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Discussion - 14 years on, should 7zip use IEC? not JEDEC KiB MiB etc...

2013-07-10
2013-07-16
  • Robert Readman
    Robert Readman
    2013-07-10

    Hello,

    Here is one I thought I would add to open discussion for Igor to decide, its a small change, but hopefully will be accepted.
    Back in 2000 the IEC (International Electro-technical Commission) established the new unit for multiples of bytes.

    This was because MB (Megabyte) referred to 1024 KB (Kilobyte), years and years ago this changed with SI, so kilo=1000 as with the decimal metric.
    MiB (Mebibyte) was created to refer correctly to 1024 KiB, there are still many using the old way (Windows included), and many finally starting to do it correctly.

    I vote in favour that 7zip updates the labels to use IEC units to clearly state the sizes it refers.
    This is to stop assuming MB = 1024KiB, and to make clear it doesn't mean MB = 1000.

    If "2 MB" file size is actually 2097152 bytes then I think 7zip should label it "2 MiB".
    The transfer speed of "15 MB/s" should be changed to "15 MiB/s" for accuracy.

    When using 7zip all the labels should be correctly displayed.

    There is lots on the internet regarding this, and I know many users simply won't care, however for those that do, this change will help, and hopefully educate others.

    Not sure why floppy is 1457664 bytes in the "Split to volumes, bytes:" section...
    To explain in an example, a "1.44MB" floppy meant 1.44 MB 3 1/2-inch HD disks have the "M" prefix peculiar to their context, coming from their capacity of 2,880 512-byte sectors (1,440 KiB), inconsistent with either a decimal megabyte nor a binary mebibyte (MiB).
    Hence, these disks hold 1.47 MB or 1.41 MiB
    Which is why I am glad, in the "Split to volumes, bytes:" section it states 1457664 - 3.5" floppy
    However not sure why exactly 1457664 bytes, when a floppy is 1474560 bytes.

    Igor could we please correct this issue, and display the units so they are 100% clear to exact meaning.

    +1 vote from me to start it off.

    Many Thanks,

    Robert Readman.

     
  • +1