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;;;; This file contains some parameterizations of various VM
;;;; attributes for the x86. This file is separate from other stuff so
;;;; that it can be compiled and loaded earlier.
;;;; This software is part of the SBCL system. See the README file for
;;;; more information.
;;;;
;;;; This software is derived from the CMU CL system, which was
;;;; written at Carnegie Mellon University and released into the
;;;; public domain. The software is in the public domain and is
;;;; provided with absolutely no warranty. See the COPYING and CREDITS
;;;; files for more information.
(in-package "SB!VM")
;;; ### Note: we simultaneously use ``word'' to mean a 32 bit quantity
;;; and a 16 bit quantity depending on context. This is because Intel
;;; insists on calling 16 bit things words and 32 bit things
;;; double-words (or dwords). Therefore, in the instruction definition
;;; and register specs, we use the Intel convention. But whenever we
;;; are talking about stuff the rest of the lisp system might be
;;; interested in, we use ``word'' to mean the size of a descriptor
;;; object, which is 32 bits.
;;;; machine architecture parameters
;;; the number of bits per word, where a word holds one lisp descriptor
(def!constant n-word-bits 32)
;;; the natural width of a machine word (as seen in e.g. register width,
;;; address space)
(def!constant n-machine-word-bits 32)
;;; the number of bits per byte, where a byte is the smallest
;;; addressable object
(def!constant n-byte-bits 8)
;;; The minimum immediate offset in a memory-referencing instruction.
(def!constant minimum-immediate-offset (- (expt 2 31)))
;;; The maximum immediate offset in a memory-referencing instruction.
(def!constant maximum-immediate-offset (1- (expt 2 31)))
(def!constant float-sign-shift 31)
;;; comment from CMU CL:
;;; These values were taken from the alpha code. The values for
;;; bias and exponent min/max are not the same as shown in the 486 book.
;;; They may be correct for how Python uses them.
(def!constant single-float-bias 126) ; Intel says 127.
(defconstant-eqx single-float-exponent-byte (byte 8 23) #'equalp)
(defconstant-eqx single-float-significand-byte (byte 23 0) #'equalp)
;;; comment from CMU CL:
;;; The 486 book shows the exponent range -126 to +127. The Lisp
;;; code that uses these values seems to want already biased numbers.
(def!constant single-float-normal-exponent-min 1)
(def!constant single-float-normal-exponent-max 254)
(def!constant single-float-hidden-bit (ash 1 23))
(def!constant single-float-trapping-nan-bit (ash 1 22))
(def!constant double-float-bias 1022)
(defconstant-eqx double-float-exponent-byte (byte 11 20) #'equalp)
(defconstant-eqx double-float-significand-byte (byte 20 0) #'equalp)
(def!constant double-float-normal-exponent-min 1)
(def!constant double-float-normal-exponent-max #x7FE)
(def!constant double-float-hidden-bit (ash 1 20))
(def!constant double-float-trapping-nan-bit (ash 1 19))
(def!constant long-float-bias 16382)
(defconstant-eqx long-float-exponent-byte (byte 15 0) #'equalp)
(defconstant-eqx long-float-significand-byte (byte 31 0) #'equalp)
(def!constant long-float-normal-exponent-min 1)
(def!constant long-float-normal-exponent-max #x7FFE)
(def!constant long-float-hidden-bit (ash 1 31)) ; actually not hidden
(def!constant long-float-trapping-nan-bit (ash 1 30))
(def!constant single-float-digits
(+ (byte-size single-float-significand-byte) 1))
(def!constant double-float-digits
(+ (byte-size double-float-significand-byte) n-word-bits 1))
(def!constant long-float-digits
(+ (byte-size long-float-significand-byte) n-word-bits 1))
;;; pfw -- from i486 microprocessor programmer's reference manual
(def!constant float-invalid-trap-bit (ash 1 0))
(def!constant float-denormal-trap-bit (ash 1 1))
(def!constant float-divide-by-zero-trap-bit (ash 1 2))
(def!constant float-overflow-trap-bit (ash 1 3))
(def!constant float-underflow-trap-bit (ash 1 4))
(def!constant float-inexact-trap-bit (ash 1 5))
(def!constant float-round-to-nearest 0)
(def!constant float-round-to-negative 1)
(def!constant float-round-to-positive 2)
(def!constant float-round-to-zero 3)
(def!constant float-precision-24-bit 0)
(def!constant float-precision-53-bit 2)
(def!constant float-precision-64-bit 3)
(defconstant-eqx float-rounding-mode (byte 2 10) #'equalp)
(defconstant-eqx float-sticky-bits (byte 6 16) #'equalp)
(defconstant-eqx float-traps-byte (byte 6 0) #'equalp)
(defconstant-eqx float-exceptions-byte (byte 6 16) #'equalp)
(defconstant-eqx float-precision-control (byte 2 8) #'equalp)
(def!constant float-fast-bit 0) ; no fast mode on x86
;;;; description of the target address space
;;; where to put the different spaces
;;;
;;; Note: Mostly these values are black magic, inherited from CMU CL
;;; without any documentation. However, there were a few explanatory
;;; comments in the CMU CL sources:
;;; * On Linux,
;;; ** The space 0x08000000-0x10000000 is "C program and memory allocation".
