[8e2213]: System.Data.SQLite / SQLiteDateFormats.cs Maximize Restore History

Download this file

SQLiteDateFormats.cs    31 lines (31 with data), 1.4 kB

 1
 2
 3
 4
 5
 6
 7
 8
 9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
namespace System.Data.SQLite
{
/// <summary>
/// This implementation of SQLite for ADO.NET can process date/time fields in databases in only one of three formats. Ticks, ISO8601
/// and JulianDay.
/// </summary>
/// <remarks>
/// ISO8601 is more compatible, readable, fully-processable, but less accurate as it doesn't provide time down to fractions of a second.
/// JulianDay is the numeric format the SQLite uses internally and is arguably the most compatible with 3rd party tools. It is
/// not readable as text without post-processing.
/// Ticks less compatible with 3rd party tools that query the database, and renders the DateTime field unreadable as text without post-processing.
///
/// The preferred order of choosing a datetime format is JulianDay, ISO8601, and then Ticks. Ticks is mainly present for legacy
/// code support.
/// </remarks>
public enum SQLiteDateFormats
{
/// <summary>
/// Using ticks is not recommended and is not well supported with LINQ.
/// </summary>
Ticks = 0,
/// <summary>
/// The default format for this provider.
/// </summary>
ISO8601 = 1,
/// <summary>
/// JulianDay format, which is what SQLite uses internally
/// </summary>
JulianDay = 2
}
}