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Powersave for lights-out server setup?

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Mark
2007-06-24
2013-04-08
  • Mark
    Mark
    2007-06-24

    Hi,

    I'm trying to configure my openSuse 10.0 server in such a way that it will suspend to disk automatically after 15 min of no activity (including network activity). I have ACPI and (K)Powersave working but I can't figure out how to configure it to shutdown/suspend automatically on no activity.

    My idea is to create a lights-out setup for the server. I can wake up the server with wake-on-lan (WOL) from one of the clients if I need it. I have got KDE running on the server for remote administration from a client.

    Is it possible to create such a setup with the powersaved?

    Any help appreciated.

    Regards,

    -Mark-

     
    • hi,

      I've seen this is not an active thread but I am courious how you did manage this.
      Personally, kde with kpowersave is much overhead and no good decision in security context.
      If you use powersave (i don't know much about it) there should be some shell-hooks delivered.
      Sorry i can give you no more help but if you managed it let me know how you did it.

      regards, gunnar

       
      • Mark
        Mark
        2008-01-09

        Hello tekknokrat,

        Because there is a lack of support for this kind of setup (as far as I know at least) I came up with the following setup:

        I have created a simple shell script which checks, among other things, the average cpu-load over the last 15 min (with uname). If the load is 0 (no activity in the last 15 minutes) than this script will put the server in a deep sleep state (ACPI state 4 if I remember correctly).
        I run this script as a cron-job which will start the script every 30 minutes or so.

        Furthermore I have configured the network card so that it will react to a wake-on-lan packet by getting the server out of the deep sleep state (most network cards support this).

        On the client machine I use a small tool to send the server a wake-on-lan packet when I need the server. This will result in waking up the server, and if I don't use the server for aproximetly 30 minutes or so, it will go back in the deep sleep state automatically again.

        It's simple and not a very resilient solution, but it works pretty well for me. I have the server setup on the attick and I don't want it to run all day because I don't use it often. This little trick saves me the hazard to go to the attick to switch it on (and off) every time I need it.

        Regards,

        -Mark-