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<?xml version='1.0' encoding='utf-8' ?>
<!DOCTYPE chapter PUBLIC "-//OASIS//DTD DocBook XML V4.5//EN" "http://www.oasis-open.org/docbook/xml/4.5/docbookx.dtd" [
<!ENTITY % BOOK_ENTITIES SYSTEM "oodialog.ent">
%BOOK_ENTITIES;
]>
<!--#########################################################################
#
# Description: Open Object Rexx: ooDialog Reference XML file.
#
# Copyright (c) 2005-2013 Rexx Language Association. All rights reserved.
# Portions Copyright (c) 2004, IBM Corporation. All rights reserved.
#
# This program and the accompanying materials are made available under
# the terms of the Common Public License v1.0 which accompanies this
# distribution. A copy is also available at the following address:
# http://www.oorexx.org/license.html
#
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# without modification, are permitted provided that the following
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# Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright
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# notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in
# the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
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# of its contributors may be used to endorse or promote products
# derived from this software without specific prior written permission.
#
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# "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT
# LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS
# FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE COPYRIGHT
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# TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA,
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# OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING
# NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS
# SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.
#
#########################################################################
-->
<chapter id="chapOverview"><title>Brief Overview</title>
<indexterm><primary>overview</primary></indexterm>
<para>
ooDialog is a <emphasis role="italic">framework</emphasis> that aids ooRexx programmers in adding graphical elements
to their Rexx programs. The framework provides the base infrastructure, through a number of classes, that the
programmer builds on to quickly produce Windows dialogs. This book is a reference to the ooDialog classes, methods,
and utilities that make up the base infrastructure.
</para>
<para>
In general, the ooDialog framework simply provides the Rexx programmer with an interface to the Windows API, and
primarily to the part of the API that deals with dialogs and dialog controls. In almost all cases, the behavior of the
dialog and its controls is dictated by the Windows API. ooDialog has very little control of this. While this document
strives to be complete enough that a Rexx programmer, knowing very little of the Windows API, can effectively write
graphical programs in Rexx, it can never be as comprehensive as the actual Microsoft documentation. Therefore, the
Rexx programmer that needs, or desires, to go beyond the basic dialog and dialog behavior, will benefit greatly by
consulting the MSDN <xref linkend="defWindowsDoc"/>.
</para>
<section id="sctGettingStarted"><title>Getting Started</title>
<para>
The ooDialog documentation should be divided into two parts - a tutorial and a reference. In the original
documentation accompanying IBM's Object Rexx, the documentation <emphasis role="bold">was</emphasis> in two parts.
Unfortunately, the tutorial portion mostly described how to use the
IBM Resource <link linkend="ovvResourceWorkshop">Workshop</link>. Because the tutorial section was primarily directed towards using the Resource Workshop, it does not
make much sense in the current context.
</para>
<para>
This book is primarily a reference that describes the classes and methods in detail. There is no tutorial contained
within the book. In ooDialog 4.2.0, a new document, the ooDialog User Guide has been started. It does contain a
tutorial section, but at this point it is still a work in progress. The User Guide is a good starting point for the
newcomer and will help to get started using ooDialog. In addition to the ooDialog User Guide, the sample ooDialog
programs that accompany the ooRexx distribution are probably the best additional source of help for learning how to
use ooDialog. However, there are also numerous snippets of example code in this book. In addition the
getting <link linkend="helpGettingHelp">help</link> section of this reference lists a number of resources for the
programmer with questions about ooDialog.
</para>
</section>
<section id="sctTermDefs"><title>Definition of Terms</title>
<para>
A collection of definitions and explanations for terms used in the ooDialog documentation. These terms may not be
familiar to the average Rexx programmer.
</para>
<section id="defClientArea" xreflabel="client area"><title>Client / Nonclient Area</title>
<para>
The <emphasis role="italic">client area</emphasis> of a window is the part of a window where, normally, the window
does its active drawing. For a top-level window this is usually where an application displays its output. The title
bar, menu bar, window menu, minimize and maximize buttons, sizing border, and scroll bars are referred to
collectively as the window's <emphasis role="italic">nonclient</emphasis> area. The operating system manages most
aspects of the nonclient area. The application manages the appearance and behavior of its client area.
</para>
<para>
Dialogs are top-level windows, and the client area is the area where the dialog draws its controls. The nonclient
area is the border, title bar, etc.. For dialog controls, the client area is where the control draws itself. The
nonclient area would be the border of the control, if it has one.
</para>
</section>
<section id="defColor" xreflabel="color number"><title>Color</title>
<para>
Windows supports a method of specifying colors by using an index into a <emphasis role="italic">color palette</emphasis>,
see below. Palette color indexes are limited in number. The typical palette color indexes are 0 (black), 1 (dark red), 2
(dark green), 3 (dark yellow), 4 (dark blue), 5 (purple), 6 (blue grey), 7 (light grey), 8 (pale green), 9 (light blue), 10
(white), 11 (grey), 12 (dark grey), 13 (red), 14 (light green), 15 (yellow), 16 (blue), 17 (pink), 18 (turquoise).
</para>
</section>
<section id="defColorPalette" xreflabel="color pallette"><title>Color Palette</title>
<para>
An array that contains color values identifying the colors that can currently be displayed or drawn on the output
device.
</para>
<para>
Color palettes are used by devices that can generate many colors but can only display or draw a subset of them at a
time. For such devices, Windows maintains a system palette to track and manage the current colors of the device.
</para>
<para>
Applications do not have direct access to this system palette. Instead, Windows associates a default palette with each
device context. Applications can use the colors in the default palette.
</para>
<para>
The default palette is an array of color values identifying the colors that can be used with a device context by
default. Windows associates the default palette with a context whenever an application creates a context for a device
that supports color palettes. The default palette ensures that colors are available for use by an application without
any further action. The default palette typically has 20 entries (colors), but the exact number of entries can vary
from device to device. The colors in the default palette depend on the device. Display devices, for example, often
use the 16 standard colors of the VGA display and 4 other colors defined by Windows.
</para>
</section>
<section id="defColorRef" xreflabel="COLORREF"><title>COLORREF</title>
<para>
Windows uses a type named COLORREF to specify colors as RGB values. The RGB color model specifies a color by using a
number, 0 to 255, to represent each of the three primary colors, red, green, and blue. A COLORREF is a single number that
Windows will interpret as the 3 values for red, green, and blue. Many of the Windows APIs use a COLORREF as an argument
when working with colors.
</para>
<para>
ooDialog provides a number of methods to make it easy for the programmer to create a COLORREF number by specifying the 3
red, green, and blue values separately. Among these methods are the <xref linkend="mthColorRef"/> class method of the <xref
linkend="clsImage"/> class and the <xref linkend="mthRGB"/> method of the <xref linkend="clsCustomDraw"/> class.
