on the quality, robustness and usability of the application.

SF: What helped make that happen?
CRG: Trek Global believed in our vision of the project and community setup and decided to sponsor this big jump to make this software the best in its class.

SF: How has SourceForge and its tools helped your project reach that success?
CRG: The hosting capabilities of SourceForge are by far the best at this moment, we made a judicious comparison against other open source hosting providers and found that the tools provided by SourceForge to distribute files are the best in its class, as well as the mirroring, speed of upload/download and statistics. All these capabilities have been key to helping us provide better services to our community.

SF: What is the next big thing for iDempiere?
CRG: iDempiere has a long term goal about modularity. Our main goal is to have a light core and separate all the business logic to be pluggable, extendable and replaceable. The project keeps evolving and achieving this shift will represent a big jump.

SF: How long do you think that will take?
CRG: As a long term goal it can take some time to achieve it, although our previous experience has demonstrated that with proper sponsorship these big goals can be achieved a lot faster.

SF: Do you have the resources you need to make that happen?
CRG: Not at this moment, we are in need of additional commitment and sponsorship to achieve those big goals.

SF: If you had to do it over again, what would you do differently for iDempiere?
CRG: We already passed that phase of redoing the project. I’m also one of the founders of Adempiere project and we learned from the failures on the community setup.
iDempiere project and its success is a consequence of the new setup, we fixed key things like ownership, decentralized version control, respect for community, protection for key contributors, and other values that have resulted in a successful and thriving project.

SF: Is there anything else we should know?
CRG: It is very pleasant for me to see iDempiere as project of the month on SourceForge, my involvement on the former Compiere project was precisely because of the mention on SourceForge on February of 2004. Since then and thanks to this community activity on SourceForge I started studying the software and fell in love with the architecture and design, not just as an ERP but as a full featured fast development framework.

Carlos Antonio Ruiz Gomez is one of the Project Leaders of iDempiere alongside Heng Sin Low. Their key developers are Hiệp lê quý , Nicolas Micoud and Redhuan Daniel Oon .

[ Download iDempiere ]

“Community Choice” Project of the Month Vote – August 2016

The vote for August 2016 Community Choice SourceForge Project of the Month is now available, and will run until July 15, 2016 12:00 UTC.


SQuirreL SQL Client

SQuirreL SQL Client is a graphical SQL client written in Java that will allow you to view the structure of a JDBC compliant database, browse the data in tables, issue SQL commands etc.
[ Download SQuirreL SQL Client ]


UltraDefrag

UltraDefrag is a disk defragmenter for Windows, which supports defragmentation of locked system files by running during the boot process. It is easy to use without any complicated scripting or a huge load of configuration settings. You can filter the files processed by size, number of fragments, file name and path. You can terminate the process early by specifying an execution time limit.
[ Download UltraDefrag ]


Cyberfox

Cyberfox is a Mozilla-based Internet browser designed to take advantage of 64-bit architecture but a 32-bit version is also available. The application provides a higher performance when navigating your favorite pages. Compatible Windows Operating Systems: Windows 7/7 SP1 OS x86|x64 Windows 8/8.x OS x86|x64 Windows 10 OS x86|x64 (Windows XP Unsupported, Windows Vista Unsupported) Dedicated support forums. https://8pecxstudios.com/Forums/index.php Dedicated Contact Forms. https://cyberfox.8pecxstudios.com/contact-us Profile Buddy: Transfer your profile from any Mozilla base browser. https://8pecxstudios.com/Forums/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=350 Tell us what you think and write a review.
[ Download Cyberfox ]


SynWrite add-ons

Collection of add-ons for SynWrite editor.
[ Download SynWrite add-ons ]


Eclipse Tomcat Plugin

The Eclipse Tomcat Plugin provides simple integration of a tomcat servlet container for the development of java web applications. This project is a fork of the original Sysdeo Tomcat Plugin. Please use http://tomcatplugin.sf.net/update for installation.
[ Download Eclipse Tomcat Plugin ]