;;; ** The space 0x40000000-0x48000000 is reserved for shared libs.
;;; ** The space >0xE0000000 is "C stack - Alien stack".
;;; * On FreeBSD,
;;; ** The space 0x0E000000-0x10000000 is "Foreign segment".
;;; ** The space 0x20000000-0x30000000 is reserved for shared libs.
;;; And there have been some changes since the fork from CMU CL:
;;; * The OpenBSD port is new since the fork. We started with
;;; the FreeBSD address map, which actually worked until the
;;; Alpha port patches, for reasons which in retrospect are rather
;;; mysterious. After the Alpha port patches were added, the
;;; OpenBSD port suffered memory corruption problems. While
;;; debugging those, it was discovered that src/runtime/trymap
;;; failed for the control stack region #x40000000-#x47fff000.
;;; After the control stack was moved upward out of this region
;;; (stealing some bytes from dynamic space) the problems went
;;; away.
;;; * The FreeBSD STATIC-SPACE-START value was bumped up from
;;; #x28000000 to #x30000000 when FreeBSD ld.so dynamic linking
;;; support was added for FreeBSD ca. 20000910. This was to keep from
;;; stomping on an address range that the dynamic libraries want to
;;; use. (They want to use this address range even if we try to
;;; reserve it with a call to validate() as the first operation in
;;; main().)
;;; * For NetBSD 2.0, the following ranges are used by normal
;;; executables and mmap:
;;; ** Executables are (by default) loaded at 0x08048000.
;;; ** The break for the sbcl runtime seems to end around 0x08400000
;;; We set read only space around 0x20000000, static
;;; space around 0x30000000, all ending below 0x37fff000
;;; ** ld.so and other mmap'ed stuff like shared libs start around
;;; 0x48000000
;;; We set dynamic space between 0x60000000 and 0x98000000
;;; ** Bottom of the stack is typically not below 0xb0000000
;;; FYI, this can be looked at with the "pmap" program, and if you
;;; set the top-down mmap allocation option in the kernel (not yet
;;; the default), all bets are totally off!
;;; * For FreeBSD, the requirement of user and kernel space are
;;; getting larger, and users tend to extend them.
;;; If MAXDSIZ is extended from 512MB to 1GB, we can't use up to
;;; around 0x50000000.
;;; And if KVA_PAGES is extended from 1GB to 1.5GB, we can't use
;;; down to around 0xA0000000.
;;; So we use 0x58000000--0x98000000 for dynamic space.
;;; * OpenBSD address space changes for W^X as well as malloc()
;;; randomization made the old addresses unsafe.
;;; ** By default (linked without -Z option):
;;; The executable's text segment starts at #x1c000000 and the
;;; data segment MAXDSIZ bytes higher, at #x3c000000. Shared
;;; library text segments start randomly between #x00002000 and
;;; #x10002000, with the data segment MAXDSIZ bytes after that.
;;; ** If the -Z linker option is used:
;;; The executable's text and data segments simply start at
;;; #x08048000, data immediately following text. Shared library
;;; text and data is placed as if allocated by malloc().
;;; ** In both cases, the randomized range for malloc() starts
;;; MAXDSIZ bytes after the end of the data segment (#x48048000
;;; with -Z, #x7c000000 without), and extends 256 MB.
;;; ** The read only, static, and linkage table spaces should be
;;; safe with and without -Z if they are located just before
;;; #x1c000000.
;;; ** Ideally the dynamic space should be at #x94000000, 64 MB
;;; after the end of the highest random malloc() address.
;;; Unfortunately the dynamic space must be in the lower half
;;; of the address space, where there are no large areas which
;;; are unused both with and without -Z. So we break -Z by
;;; starting at #x40000000. By only using 512 - 64 MB we can
;;; run under the default 512 MB data size resource limit.