</para>
</section>
<section id="defConventionalHex" xreflabel="hexidecimal"><title>Conventional Hexadecimal Format</title>
<para>
There are a number of methods in the ooDialog framework that have an argument that can be in numeric format, a whole
number, or in a <emphasis role="italic">conventional hexadecimal</emphasis> format. For the purposes of this
documentation this hexadecimal format is defined to be a Rexx string that begins with &quot;0x&quot; followed by a
maximum of 16 characters, which are only characters that represent hexadecimal numbers. I.e., &quot;0&quot; through
&quot;F&quot;. The following is meant to clarify this:
</para>
<programlisting>
<![CDATA[
-- Acceptable:
"0xffff"
"0XFFFF"
"0x000012aB"
"0xFFFF0000aaaa9999"
"0x0"
-- Incorrect:
" 0xffff" -- leading space
"0XFZFF" -- Z is not a hexadecimal symbol
"000012ab" -- second character must be x
"0x0123456789ABCDEF1" -- 17 characters
"00x0" -- second character must be x, not 0
]]>
</programlisting>
</section>
<section id="defPoundDefine" xreflabel="definitions"><title>#define Statement</title>
<para>
Define statements are often used in the C and C++ languages to define symbolic names for numerical values. Because of
this, it is common in Windows programs with dialogs to define symbolic names for resource IDs. Most Windows resource
editors use symbolic IDs, (some to a limited degree, others exclusively.) Often the define statements are put in a
header file so they are available both to the resource compiler and to the program code. The defines take the form
of: <computeroutput>#define symbolicName numericValue </computeroutput> as in this example:
</para>
<programlisting>
<![CDATA[
#define ID_PUSHBUTTON1 413
#define ID_EDIT1 511
#define ID_LISTBOX1 602
]]>
</programlisting>
</section>
<section id="defDeviceContext" xreflabel="device context"><title>Device Context</title>
<para>
A device context is associated with all windows that appear on the screen, such as a dialog or a dialog control. It
is a drawing area managed by a window. A device context stores information about the graphic objects that are
displayed, such as bitmaps, lines, and pixels, and the tools used to display them, such as pens, brushes, and fonts. A
device context can be acquired for a dialog or a dialog control. It must be explicitly freed when the text or graphic
operations are completed.
</para>
</section>
<section id="defDialogIcon" xreflabel="dialog icon"><title>Dialog Icon</title>
<para>
The term <emphasis role="italic">dialog icon</emphasis> is used in this documentation to refer to the icon that is
displayed in the left hand corner of the title bar of a dialog. In Windows this is often called the <emphasis
role="italic">application</emphasis> icon. The dialog icon is also used for the Task Bar display and in the AltTab
task switcher application.
</para>
<para>
The dialog icon for a specific dialog can be set when the dialog is run using one of the execute methods. See the
<xref linkend="mthExecute"/> or <xref linkend="mthPopup"/> methods for example. ooDialog provides
four icon images for use in dialogs. Other, custom, icons can be used by including the icon in a binary (compiled)
resource, a resource script, or by using the <xref linkend="mthAddIconResource"/> method of the
UserDialog. The following table shows the pre-defined symbolic IDs of the icon images provided by ooDialog. The
symbolic ID should always be used in case the numeric value is changed in the future. In addition, the programmer
should avoid using any of the <link linkend="ovvPreDefinedSymbolicIDs">pre-defined</link> symbolic IDs reserved by
ooDialog. The IDI_DLG_DEFAULT is a fifth symbolic ID that represents the default dialog icon. This ID can always be
used where a dialog icon ID is needed.
</para>
<table frame="all">
<title>ooDialog Supplied Icons</title>
<tgroup cols="2">
<thead>
<row>
<entry>Description</entry>
<entry>Symbolic ID</entry>
</row>
</thead>
<tbody>
<row>
<entry>The default, the letters OOD</entry>
<entry>IDI_DLG_OODIALOG</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>Dialog box image</entry>
<entry>IDI_DLG_APPICON</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>Fancier dialog box image</entry>
<entry>IDI_DLG_APPICON2</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>The ooRexx image</entry>
<entry>IDI_DLG_OOREXX</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>IDI_DLG_DEFAULT</entry>
<entry>IDI_DLG_DEFAULT</entry>
</row>
</tbody>
</tgroup>
</table>
</section>
<section id="defDialogUnit" xreflabel="dialog unit"><title>Dialog Unit</title>
<para>
Dialog box templates contain measurements that define the size and position of the dialog box and its controls. These
measurements are device independent. This allows a single template to be used to create the same dialog box for all
types of display devices. Using device independent measurements allows a dialog box to have the same proportions and
appearance on all screens despite differing resolutions and aspect ratios between screens.
</para>
<para>
These measurements are called dialog template units, often shortened to just dialog units in this documentation.
</para>
<para>
The following paragraph in italics, which has been the sole documentation of dialog units in the ooDialog
documentation prior to version 4.0.0, is unfortunately incorrect. The value of a dialog unit is dependent on the font
actually used in the dialog, not on the system font. The statements below were probably true in very early versions of
Windows when every dialog used system 8 pt font. Today it is highly unusual for a dialog to use system 8 pt font. The
factorX and factorY values are calculated incorrectly. These values are only correct if the dialog is using system 8
pt font and are incorrect for a dialog using any other font.
</para>
<para>
<emphasis role="italic">There is a horizontal and a vertical dialog base unit to convert width and height of dialog
boxes and controls from dialog units to pixels and vice versa. The value of these base units depend on the screen
resolution and the active system font; they are stored in attributes of the UserDialog class.</emphasis>
<programlisting>
<![CDATA[
xPixels = xDialogUnits * self~FactorX
]]>
</programlisting>
<emphasis role="bold">Note</emphasis> that in the above line of code <computeroutput>xPixels</computeroutput> will be
<xref linkend="ovvInaccurate"/>.
</para>
</section>
<section id="defHandle" xreflabel="handle"><title>Handle</title>
<para>
A unique reference to a Windows object assigned by the system. It can be a reference to a dialog, a particular dialog
control, a window, or a graphic object (pen, brush, font). Handles are required for certain methods. A handle is an
opaque type, the Rexx programmer need not be aware of the specific format of a handle. The ooDialog framework provides
methods that return handles and methods for retrieving handles from the operating system. When a method requires a
handle as an argument, the Rexx programmer needs to obtain the handle from one of those provided methods.
</para>
</section>
<section id="defHeaderFile" xreflabel="file"><title>Header File</title>
<para>
A common practice when programming applications in Windows that use dialogs and dialog resources is to place symbolic
defines in a separate file. These files often have a .h extension and are usually called header files. Windows
resource editors often manage a header file for the symbolic IDs automatically. (For instance Microsoft's dialog
editor creates, writes, and reads the resource ID header file completely on its own. The user does not need to take
any action other than including the file in her program.)
</para>
</section>
<section id="defModalModeless" xreflabel="modal"><title>Modal and Modeless Dialogs</title>
<para>
<indexterm><primary>Modal dialog</primary></indexterm>
<indexterm><primary>Modeless dialog</primary></indexterm>
Dialogs are executed in two basic ways. A <emphasis role="italic">modal</emphasis> dialog blocks keyboard and mouse
input to all other windows started by the program. The user can not switch to another window in the program without
closing the modal dialog. In ooDialog this is often all other dialogs started by the program. A <emphasis
role="italic">modeless</emphasis> dialog operates independently of the other dialogs in the program. The user can
switch away from a modeless dialog and work with any of the other dialogs in the program.
</para>
<para>
Be aware that the original developers of ooDialog choose to not implement true modal dialogs. Rather, they implemented
a strategy where all dialogs are created as modeless dialog and the ooDialog framework keeps track of the last dialog
executed. This <emphasis role="italic">last executed</emphasis> dialog is then manually disabled to mimic the
behaviour of true modal dialogs. While this strategy is usually sufficient, it will sometimes cause the wrong dialog
to be disabled.