SWIG

SWIG is a software development tool that connects programs written in C and C++ with a variety of high-level programming languages. SWIG is used with different types of target languages including common scripting languages such as Javascript, Perl, PHP, Python, Tcl and Ruby. The list of supported languages also includes non-scripting languages such as C#, Common Lisp (CLISP, Allegro CL, CFFI, UFFI), D, Go language, Java, Lua, Modula-3, OCAML, Octave, R and Scilab. Also several interpreted and compiled Scheme implementations (Guile, MzScheme/Racket, Chicken) are supported. SWIG is most commonly used to create high-level interpreted or compiled programming environments, user interfaces, and as a tool for testing and prototyping C/C++ software. SWIG is typically used to parse C/C++ interfaces and generate the ‘glue code’ required for the above target languages to call into the C/C++ code. SWIG can also export its parse tree in the form of XML and Lisp s-expressions.
[ Download SWIG ]


FileBot

FileBot is the ultimate tool for renaming your movies, tv shows or anime and downloading subtitles. It’s smart, streamlined for simplicity and just works. FileBot supports Windows, Linux and Mac, plus there’s a full-featured command-line interface for all sorts of automation.
[ Download FileBot ]


Smoothwall

Smoothwall is a best-of-breed Internet firewall/router, designed to run on commodity hardware and to provide an easy-to-use administration interface to those using it. Built using open source and Free software, it’s distributed under the GNU Public License.
[ Download Smoothwall ]


Manjaro Community Torrents

This project is for download the Manjaro Officials and Community releases using a bittorrent client (console or graphical)
[ Download Manjaro Community Torrents ]

June 2016, “Staff Pick” Project of the Month – Pandora FMS

For our June “Staff Pick” Project of the Month, we selected Pandora FMS, a flexible monitoring system ready for big environments. Sancho Lerena and Axel Amigo, the people behind the project shared some thoughts about the project’s history, purpose, and direction.

SourceForge (SF): What made you start this?
Pandora FMS (PF): First of all I would like to thank you for this opportunity! We are very excited to be part of the selected projects for June.

Back in 2003, Sancho Lerena (current CEO of Ártica ST, vendors of Pandora FMS) was working as a senior specialist consultant in one of the biggest banks of Spain. He found that the in-place monitoring lacked several aspects, and a lot of time and human resources were being spent because of it. One year later, in August 2004, the first public version was published (v 0.8).

SF: Has the original vision been achieved?
PF: Yes, and much more. In almost 12 years, we’ve improved a lot from our first approach. Now we know that “monitoring” today involves much more than classical servers or network: now we are talking about ITOM, BAM and APM. Pandora’s capabilities today are far from those of the first version, and we will continue improving our vision and features with each version.

SF: Who can benefit the most from your project?
PF: Pandora FMS is an all-purpose monitoring solution, focused on ITOM, APM and BAM mainly. It can be used by Open Source users who want to monitor a Raspberry, to SMB’s with a small datacenter, and even MSP’s to provide monitoring as a Service (MaaS). And also in a pure on-premise deployment in huge companies like Rakuten- that’s one of our best success stories.

SF: What core need does Pandora fulfill?
PF: ITOM, APM and BAM: Which means IT operation infrastructure, application performance monitoring, and business activity monitoring. In IT we love acronyms 🙂

SF: How can we get the most out of using Pandora?
PF: We are SO Open Source, we have a really big documentation available online, videos, tutorials, quicksteps and easy ways to install. We also are now offering a free Pandora FMS training + certification to companies which want to offer Pandora FMS Opensource as base for their services. More information [http://pandorafms.org/en/community/Affiliate-business-program]

SF: What has your project team done to help build and nurture your community?
PF: We’ve always listened through our forums, and recently we’ve opened an Ambassador program [http://pandorafms.org/en/community/ambass] to allow the power users of the Open Source edition with a dedicated site on the web.

SF: Have you all found that more frequent releases helps build up your community of users?
PF: In fact, yes. More releases means more features and improvements and new technologies to monitor, which increases the size of the community.

SF: What was the first big thing that happened for your project?
PF: Our biggest challenge was to deploy Pandora FMS in Rakuten (see Rakuten case study), it was a very complex scenario with almost 10,000 devices.

SF: What helped make that happen?
PF: We absolutely owe this big success to our most loyal Partner: Rworks, from Japan. Without their invaluable help, we would not have stood a chance. They also developed the code, so this is a cooperation in all levels: commercial and in development.