#!+win32
(progn
(def!constant read-only-space-start #x22000000)
(def!constant read-only-space-end #x220ff000)
(def!constant static-space-start #x22100000)
(def!constant static-space-end #x221ff000)
(def!constant dynamic-space-start #x22300000)
(def!constant dynamic-space-end (!configure-dynamic-space-end #x42300000))
(def!constant linkage-table-space-start #x22200000)
(def!constant linkage-table-space-end #x222ff000))
#!+linux
(progn
(def!constant read-only-space-start #x01000000)
(def!constant read-only-space-end #x010ff000)
(def!constant static-space-start #x01100000)
(def!constant static-space-end #x011ff000)
(def!constant dynamic-space-start #x09000000)
(def!constant dynamic-space-end (!configure-dynamic-space-end #x29000000))
(def!constant linkage-table-space-start #x01200000)
(def!constant linkage-table-space-end #x012ff000))
#!+sunos
(progn
(def!constant read-only-space-start #x20000000)
(def!constant read-only-space-end #x200ff000)
(def!constant static-space-start #x20100000)
(def!constant static-space-end #x201ff000)
(def!constant dynamic-space-start #x48000000)
(def!constant dynamic-space-end (!configure-dynamic-space-end #xA0000000))
(def!constant linkage-table-space-start #x20200000)
(def!constant linkage-table-space-end #x202ff000))
#!+freebsd
(progn
(def!constant read-only-space-start #x01000000)
(def!constant read-only-space-end #x010ff000)
(def!constant static-space-start #x01100000)
(def!constant static-space-end #x011ff000)
(def!constant dynamic-space-start #x58000000)
(def!constant dynamic-space-end (!configure-dynamic-space-end #x98000000))
(def!constant linkage-table-space-start #x01200000)
(def!constant linkage-table-space-end #x012ff000))
#!+openbsd
(progn
(def!constant read-only-space-start #x1b000000)
(def!constant read-only-space-end #x1b0ff000)
(def!constant static-space-start #x1b100000)
(def!constant static-space-end #x1b1ff000)
(def!constant dynamic-space-start #x40000000)
(def!constant dynamic-space-end (!configure-dynamic-space-end #x5bfff000))
(def!constant linkage-table-space-start #x1b200000)
(def!constant linkage-table-space-end #x1b2ff000))
#!+netbsd
(progn
(def!constant read-only-space-start #x20000000)
(def!constant read-only-space-end #x200ff000)
(def!constant static-space-start #x20100000)
(def!constant static-space-end #x201ff000)
(def!constant dynamic-space-start #x60000000)
(def!constant dynamic-space-end (!configure-dynamic-space-end #x98000000))
;; In CMUCL: 0xB0000000->0xB1000000
(def!constant linkage-table-space-start #x20200000)
(def!constant linkage-table-space-end #x202ff000))
#!+darwin
(progn
(def!constant read-only-space-start #x04000000)
(def!constant read-only-space-end #x040ff000)
(def!constant static-space-start #x04100000)
(def!constant static-space-end #x041ff000)
(def!constant dynamic-space-start #x10000000)
(def!constant dynamic-space-end (!configure-dynamic-space-end #x6ffff000))
(def!constant linkage-table-space-start #x04200000)
(def!constant linkage-table-space-end #x042ff000))
;;; Size of one linkage-table entry in bytes.
(def!constant linkage-table-entry-size 8)
;;; Given that NIL is the first thing allocated in static space, we
;;; know its value at compile time:
(def!constant nil-value (+ static-space-start #xb))
;;;; other miscellaneous constants
(defenum (:start 8)
halt-trap
pending-interrupt-trap
error-trap
cerror-trap
breakpoint-trap
fun-end-breakpoint-trap
single-step-around-trap
single-step-before-trap)
(defenum (:start 24)
object-not-list-trap
object-not-instance-trap)
;;;; static symbols
;;; These symbols are loaded into static space directly after NIL so
;;; that the system can compute their address by adding a constant
;;; amount to NIL.
;;;
;;; The fdefn objects for the static functions are loaded into static
;;; space directly after the static symbols. That way, the raw-addr
;;; can be loaded directly out of them by indirecting relative to NIL.
;;;
;;; pfw X86 doesn't have enough registers to keep these things there.
;;; Note these spaces grow from low to high addresses.
(defvar *allocation-pointer*)
(defvar *binding-stack-pointer*)
(defparameter *static-symbols*
(append
*common-static-symbols*
*c-callable-static-symbols*
'(*alien-stack*
;; interrupt handling
*pseudo-atomic-bits*
*allocation-pointer*
*binding-stack-pointer*
;; the floating point constants
*fp-constant-0d0*
*fp-constant-1d0*
*fp-constant-0f0*
*fp-constant-1f0*
;; The following are all long-floats.
*fp-constant-0l0*
*fp-constant-1l0*
*fp-constant-pi*
*fp-constant-l2t*
*fp-constant-l2e*
*fp-constant-lg2*
*fp-constant-ln2*
;; For GC-AND-SAVE
*restart-lisp-function*
;; For the UNWIND-TO-FRAME-AND-CALL VOP
*unwind-to-frame-function*
;; Needed for callbacks to work across saving cores. see
;; ALIEN-CALLBACK-ASSEMBLER-WRAPPER in c-call.lisp for gory
;; details.
sb!alien::*enter-alien-callback*
;; see comments in ../x86-64/parms.lisp
sb!pcl::..slot-unbound..)))
(defparameter *static-funs*
'(length
sb!kernel:two-arg-+
sb!kernel:two-arg--
sb!kernel:two-arg-*
sb!kernel:two-arg-/
sb!kernel:two-arg-<
sb!kernel:two-arg->
sb!kernel:two-arg-=
eql
sb!kernel:%negate
sb!kernel:two-arg-and
sb!kernel:two-arg-ior
sb!kernel:two-arg-xor
sb!kernel:two-arg-gcd
sb!kernel:two-arg-lcm))
;;;; stuff added by jrd
;;; FIXME: Is this used? Delete it or document it.
;;; cf the sparc PARMS.LISP
(defparameter *assembly-unit-length* 8)