</para>
<para>
In the ooDialog framework use the <xref linkend="mthExecute"/> method to create modal dialogs and the
<xref linkend="mthPopup"/> or <xref linkend="mthPopupAsChild"/> methods to create
modeless dialogs.
</para>
</section>
<section id="defPixel" xreflabel="pixel"><title>Pixel</title>
<para>
Individual addressable point on the monitor (screen or display.) Pixels are whole numbers. Ancient VGA screens
supported 640 by 480 pixels, SVGA screens supported higher resolutions, such as 800 by 600, 1024 by 768, and up.
Modern displays support much higher resolutions. 1600 by 1200 is common and displays with 2560x1600 are available.
Pixel values start at the top left corner of the main display, with that corner being (0,0). Prior to dual monitor
capabilities, pixel values were always non-negative. On a dual monitor system that is no longer true, depending on the
virtual position of the secondary monitor. If it is to the left or above the primary monitor negative pixel values are
possible.
</para>
</section>
<section id="defResourceEditor" xreflabel="resource editor"><title>Resource Editor</title>
<para>
Resource editors are visual tools used to create a dialog <xref linkend="ovvDialogTemplate"/> in a text
file. Visual resource editors provide a WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) environment to design dialogs. The
editor manages the size and positioning of a dialog and its controls. The user can drag and drop controls where they
are wanted and use the mouse to size the dialog and controls. Resource editors simplify the process of designing the
look of a dialog and reduce the amount of trial and error design inherent in using the
<xref linkend="clsUserDialog"/> class.
</para>
</section>
<section id="defResourceId" xreflabel="resource ID"><title>Resource ID</title>
<para>
A resource ID is the identification number of a dialog resource. There are several different types of dialog
resources, menus, dialog controls, and bitmaps, to name a few. You assign IDs when you create the resource definition
for your dialog. An ID can be either numerical (for example, 1) or symbolic (for example, "IDOK").
</para>
<para>
IDs must be unique for each resource of the same type. Although two resources of different types may have the same
ID, when using <link linkend="ovvSymbolicIDMechanism">symbolic</link> IDs within the ooDialog framework it is
advisable to give all resources unique numerical IDs.
</para>
</section>
<section id="defResourceScript" xreflabel="script"><title>Resource Script</title>
<para>
Resource script files are plain text files usually produced by a resource editor. The files generally have a file
extension of &quot;.rc&quot;, but an extension of &quot;.dlg&quot; is used by some resource editors. The text of a
resource script defines a dialog <xref linkend="ovvDialogTemplate"/>. The format of the text is defined
by Microsoft and public knowledge. The format is easily parsable by computer software and is used by resource
compilers to produce a compiled (binary) file containing the dialog template(s) defined in the script file. The
ooDialog framework can parse a resource script file and dynamically produce a dialog template in memory. This is the
basis of how a <xref linkend="clsRcDialog"/> works.
</para>
</section>
<section id="defScreenCoordinates" xreflabel="coordinates"><title>Screen / Client Coordinates</title>
<para>
Points on the screen are described as x and y coordinate pairs (x,y). The x coordinates increase to the right, y
coordinates increase towards the bottom. <emphasis role="italic">Screen</emphasis> and <emphasis
role="italic">client</emphasis> coordinates are used to distinguish the origin (0,0) of the coordinate. For a screen
coordinate, the origin is the upper left corner of the primary display device, typically a monitor, and usually called
the screen. Client coordinates on the other hand have an origin of the upper left corner of the
<xref linkend="defClientArea"/> of the window. Both screen and client coordinates are always given in the
device unit of the display, which for all practical purposes is a<xref linkend="defPixel"/>.
</para>
</section>
<section id="defSymbolicId" xreflabel="symbolic"><title>Symbolic ID</title>
<para>
A symbolic name is a constant symbol that uniquely identifies a specific entity in a program. Defining a symbolic name
for each numeric resource ID is often done in programs that work with resource IDs. The symbolic name is then used
where ever a numeric resource ID is needed. Symbolic names are easier to remember than numeric IDs and can make the
code easier to understand.
</para>
<para>
Symbolic names are most often used in compiled programs, where a preprocessor replaces each occurrence of the symbolic
name in the code with its numeric value before the code is compiled. Symbolic names are less often used in interpreted
languages because there is no preprocessor step where substitutions can be made. However, ooDialog provides a robust
and useful <xref linkend="ovvSymbolicIDMechanism"/> for using symbolic IDs in ooDialog programs.
Programmers wishing to use symbolic resource IDs in their programs should be familiar with this
<xref linkend="ovvSymbolicIDMechanism"/>.
</para>
</section>
<section id="defSysColor" xreflabel="system color"><title>SystemColor</title>
<para>
The Windows operating system maintains a table of system colors for each display element. Display elements are the
parts of a window and the display that appear on the system display screen. The user can customize the color of each
display element, so each element is assigned a unique numeric and symbolic ID. Referring to one of the system colors
by its ID allows the programmer to use the correct color of a display element without having to know if the user has
customized the color for that element or not.
</para>
<para>
The following table lists the numeric and symbolic keyword for each display element. In the ooDialog framework, for
methods that work with the system colors, like <xref linkend="mthSetSysColor"/> or
<xref linkend="mthSetControlSysColor"/>, the system color can be specified using either its numeric
ID or its keyword. Note that the operating system symbol for each keyword actually is prefaced by COLOR_. I.e., the
actual symbol for 3DDKSHADOW is COLOR_3DDKSHADOW, for 3DFACE the symbol is COLOR_3DFACE, etc.. This table lists the
ooDialog keyword.