SF: How has SourceForge and its tools helped your project reach that success?
PF: SourceForge for us is the main platform for Open Source distribution, which has helped us reach millions of users throughout our history.

SF: What is the next big thing for Pandora FMS?
PF: We are introducing a new version this year, which will adopt the “rolling-release” cycle, that will allow us to add more features to the product more frequently, without the need for tedious migrations.

SF: How long do you think that will take?
PF: We will start releasing RC versions in Q2 this year, with the final stable version planned for mid Q3.

SF: Do you have the resources you need to make that happen?
PF: Absolutely yes! Thanks to our community and our clients, we are a 10 year old solid Software company.

SF: If you had to do it over again, what would you do differently for Pandora?
PF: As with many software projects, we would like to have more automated tests from the beginning. Sometimes you leave that as a TO-DO task, and building a testing framework of a legacy project takes a lot of time and resources.

[ Download Pandora FMS ]

June 2016, “Community Choice” Project of the Month – Movistartv

For our June “Community Choice” Project of the Month, the community elected Movistartv, an add on for XBMC/Kodi that allows for a virtual Movistar + TV decoder for different OS. Victor Juidiaz, the developer of Movistartv, shared some thoughts about the project’s history, purpose, and direction.

SourceForge (SF): What made you start this?
Victor Juidiaz (VJ): At the beginning I bought the raspberry just for fun, and to use it as a media center.

Then I realized I could incorporate the IPTV Movistar decoder as another functionality of the media center.

I installed TVheadend on the raspberry but there were too many functionalities that were exclusive of the operator (cloud recordings, automatic channel search…) so I decided to develop a specific element only for this operator by myself.

SF: Has the original vision been achieved?
VJ: Yes indeed. The initial project was not so ambitious, but now and then new ideas emerged and I introduced them, improving, in some cases, the operator’s own functionalities… but it’s always possible to improve even more.

SF: Who can benefit the most from your project?
VJ: Any of the Movistar TV users (more than 2 million users at present).

SF: What is required to make Movistartv work?
VJ: Actually the requirements are quite limited. It works through Kodi, so it can even work with the Raspberry limitations.

SF: What’s the best way to get the most out of using Movistartv?
VJ: The best way is by installing it and integrating it with the Kodi repository and adding the recorded series to the local repository or to the cloud (used as a video repository, with a scrapper for TV series).

SF: What has your project team done to help build and nurture your community?
VJ: This project is somewhat atypical, since it wasn’t initially planned as a team project but as a personal one, so in fact it is a personal challenge to me. It is also a way to acquire knowledge of other languages (c++ and python) and a way of self-learning.
The team coordination has been done day by day, at work. But now it should be different.

SF: Have you all found that more frequent releases helps build up your community of users?
VJ: The truth is that sometimes the better way to build the community is by meeting the new functionalities that they request. This makes the project improve a lot.

SF: What was the first big thing that happened for your project?
VJ: When it was published something real big happened. It started as a personal “living-room” project for me, for my family and house, and then it became something bigger: I shared it with the whole community.

SF: What helped make that happen?
VJ: Well, I just met a point in which I realized that the functionalities that I offered could even replace the operator’s decoder.

SF: How has SourceForge and its tools helped your project reach that success?
VJ: The opportunity to publish and especially the communication with the users through the forums; those specific forums for queries, questions, answers, comments and so on were so good!

SF: What is the next big thing for Movistartv?
VJ: Right now I am working on a sports “multicamera” machine, on a short term project. On a longer term project I would like to develop a way for all the clients connected to a remote server of MovistarTV, to connect from everywhere, I mean from any location.

SF: How long do you think that will take?
VJ: At the end of the year I expect the transition to a client-server architecture to be complete.

SF: Do you have the resources you need to make that happen?
VJ: Sure, but the main problem here is the spare time I need for this. But I have the knowledge to start it, and I enjoy the research part and learning more.

SF: If you had to do it over again, is there anything you would do differently with Movistartv?
VJ: No.

SF: Is there anything else we should know?
VJ: Only that my wife and daughter have been really patient and I want to thank them for that. Also thank them for the time I’ve had for the development of the project. Thank you for enduring all the restarts and errors and the testing of the different versions of it.
The success of this project is mostly due to their patience.

[ Download Movistartv ]