This year's conference was littered with talk and demos on SOA, ESB, Web Services, orchestration etc.
I started to think about service-oriented architectures as an architectural style and how it compares to prior styles, such as distributed component architectures.
Are patterns meant to be codified as components? It is also equally hotly debated. Mary Jane Queen learned this arrangement of Pretty Saro from her family of old-time Western North Carolina ballad singers.
Today, I 'd like to share my view on state and lessness. Authentic mountain music sample from The Queen Family Western North Carolina mountain folk music CD. Second, as a believer in cross-platform integration, technology-neutral design patterns and peace on earth I want to make sure I switch the koolaid flavor every so often.
In my eyes this is really the best indicator of success for a pattern language. Like any popular concept, it can sometimes cause as much confusion as it provides help.
Invariably, the answer is "it depends". Authentic mountain music sample from The Queen Family Western North Carolina mountain folk music CD.
This style is used a lot by mountain musicians to accompany the singing of ballads and folk songs.
But as so often, overwhelming success can also have a flip side. After a lot of deja-vu in Windows GDI programming I created a toolkit that contains each pattern as a small executable. Acoustic folk music from the Queen Family-Back Porch Music CD. This time I want to share some of the challenges we have found working with loosely coupled architectures and how we addressed them.
This means we got to interact with the product team and play with some pre-beta bits.
While the conference logistics can be quirky at times the content is top notch.
Talking to a few folks who did embrace our language motivated me to take a quick survey of the places where our patterns pop up.