</para>
<table id="tblSysColors" frame="all">
<title>System Color Elements</title>
<tgroup cols="3">
<colspec colwidth="1*" />
<colspec colwidth="6*" />
<colspec colwidth="6*" />
<thead>
<row>
<entry>ID</entry>
<entry>Symbol</entry>
<entry>Element</entry>
</row>
</thead>
<tbody>
<row>
<entry>21</entry>
<entry>3DDKSHADOW</entry>
<entry>Dark shadow for three-dimensional display elements.</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>15</entry>
<entry>3DFACE</entry>
<entry>Face color for three-dimensional display elements and for dialog box backgrounds.</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>20</entry>
<entry>3DHIGHLIGHT</entry>
<entry>Highlight color for three-dimensional display elements (for edges facing the light source.)</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>20</entry>
<entry>3DHILIGHT</entry>
<entry>Highlight color for three-dimensional display elements (for edges facing the light source.)</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>22</entry>
<entry>3DLIGHT</entry>
<entry>Light color for three-dimensional display elements (for edges facing the light source.)</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>16</entry>
<entry>3DSHADOW</entry>
<entry>Shadow color for three-dimensional display elements (for edges facing away from the light source).</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>10</entry>
<entry>ACTIVEBORDER</entry>
<entry>Active window border.</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry> 2</entry>
<entry>ACTIVECAPTION</entry>
<entry>Active window title bar. Specifies the left side color in the color gradient of an active window's title bar if the gradient effect is enabled.</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>12</entry>
<entry>APPWORKSPACE</entry>
<entry>Background color of multiple document interface (MDI) applications.</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry> 1</entry>
<entry>BACKGROUND</entry>
<entry>Desktop.</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>15</entry>
<entry>BTNFACE</entry>
<entry>Face color for three-dimensional display elements and for dialog box backgrounds.</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>20</entry>
<entry>BTNHIGHLIGHT</entry>
<entry>Highlight color for three-dimensional display elements (for edges facing the light source.)</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>20</entry>
<entry>BTNHILIGHT</entry>
<entry>Highlight color for three-dimensional display elements (for edges facing the light source.)</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>16</entry>
<entry>BTNSHADOW</entry>
<entry>Shadow color for three-dimensional display elements (for edges facing away from the light source).</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>18</entry>
<entry>BTNTEXT</entry>
<entry>Text on push buttons.</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry> 9</entry>
<entry>CAPTIONTEXT</entry>
<entry>Text in caption, size box, and scroll bar arrow box.</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry> 1</entry>
<entry>DESKTOP</entry>
<entry>Desktop.</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>27</entry>
<entry>GRADIENTACTIVECAPTION</entry>
<entry>Right side color in the color gradient of an active window's title bar if the gradient effect is enabled. ACTIVECAPTION specifies the left side color.</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>28</entry>
<entry>GRADIENTINACTIVECAPTION</entry>
<entry>Right side color in the color gradient of an inactive window's title bar. INACTIVECAPTION specifies the left side color.</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>17</entry>
<entry>GRAYTEXT</entry>
<entry>Grayed (disabled) text. This color is set to 0 if the current display driver does not support a solid gray color.</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>13</entry>
<entry>HIGHLIGHT</entry>
<entry>Item(s) selected in a control.</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>14</entry>
<entry>HIGHLIGHTTEXT</entry>
<entry>Text of item(s) selected in a control.</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>26</entry>
<entry>HOTLIGHT</entry>
<entry>Color for a hyperlink or hot-tracked item.</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>11</entry>
<entry>INACTIVEBORDER</entry>
<entry>Inactive window border.</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry> 3</entry>
<entry>INACTIVECAPTION</entry>
<entry>Inactive window caption. Specifies the left side color in the color gradient of an inactive window's title bar if the gradient effect is enabled.</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>19</entry>
<entry>INACTIVECAPTIONTEXT</entry>
<entry>Color of text in an inactive caption.</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>24</entry>
<entry>INFOBK</entry>
<entry>Background color for tooltip controls.</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>23</entry>
<entry>INFOTEXT</entry>
<entry>Text color for tooltip controls.</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry> 4</entry>
<entry>MENU</entry>
<entry>Menu background.</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>29</entry>
<entry>MENUHILIGHT</entry>
<entry>The color used to highlight menu items when the menu appears as a flat menu. The highlighted menu item is outlined with HIGHLIGHT.</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>30</entry>
<entry>MENUBAR</entry>
<entry>The background color for the menu bar when menus appear as flat menus. However, MENU continues to specify the background color of the menu popup.</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry> 7</entry>
<entry>MENUTEXT</entry>
<entry>Text in menus.</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry> 0</entry>
<entry>SCROLLBAR</entry>
<entry>Scroll bar gray area.</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry> 5</entry>
<entry>WINDOW</entry>
<entry>Window background.</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry> 6</entry>
<entry>WINDOWFRAME</entry>
<entry>Window frame.</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry> 8</entry>
<entry>WINDOWTEXT</entry>
<entry>Text in windows.</entry>
</row>
</tbody></tgroup>
</table>
</section>
<section id="defSystemErrorCode" xreflabel="system error code"><title>System Error Code</title>
<para>
The term <emphasis role="italic">system error code</emphasis> refers to an error code set by the Windows operating
system when an API fails. ooDialog provides an interface to the Windows APIs and when an error is detected many of
the ooDialog methods have some means of conveying the system error code to the programmer. The ooDialog programmer can
look up the meaning of a system error code in the MSDN <xref linkend="defWindowsDoc"/> to understand
better the cause of a failure.
</para>
<para>
ooDialog provides the <xref linkend="dotSystemErrorCode"/> environment entry as a means for the
Rexx programmer to determine the value of the system error code after a method has executed. Note that not all of the
Windows APIs set the system error code. And, likewise, not all of the ooDialog methods set the
<computeroutput>.systemErrorCode</computeroutput>.
</para>
</section>
<section id="defWindowsDoc" xreflabel="documentation"><title>Windows Documentation</title>
<para>
The term <emphasis role="italic">Windows documentation</emphasis> is used throughout the ooDialog reference to refer
to the Windows Operating System documentation provided by Microsoft. The documentation is called the <emphasis
role="bold">MSDN Library</emphasis>. The library is provided online for anyone to access. In addition, since May
2006, Microsoft has also provided free of charge the ISO images of the library installation program. Anyone can
download the ISOs, burn them to a CD and install the library locally on their system.
</para>
<para>
It is not necessary for the ooDialog programmer to know or understand the underlying Windows API that ooDialog is
built on. However, as programmers write more sophisticated ooDialog applications, it may prove helpful to look up
certain details in the MSDN Library. The information below is provided to help the ooDialog programmer locate the
MSDN Library, if they would like to. All things on the Internet change. The URLs listed here are accurate at the time
of this writing.
</para>
<para>
The online MSDN Library is currently located at:
</para>
<para>
http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/default.aspx.
</para>
<para>
Directions to the downloadable ISO images of the MSDN Library have been posted on this blog entry:
</para>
<para>
http://blogs.msdn.com/robcaron/archive/2006/07/26/678897.aspx
</para>
<para>
A Google search using: <computeroutput>"Rob Caron" General Downloads MSDN Library</computeroutput> should also turn up
the blog entry.
</para>
</section>
<section id="defPlatformSDK" xreflabel="SDK"><title>Windows Platform SDK</title>
<para>
The <emphasis role="italic">Windows Platform SDK</emphasis> is provided free of charge by Microsoft. The SDK is not
needed to write ooDialog programs. However, combining the use of the documentation in the MSDN Library with the SDK
allows very sophisticated ooDialog programs to be written. In general, the ooDialog framework takes care of the
low-level details needed to work with the Windows API. However, there are a few generic ooDialog methods
that provide direct access to the Windows API.
</para>
<para>
As an example, the <xref linkend="mthAddUserMsg"/> method allows the programmer to connect any
Windows message sent to a dialog to a method in his ooDialog class. To use this method, the programmer would go to
the MSDN library to look up details on the message and message parameters he is interested in. He would then use the
Platform SDK to determine the numeric value of the Windows message and possibly the numeric values of its parameters.
</para>
<para>
This link provides some good information on the Platform SDK in general and also points the reader to where to get a
SDK.
</para>
<para>
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Platform_SDK
</para>
<para>
Again, note that it is not at all necessary to obtain, or understand details concerning, the Platform SDK. This
information is provided for those programmers that have reached the point where they think a method like
<computeroutput>addUserMessage</computeroutput> might help them and need some direction as to how to go about using
it.
</para>
</section>
</section> <!-- End: Definition of Terms -->
<section id="sctGeneralOODialog"><title>Common Concepts</title>
<para>
Many concepts and behaviors in ooDialog, and statements about ooDialog are general in nature. This section gathers up
this information in one place. Rather than repeating this information in every method or class description to which
it applies, the author will assume that the reader understands that the information is always applicable unless
specifically stated otherwise.
