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#264 description of content of <epigraph>

AMBER
closed-accepted
nobody
5
2011-04-24
2011-03-20
Kevin Hawkins
No

Section 4.2.3 (#DSAE) says:

An epigraph is a quotation from some other work appearing on a title page, or at the start of a division. It may be encoded using the special-purpose epigraph element. Its content will generally be a q or quote element, often associated with a bibliographic reference, as in the following example:

but the example of an epigraph given here, as in every other epigraph example I can find, has a child <cit>, which contains a <quote> and <bibl>. I think it's safe to just revise the last sentence to:

Its content will generally be a cit element containing both a quote for the quotation and a bible containing a bibliographic reference, as in the following example:

Discussion

  • Laurent Romary
    Laurent Romary
    2011-03-20

    Fully agree. This would contribute to an ever more homogeneous use of cit all over the guidelines.

     
  • Lou Burnard
    Lou Burnard
    2011-03-20

    I have two problems with this, sorry.

    1. If an <epigraph> can contain only a <cit>, why bother to define it as a distinct element at all? Wouldn't we be better off just using <cit>, and making sure that it can appear in all the places <epigraph> can? what exactly do we gain by nesting a <cit> within an <epigraph>?

    2, But my experience tells me that actually there are things that look very much like epigraphs but which do NOT contain quotations from other works, attributed or otherwise. A classic case is the title page of E M Forster's "Howards End" (1902) , on the title page of which appears the phrase "Only connect". This is not the title, nor is it a quotation from anyone else, it's an epigraph.

    So if there's a fault to be corrected here it is that we don't have a wider range of examples in the Guidelines, in my opinion, not that the specification is insufficiently narrow.

     
  • Lou Burnard
    Lou Burnard
    2011-03-20

    p.s. in fact there is an example of a non-citation-containing epigraph already in the Guidelines, now I look! see the Greene example at the end of #DSBACK

     
  • Lou Burnard
    Lou Burnard
    2011-03-20

    • milestone: --> AMBER
     
  • Kevin Hawkins
    Kevin Hawkins
    2011-03-24

    Regarding Lou's first point, I agree that there is no point in having <epigraph> except as syntactic sugar for <cit type="epigraph">. I was just trying to iron out an inconsistency in our documentation while trying not to break backwards compatibility.

    But I am now convinced that there are epigraphs that do not contain both a quotation (<q> or <quote>) and a bibliographic citation (<bibl>). For clarity, though, I would like to see the following:

    When a bibliographic reference appears, group it with the quotation using cit.

    after

    Its content will generally be a q or quote element, often associated with a bibliographic reference, as in the following example:

     
  • Lou Burnard
    Lou Burnard
    2011-04-24

    • status: open --> closed
     
  • Lou Burnard
    Lou Burnard
    2011-04-24

    Discussion reworded, Forster example added, at rev 8831

     
  • Lou Burnard
    Lou Burnard
    2011-04-24

    • status: closed --> closed-accepted