Diff of /PDL/Book/FirstSteps.pod [aa2d63] .. [845b10] Maximize Restore

  Switch to side-by-side view

--- a/PDL/Book/FirstSteps.pod
+++ b/PDL/Book/FirstSteps.pod
@@ -87,7 +87,7 @@
 would be required to generate the same display, even given the existence of
 some convenient graphics library.
 
-=for html <img WIDTH=400 src="firststeps/whirl-sync.png">
+=for html <img WIDTH=400 src="firststeps/sepia/crop/whirl-sync.png">
 
   Figure of a two dimensional C<sin>  function.
 
@@ -174,7 +174,7 @@
 
   pdl> imag $a;
 
-=for html <img WIDTH=600 src="firststeps/whirl-m51.png">
+=for html <img WIDTH=600 src="firststeps/sepia/crop/whirl-m51-default.png">
 
   Figure of the raw image C<m51_raw.fits> shown with
   progressively greater contrast using the C<imag> command.
@@ -186,8 +186,15 @@
 easily change that by specifying the black/white data values (Note: C<#> starts
 a Perl comment and can be ignored - i.e. no need to type the stuff after it!):
 
+=for html <img WIDTH=600 src="firststeps/sepia/crop/whirl-m51-1000.png">
+
   pdl> imag $a,0,1000; # More contrast
+
+
+=for html <img WIDTH=600 src="firststeps/sepia/crop/whirl-m51-300.png">
+
   pdl> imag $a,0,300;  # Even more contrast
+
 
 You can see that C<imag> takes additional arguments to specify the display
 range. In fact C<imag> takes quite a few arguments, many of them optional. By
@@ -208,9 +215,9 @@
 the actual image reflects the detector sensitivity. To correct our M51
 image, we merely have to divide the image by the flatfield:
 
-=for html <img WIDTH=400 src="firststeps/whirl-flat.png">
-
-  Figure: The 'flatfield' image showing the detector sensitivity of the raw data.
+=for html <img WIDTH=400 src="firststeps/sepia/crop/whirl-flat.png">
+
+Figure: The 'flatfield' image showing the detector sensitivity of the raw data.
 
 
   pdl> $gal = $a / $flat;
@@ -229,9 +236,9 @@
 (and use ten times more memory). In fact we can
 do whatever arithmetic operations we like on image piddles:
 
-=for html <img WIDTH=400 src="firststeps/whirl-flattened.png">
-
-  Figure: The M51 image corrected for the flatfield.
+=for html <img WIDTH=400 src="firststeps/sepia/crop/whirl-flattened.png">
+
+Figure: The M51 image corrected for the flatfield.
 
 
   pdl> $funny = log(($gal/300)**2 - $gal/100  + 4); 
@@ -291,15 +298,17 @@
   pdl> imag $mask;
   ...
 
-=for html <img WIDTH=400 src="firststeps/whirl-mask.png">
-
- Figure: Using  C<rvals> to generate a mask image
- to isolate the galaxy bulge and disk.
- 
- Top row: radial gradient image C<$r>, and radial gradient
- masked with less than operator C<$r < 50>.
- 
- Bottom row: Bulge and disk of the galaxy.
+=for html <img WIDTH=400 src="firststeps/sepia/crop/whirl-maska.png">
+
+=for html <img WIDTH=400 src="firststeps/sepia/crop/whirl-maskb.png">
+
+=for html <img WIDTH=400 src="firststeps/sepia/crop/whirl-maskc.png">
+
+=for html <img WIDTH=400 src="firststeps/sepia/crop/whirl-maskd.png">
+
+Figure: Using  C<rvals> to generate a mask image to isolate the galaxy bulge and disk.
+Top row: radial gradient image C<$r>, and radial gradient masked with less than operator C<$r < 50>.
+Bottom row: Bulge and disk of the galaxy.
 
 The Perl I<less than operator> is applied to all pixels in the image.
 You can see the result is an image which is 0 on the outskirts and 1 in
@@ -388,9 +397,9 @@
 fat the profile is across when it drops by half. Looking at the plot
 it looks like this is about 2-3 pixels - pretty compact!
 
-=for html <img WIDTH=400 src="firststeps/whirl-starradial.png">
-
-  Figure: Radial light profile of the bright star with fitted curve.
+=for html <img WIDTH=400 src="firststeps/sepia/crop/whirl-star-radial.png">
+
+Figure: Radial light profile of the bright star with fitted curve.
 
 Well we don't just want a guess - let's fit the profile with a function.
 These blurring functions are usually represented by the C<Gaussian>
@@ -481,9 +490,11 @@
 which does OpenGL graphics we can look at our simulated
 star in 3D (see the right hand panel);
 
-=for html <img WIDTH=600 src="firststeps/whirl-starsim.png">
-
-  Figure: Two different views of the 2D simulated Point Spread Function.
+=for html <img WIDTH=300 src="firststeps/sepia/crop/whirl-starsima.png">
+
+=for html <img WIDTH=300 src="firststeps/grey/work/whirl-starsimb.png">
+
+Figure: Two different views of the 2D simulated Point Spread Function.
 
    pdl> use PDL::Graphics::TriD; # Load the 3D graphics module
    pdl> imag3d [$fit2d];
@@ -552,9 +563,9 @@
 arrays of data, not single numbers. The result is shown, for amusement,
 in the figure below and takes virtually no time to compute.
 
-=for html <img WIDTH=400 src="firststeps/whirl-fakestars.png">
-
-  Figure: M51 covered in fake stars.
+=for html <img WIDTH=400 src="firststeps/sepia/crop/whirl-fakestars.png">
+
+Figure: M51 covered in fake stars.
 
 =head2 Getting Complex with M51
 
@@ -594,7 +605,7 @@
   pdl> $filter = kernctr $tmp, $tmp; # Shift origin to 0,0
   pdl> imag $filter;
 
-=for html <img WIDTH=400 src="firststeps/gal-filter.png">
+=for html <img WIDTH=400 src="firststeps/sepia/crop/gal-filter.png">
 
 You can see from the image that C<$filter> is zero everywhere except near the origin
 (0,0) (and the 3 reflected corners). As a result it only lets through
@@ -605,10 +616,11 @@
   pdl> ifftnd $gal2, $imag2;
   pdl> imag $gal2,0,300;
 
-=for html <img WIDTH=400 src="firststeps/whirl-fft.png">
-
-  Figure: Fourier filtered smoothed image and contrast enhanced
-  image with the smoothed image subtracted.
+=for html <img WIDTH=400 src="firststeps/sepia/crop/whirl-ffta.png">
+
+=for html <img WIDTH=400 src="firststeps/sepia/crop/whirl-fftb.png">
+
+Figure: Fourier filtered smoothed image and contrast enhanced image with the smoothed image subtracted.
 
 Well that looks quite a bit different!  Just about all the
 high-frequency information has vanished. To see the high-frequency