</para>
<section id="ovvDeprecated" xreflabel="deprecated"><title>Deprecated</title>
<para>
PROVIDE TEXT
</para>
</section>
<section id="ovvDialogTemplate" xreflabel="template"><title>Dialog Template</title>
<para>
<indexterm><primary>Template, Dialog</primary></indexterm>
The <xref linkend="ovvUnderlying"/> dialog seen by the user is created by the operating system from a
dialog template in memory. The template describes the size and position of the dialog and all of its controls. The
template also contains modifiers that control the style, behavior, and attributes of the dialog and its controls. To
make designing dialogs easier, Windows supports the concept of a textual representation of the dialog template. The
textual representation can then be translated by software tools to the binary form of the template needed by the
operating system.
</para>
<para>
ooDialog uses three basic constructs that allow the Rexx programmer to supply the dialog template. The programmer can
use a binary resource, a resource script, or create the template dynamically in the program code. A binary (compiled)
dialog template is stored in a DLL, (usually a .dll file.) The programmer subclasses a
<xref linkend="clsResDialog"/> to use a binary resource. Resource scripts, (usually a .rc file) supply the
dialog template in a text file. The programmer subclasses a <xref linkend="clsRcDialog"/> to create a
dialog from a resource script. To create a dialog template dynamically in the program code, the programmer subclasses
a <xref linkend="clsUserDialog"/> and then uses the <xref linkend="sctCreateMethods"/> methods of that class to create the
dialog template. The <computeroutput>UserDialog</computeroutput> object translates the program statements into the
in-memory dialog template required by the operating system. The
<computeroutput>RcDialog</computeroutput> object parses the resource script and converts the resource script
statements into an in-memory dialog template by invoking the proper methods of its superclass, the
<computeroutput>UserDialog</computeroutput>.
</para>
</section>
<section id="ovvEvents" xreflabel="event"><title>Events</title>
<para>
The ooDialog framework facilitates the use of a type of programming often called <emphasis role="italic">event
driven programming</emphasis>. In event driven programming, the program usually does some initial set up and then
sits in some type of loop waiting to be signaled that an event just happened. The Windows graphical windowing
system is designed to be programmed this way. The Windows operating system uses <emphasis
role="italic">messages</emphasis> to notify each window in the system of events specific to that window. Typically
events are generated by the user. For instance, clicking a button, typing a key, moving the mouse, all generate
events. The operating system notifies the window with the input focus of those events by sending <xref
linkend="ovvWindowMessages"/>s to the window. Note that some events are generated by the operating system itself. For
instance, when the user moves a window that uncovers a portion of a window beneath it, the operating system will send a
message to the underlying window notifying it that it needs to redraw the uncovered portion.
</para>
<para>
Once the basic set up for an ooDialog program is done, the dialog object basically sits there waiting for an
<emphasis role="italic">event</emphasis> of interest to happen. When the event happens, the program responds by
taking some action. The programmer decides what events are of interest and uses methods provided by the ooDialog
framework to <emphasis role="italic">connect</emphasis> a method in the dialog object to the event notification. The
majority of the event connection methods are part of the <xref linkend="clsEventNotification"/>
class. The connected methods are often called <emphasis role="italic">event handlers</emphasis> because the code in
the method handles the event.
</para>
<variablelist>
<varlistentry id="ovvEventsDirectReply" xreflabel="directly"><term><emphasis role="bold">Directly Reply</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
Event notification messages in Windows fall into two groups, messages where the reply is ignored and messages where
the reply is significant. Prior to the introduction of the C++ <link linkend="sctHistory">native</link> APIs, there was
<emphasis role="bold">no way</emphasis> in ooDialog to <emphasis role="italic">directly</emphasis> reply to the
notification message. This placed a severe restriction on ooDialog programs. Many of the features of the operating
system could not be used with this restriction. For instance, when a user selects a new tab in a
<xref linkend="clsTab"/> control, the operating system sends a SELCHANGING event notification before the selected
tab is changed. The programmer can allow or prevent the change by replying true or false to the notification message.
</para>
<para>
Without the ability to reply directly to the notification, the ooDialog programmer could not take advantage of the
SELCHANGING notification. The introduction of the C++ native APIs in ooRexx 4.0.0 removed this restriction. Beginning
in ooDialog 4.2.0, the event handling methods in the Rexx dialog object can be directly invoked from the Windows
message processing loop. This allows the Rexx dialog object to reply directly to the notification message.
</para>
<para>
In addition, the underlying Windows message processing loop provides a form of synchronization in Windows
applications. Within the loop, a Windows application receives a message, processes it, then receives the next message,
processes it, and so on. In older ooDialog programs this syncronization was lost because ooDialog put the recieved
message on a queue, recieved the next message, put it on the queue, and continued. This meant that many messages could
be recieved in the processing loop before a single message was process by the ooDialog program. This loss of
synchronization caused ooDialog applications to perform poorly.
</para>
<para>
The ability to directly reply to event notifications greatly extends the power of the ooDialog framework. However, it
also changes how the ooDialog programmer must write his event handlers. In particular, the event handler must return
in a timely manner. This is discussed more <link linkend="sctCodingEventHandlers">fully</link> in the
<computeroutput>EventNotification</computeroutput> class documentation.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
</variablelist>
</section>
<section id="ovvInaccurate" xreflabel="inaccurate"><title>factorX / factorY</title>
<para>
The <emphasis role="italic">factorX</emphasis> and <emphasis role="italic">factorY</emphasis> attributes of the
<xref linkend="chpDialogObject"/> object were intended to provide a way to convert between <link
linkend="defPixel">pixels</link> and dialog <link linkend="defDialogUnit">units</link>, and vice versa. Although their
values may have been correct when ooDialog was originally <link linkend="sctHistory">designed</link>, in almost all cases
the values are now incorrect. The method used to calculate the ratio between dialog units and pixels is not correct.
</para>
<para>
Unfortunately, many of the methods in the ooDialog framework use <emphasis role="italic">factorX</emphasis> and
<emphasis role="italic">factorY</emphasis> to convert between pixels and dialog units. This in turn makes all of
those methods inaccurate. These methods are all marked as being inaccurate. There is almost always no reason to
convert back to dialog units from pixels. Once the underlying dialog has been created, pixels should be used. Each
inaccurate method in the framework has a corresponding method that uses pixels instead of dialog units.
</para>
</section>
<section id="ovvResourceWorkshop"><title>IBM Resource Workshop</title>
<para>
The IBM Resource Workshop was a visual <xref linkend="defResourceEditor"/> included with IBM Object Rexx. The Resource
Workshop could not be contributed to the open source community and is therefore not a part of the
Open Object Rexx project.
</para>
<para><emphasis role="bold">Note</emphasis>, there is <emphasis role="bold">no loss</emphasis> of functionality in
ooDialog because of the absence of the Resource Workshop. The Windows resource format is well understood and there
are any number of free or inexpensive resource editors that do a better job of designing dialogs than the Resource
Workshop did. (The Resource Workshop was a 16-bit application with limited capacity for the newer features in the
Windows user interface.) ooDialog works fine with dialogs designed by any modern resource editor.
</para>
</section>
<section id="ovvNumbers" xreflabel="numbers"><title>Numbers in ooDialog:</title>
<para>
Numbers in ooDialog are <emphasis role="bold">always</emphasis> whole numbers, unless specifically stated otherwise.
Except in very rare cases, the Windows API that ooDialog provides access to, only deals with whole numbers. Pixels,
positions, sizes of fonts, coordinates on the screen, etc., are all expressed as whole numbers only. Numerical
arguments to methods in ooDialog must always be whole numbers, unless the documentation specifically notes that the
method accepts fractional numbers for the argument.
</para>
</section>
<section id="ovvPreDefinedSymbolicIDs"><title>Predefined Symbolic IDs</title>
<para>
The symbolic IDs in the following table are pre-defined by ooDialog and always available to the programmer. They are
placed in the either the <xref linkend="atrConstDir"/> attribute when an instance of a dialog class is
created, or in the global <xref linkend="dotConstDir"/>. Where they are placed is dependent on the
<xref linkend="mthUseGlobalConstDir"/> of the <computeroutput>.constDir</computeroutput>. All symbolic
names after IDC_STATIC in the table refer to resources bound to oodialog.dll for general use by the ooDialog
programmer.
</para>
<para>
To allow for future expansion, the ooDialog programmer should consider the resource IDs of 1 through 50 as reserved
for ooDialog. Programmers can avoid conflicts by using IDs greater than 50 for resource IDs they assign in their
programs.
</para>
<table id="oodsymbolicids" frame="all">
<title>Symbolic IDs Predefined by ooDialog</title>
<tgroup cols="3">
<thead>
<row>
<entry>Symbolic ID</entry>
<entry>Numeric ID or Symbol</entry>
<entry>ResourceType</entry>
</row>
</thead>
<tbody>
<row>
<entry>IDOK</entry>
<entry>1</entry>
<entry>ID for button controls</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>IDCANCEL</entry>
<entry>2</entry>
<entry>ID for button controls</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>IDABORT</entry>
<entry>3</entry>
<entry>ID for button controls</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>IDRETRY</entry>
<entry>4</entry>
<entry>ID for button controls</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>IDIGNORE</entry>
<entry>5</entry>
<entry>ID for button controls</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>IDYES</entry>
<entry>6</entry>
<entry>ID for button controls</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>IDNO</entry>
<entry>7</entry>
<entry>ID for button controls</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>IDCLOSE</entry>
<entry>8</entry>
<entry>ID for button controls</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>IDHELP</entry>
<entry>9</entry>
<entry>ID for button controls</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>IDTRYAGAIN</entry>
<entry>10</entry>
<entry>ID for button controls</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>IDCONTINUE</entry>
<entry>11</entry>
<entry>ID for button controls</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>IDC_STATIC</entry>
<entry>-1</entry>
<entry>ID for static controls</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>IDI_DLG_OODIALOG</entry>
<entry>IDI_DLG_OODIALOG</entry>
<entry>Icon image</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>IDI_DLG_APPICON</entry>
<entry>IDI_DLG_APPICON</entry>
<entry>Icon image</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>IDI_DLG_APPICON2</entry>
<entry>IDI_DLG_APPICON2</entry>
<entry>Icon image</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>IDI_DLG_OOREXX</entry>
<entry>IDI_DLG_OOREXX</entry>
<entry>Icon image</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>IDI_DLG_DEFAULT</entry>
<entry>IDI_DLG_DEFAULT</entry>
<entry>Icon image</entry>
</row>
</tbody>
</tgroup>
</table>
<para id="paraGenericResources">
The symbolic IDs in the table following IDC_STATIC are the IDs of some generic
<xref linkend="chapResources"/> that are bound to the oodialog.dll file. They can be used in any ooDialog
program and are accessed using the <xref linkend="clsResourceImage"/> class. Programmers should
always use their symbolic ID rather than their numeric ID in case the numeric value changes in future versions of
ooDialog.
</para>
</section>
<section id="ovvComctl32" xreflabel="Library"><title>Required Common Control Library (Comctl32) Version</title>
<para>
The dialog control windows used in dialogs, List-Views, Edit, Tree-Views, etc., are supplied by Microsoft in the
common controls library. This is a DLL with the name comctl32.dll. Every version of Windows is supplied with a common
controls library. However, Microsoft has updated the library a number of times to provide enhanced functionality and
improved features
</para>
<para>
Each new version of the library is backwards compatible with previous versions, but, it will contain features not
available in older versions. For instance, some of the List-View extended <link
linkend="varListControlExtendedStyles">styles</link> are only available with a 6.0, or later, version of the common
controls library. ooDialog can only provide the features available in the version of the common controls library on the
system ooDialog is running on.
</para>
<para>
Therefore, an ooDialog program running on a Windows 2000 machine will not have available some of the features that are
available when ooDialog is running on a XP service pack two system. The DlgUtil class provides a method,
<xref linkend="mthComCtl32Version"/> that allows the programmer to determine the exact version of
the common controls library that ooDialog is using. In the documentation for the ooDialog dialog control classes,
features that are not available in all versions of the common control library are noted. The minimum version of the
library that is needed is listed. In general, at this time, all features of ooDialog are available on Windows XP
or later. This may change in the future as Vista has common control features not available on XP.
</para>
</section>
<section id="ovvRectangleCoordinates" xreflabel="rectangle"><title>Rectangle Coordinates</title>
<para>
The ooDialog framework, and Windows itself, often use a <xref linkend="clsRect"/> object to specify
coordinates of a window, or a portion of a window. However, there are two different ways the rectangle is used. For
purposes of this documentation, the two types of rectangle are defined as a <emphasis role="bold">bounding</emphasis>
rectangle and a <emphasis role="bold">point/size</emphasis> rectangle.
</para>
<variablelist>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Bounding Rectangle:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
In a <emphasis role="italic">bounding</emphasis> rectangle, the members of the <computeroutput>Rect</computeroutput>
object define the upper left point of the rectangle and the lower right point of the rectangle. That is, the
<emphasis role="italic">left</emphasis> and <emphasis role="italic">top</emphasis> attributes of the
<computeroutput>Rect</computeroutput> object are the (x,y) coordinates of the upper left corner of the rectangle and
the <emphasis role="italic">right</emphasis> and <emphasis role="italic">bottom</emphasis> attributes are the
(x1,y1) coordinates of the bottom right corner of the rectangle.
</para>
<para>
In this usage, the width of the rectangle is derived by subtracting the <emphasis role="italic">left</emphasis>
attribute from the <emphasis role="italic">right</emphasis> attribute and the height of the rectangle is derived by
subtracting the <emphasis role="italic">top</emphasis> attribute from the <emphasis role="italic">bottom</emphasis>
attribute.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Point / Size Rectangle:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
In a <emphasis role="italic">point / size</emphasis> rectangle, the members of the
<computeroutput>Rect</computeroutput> object define the upper left point of the rectangle and the size of the
rectangle. That is, the <emphasis role="italic">left</emphasis> and <emphasis role="italic">top</emphasis>
attributes of the <computeroutput>Rect</computeroutput> object are the (x,y) coordinates of the upper left corner of
the rectangle. The <emphasis role="italic">right</emphasis> attribute of the <computeroutput>Rect</computeroutput>
object is the width of the rectangle. The <emphasis role="italic">bottom</emphasis> attribute is the height of the
rectangle
</para>
<para>
In this usage, the x coordinate of lower right corner of the rectangle is derived by adding the <emphasis
role="italic">left</emphasis> and <emphasis role="italic">right</emphasis> attributes. The y coordinate of the lower
corner of the rectangle is derived by adding the <emphasis role="italic">top</emphasis> and <emphasis
role="italic">bottom</emphasis> attributes.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
</variablelist> </section>
<section id="ovvRequiredWindows" xreflabel="Requires"><title>Required Windows Version</title>
<para>
The required Windows version is similar to the required Common Control <xref linkend="ovvComctl32"/> library version.
Later versions of the Windows operating system have dialog and dialog control features not available in earlier
versions of the operating system.
</para>
<para>
For instance, the <xref linkend="clsMonthCalendar"/> class has a number of methods that are only
available on Vista or later. ooDialog can only use the features available on the system on which it is executing. If
a method is invoked that is not available on the current operating system, a syntax conditions is raised. Any
method not available on all the Windows versions which ooRexx supports, have the minimum required Windows version
noted in their documentation.
</para>
<para>
The <xref linkend="clsOS"/> class supplies methods that allow the programmer to determine exactly which
operating system version the program is currently executing on. For programs that need to run on all versions of
Windows, the programmer must either avoid using methods not available on all versions, or test for the current
version and provide an alternative code path dependent on that version. The <xref linkend="mthIsAtLeastVista"/>
method of the <emphasis role="italic">OS</emphasis> class provides an example of this.
</para>
</section>
<section id="ovvUnderlying" xreflabel="underlying"><title>Underlying Dialog Creation</title>
<para>
The dialog and dialog control objects in ooDialog represent the dialogs and controls users see on their screens.
This documentation often refers to the underlying dialog or the underlying control. These statements refer to the
dialog or control created by the operating system, the objects the user sees on the screen. The operating system
controls what these underlying objects can, and can not, do. One thing that it is sometimes difficult for the Rexx
programmer to grasp is that ooDialog can not alter the behavior or appearance of these objects in ways not allowed
by the operating system. The Windows API provides a broad number of ways to customize the appearance and behavior
of dialogs and controls. But, ooDialog and the Rexx programmer are restricted to those customizations provided
by the operating system.
</para>
<para>
Another concept that is often hard to grasp is that many of the methods of the ooDialog dialog and control
objects can only be used after the underlying Windows dialog has been created. In general this means in the
<xref linkend="mthInitDialog"/> method or later in the life cycle of the dialog. In particular, the
<xref linkend="mthDefineDialog"/> method of the <xref linkend="clsUserDialog"/> class executes before the underlying
dialog is created. Therefore, any method that requires the underlying dialog to have been created can not work in the
<emphasis role="italic">defineDialog</emphasis> method. In earlier versions of ooDialog, in general, if the programmer
invoked a method requiring that the underlying dialog was created, the error was simply ignored. But, the method
had no effect.
</para>
<para>
From the 4.0.0 release of ooRexx and on, the goal in ooDialog is to raise a syntax condition when a method
requiring the underlying dialog is invoked and the underlying dialog does not exist. This goal is being
implemented over time and may not yet be completed.
</para>
</section>
<section id="ovvUndocumented"><title>Undocumented Items</title>
<para>
ooRexx is open source and anyone can peruse the source to see all functions, classes, and methods of the ooDialog
framework. Any of these items that are undocumented should not be used by the Rexx programmer. If the programmer does
use any undocumented features in the framework, he does so at his own risk. The framework strives to be backwards
compatible, but only for documented features. Undocumented features in the framework are intended for internal use
only and are subject to change, or even removal from the framework.
</para>
<para>
In addition, previous versions of the ooDialog documentation, documented some features, but added some form of the
caveat: <emphasis role="italic">for internal use</emphasis>. The prudent programmer would not use any feature
documented for internal use. These features are also subject to change.
</para>
</section>
<section id="ovvSymbolicIDMechanism" xreflabel="mechanism"><title>Using Symbolic IDs in ooDialog:</title>
<para>
ooDialog allows programmers to use <xref linkend="defSymbolicId"/> resource IDs in their programs. The
symbolic ID can be used for any argument in any method that requires a resource ID. Although this is mostly
transparent to the programmer, if the programmer is going to use symbolic IDs, he should understand the basics of the
mechanism allowing the use of symbolic IDs.
</para>
<variablelist>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Resolving Symbolic IDs:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
ooDialog uses a <computeroutput>.Directory</computeroutput> object that consists of indexes that are symbolic names.
The value for the item at each index is the numeric value of the symbolic name. This gave rise to the object name of
<computeroutput>constDir</computeroutput>, which probably refers to a directory of constants (symbols.) When an
argument in a method is a resource ID, ooDialog first checks to see if the argument is a whole number. If so, it
simply uses the number. When the argument is not a number, ooDialog uses the argument to do a look up in the
constant directory object. If the argument matches an index in the object, the value of the index is used as the
numeric value of the resource ID. When the argument does not match an index in the constDir, the method fails.
</para> </listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">constDir Attribute:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
Originally the constDir was implemented as an <xref linkend="atrConstDir"/> of the dialog object. Each
dialog object then has its own constDir, which was used to resolve symbolic IDs where needed in the methods of the
dialog. Each dialog control has a reference to its owner dialog, allowing the dialog object's constDir to be used to
resolve symbolic IDs for the methods of the control. This mechanism exists unchanged in the current ooDialog
framework.
</para>
<para>
However, as enhancements to ooDialog started to be made in version 4.0.0 and later, it became apparent that the
constDir attribute was not adequate. Classes such as the <xref linkend="clsMenu"/> classes and
<xref linkend="clsResourceImage"/> class also used resource IDs, but objects of these classes are
independent of any dialog object. Without access to a dialog object, there was no way in those classes to use symbolic
IDs. To fix this problem, ooDialog 4.2.0 added the global <computeroutput>.constDir</computeroutput> to the
mechanism for using symbolic IDs.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Global .constDir object:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
The global <xref linkend="dotConstDir"/> works in the same way as the dialog object's constDir attribute.
When a symbolic ID needs to be resolved, it can be looked up in the global <computeroutput>.constDir</computeroutput>.
The integration of the global <computeroutput>.constDir</computeroutput> into the mechanism for resolving symbolic
IDs is done by allowing the programmer to specify how, or even if, the <computeroutput>.constDir</computeroutput>
should be used. The four choices are <emphasis role="italic">only</emphasis>, <emphasis
role="italic">first</emphasis>, <emphasis role="italic">last</emphasis>, or <emphasis
role="italic">never</emphasis>. The programmer specifies which of these strategies is to be used through one of the
methods of the <xref linkend="dotApplication"/>. (The
<computeroutput>.application</computeroutput> object is an instance of the
<xref linkend="clsApplicationManager"/> class.)
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry id="entConstDirStrategy" xreflabel="strategy"><term><emphasis role="bold">Global .constDir Usage
Strategies:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
The four strategies work this way.
<variablelist>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Only:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
With this strategy, symbolic IDs are only placed in the <computeroutput>.constDir</computeroutput> and only
looked up through that object. When a new dialog object is instantiated, rather than assign a newly instantiated
<computeroutput>.Directory</computeroutput> object to its constDir attribute, the global
<computeroutput>.constDir</computeroutput> is assigned to the attribute. This is by far the most efficient way to
use symbolic IDs in an ooDialog program.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">First:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
When the ooDialog framework needs to resolve a symbolic ID, it will first try to resolve it using the
<computeroutput>.constDir</computeroutput>. If that fails, it will then try to resolve it using the constDir
attribute. If that then fails, the method will fail.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Last:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
This is the reverse of the use <emphasis role="italic">first</emphasis> strategy. The ooDialog framework first
tries to resolve a symbolic ID in the constDir attribute. If that fails, the
<computeroutput>.constDir</computeroutput> is tried.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Never:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
The <computeroutput>.constDir</computeroutput> is never used in the program. To preserve backwards compatibility,
this is the default.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
</variablelist>
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Adding Symbols:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
A few symbolic IDs are <link linkend="ovvPreDefinedSymbolicIDs">pre-defined</link> by ooDialog and are always
present in the constant directory. These symbolic IDs can be used in any ooDialog program. Other than the
pre-defined IDs, the programmer must add symbolic IDs in order to use them in a program.
</para>
<para>
The easiest way to add symbols is to have the ooDialog framework add the symbols itself from a file. Whenever
ooDialog parses a resource <xref linkend="defResourceScript"/> or a
header <xref linkend="defHeaderFile"/>, it automatically adds any symbol
<xref linkend="defPoundDefine"/>s it finds to a constant directory. Which constant directory is dependent
on the global <computeroutput>.constDir</computeroutput> usage strategy in effect.
</para>
<para>
Resource scripts are parsed whenever a <xref linkend="clsRcDialog"/>, or subclass, is instantiated.
In addition, all the ooDialog dialog classes accept a header file as an optional parameter when a new instance of a
dialog object is created. (See for example the <computeroutput>new</computeroutput> method in the
<xref linkend="mthNewDialogObject"/> object or the <xref linkend="mthNewClsUserDialog"/>
class.) If the programmer supplies the optional header file argument, the ooDialog framework automatically parses
the file and adds all defined symbols it finds in the file to a constant directory. Again, to be clear, which
constant directory the symbol is placed in is dependent on which <computeroutput>.constDir</computeroutput>
<xref linkend="entConstDirStrategy"/> the programmer has elected to use.
</para>
<para>
In practice, most resource scripts are written by <xref linkend="defResourceEditor"/>s and place the symbol definitions
in a separate header file. Therefore having the ooDialog framework read and parse a header file is the most practical way
to add symbols to a constant directory. In addition to using the optional header file argument in the <xref
linkend="mthNewDialogObject"/> method of a dialog, the ooDialog framework provides some additional methods for reading a
file and adding the symbol definitions to a constant directory. The dialog object has the <xref
linkend="mthParseIncludeFile"/> method. The <xref linkend="clsApplicationManager"/> class has several methods, which are
accessed through the <xref linkend="dotApplication"/>. These are: the <xref linkend="mthUseGlobalConstDir"/>, <xref
linkend="mthAddToConstDir"/>, <xref linkend="mthSetDefaults"/>, and <xref linkend="mthParseIncludeFile"/> methods.
</para>
<para>
Of course, symbolic IDs can also be added directly in the program as the following code snippet shows:
</para>
<programlisting>
<![CDATA[
::method init
forward class (super) continue
self~constDir[IDC_GB] = 101
self~constDir[IDC_CB_REGINA] = 107
self~constDir[IDC_CB_REGINALD] = 111
self~constDir[IDC_CB_OOREXX] = 115
...
::method defineDialog
self~createGroupBox(IDC_GB, 10, 20, 150, 90, "BORDER", "Pick an interpreter")
self~createCheckBox(IDC_CB_REGINA, 30, 40, , , "GROUP", "Regina")
self~createCheckBox(IDC_CB_REGINALD, 30, 60, , , , "Reginald")
self~createCheckBox(IDC_CB_OOREXX, 30, 80, , , , "ooRexx")
...
::method ok
oorexxCB = self~newCheckBox(ID_CB_OOREXX)
if oorexxCB~checked then
say "You picked the right interpreter."
]]>
</programlisting>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Classes Requiring the Global .constDir for Symbolic IDs:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
As explained previously, the dialog object's <xref linkend="atrConstDir"/> attribute allows programmers to use symbolic
IDs for arguments requiring resource IDs in the methods of the <xref linkend="chpDialogObject"/> object and the dialog
<xref linkend="chpDialogControlObject"/> object. However, the ooDialog framework contains other classes with methods
requiring resource IDs. The <xref linkend="clsMenu"/> classes and the <xref linkend="clsResourceImage"/> class are
examples of these classes. If the programmer wishes to use symbolic IDs in classes other than the dialog and dialog
control classes, then the global <computeroutput>.constDir</computeroutput> <emphasis role="bold">must</emphasis> be
used.
</para>
<para>
Programmers that do not want to use the <computeroutput>.constDir</computeroutput>, <emphasis
role="bold">must</emphasis> use numeric resource IDs for any argument requiring a resource ID in any of the classes
other than the dialog and dialog control classes.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Global .constDir Pros:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
Using the global <computeroutput>.constDir</computeroutput> is by far the most efficient way to use symbolic IDs in
ooDialog programs.
</para>
<para>
Using the global <computeroutput>.constDir</computeroutput> allows large applications with many dialogs to read the
symbol file one time only. When using the dialog object's <computeroutput>constDir</computeroutput> attribute, the
symbol file would need to be constantly re-read, once for each dialog.
</para>
<para>
Using the global <computeroutput>.constDir</computeroutput> allows the programmer to use symbolic IDs for any method
in any object that requires a resource ID.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Global .constDir Cons:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
The <computeroutput>.constDir</computeroutput> does have some restrictions. These restrictions may be a reason for
some programmers to prefer to not use the <computeroutput>.constDir</computeroutput>. Depending on one's point of
view, many of the cons could be viewed as pluses.
</para>
<para>
The indexes in the <computeroutput>.constDir</computeroutput> are case sensitive. However, this allows symbol
resolution to be more efficient and faster. Case sensitivity is not a problem if a distinctive naming scheme is used
for symbolic IDs where the symbol names would never be used for variable names, and the symbol names are never
quoted.
</para>
<para>
If a symbolic name can not be resolved, a syntax condition is raised. However, the only reason a symbol would not be
resolved is if the programmer used an incorrect symbol. The raised syntax condition would alert the programmer to an
error in the program early in the development cycle.
</para>
<para>
Since all symbolic IDs are in one constant directory, duplicate symbol names can not be used in different dialogs,
unless the duplicate symbol names are assigned a single numeric value. (In which case they are not actually
duplicates.) For example, take a program that has two different dialogs in it, each with an edit control in the
dialog. If the programmer's habit is to use a symbol of IDC_EDIT for edit controls, there could be a conflict if the
edit control in the first dialog, had a define like this: <computeroutput>#define IDC_EDIT 100</computeroutput> and
the edit control in the second dialog had a define like this: <computeroutput>#define IDC_EDIT
200</computeroutput>. The solution to this is too either use two different symbols for the two edit controls, or use
the same resource ID number for both edit controls.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
</variablelist>
</section>
<section id="ovvWindowMessages" xreflabel="message"><title>Window Messages</title>
<para>
In the Windows operating system, not surprisingly, most everything is a window. In a nutshell, the Windows operating
system works by routing and sending <emphasis role="italic">messages</emphasis> to these windows. Each window has a
<emphasis role="italic">message processing loop</emphasis> where the window waits for a message to arrive, processes
it, and then waits for the next message. Each window message has an unique whole number ID that gives meaning to the
message. When a message is sent to a window, it is sent with two arguments. The first argument is of a type called
WPARAM and the second is a type called LPARAM. These types are opaque and the value of each is dependent on the
specific message. Either or both of the arguments may have no meaning for the specific message. The window always
returns a value, another opaque type called LRESULT, which again may have no meaning for the particular message.
</para>
<para>
In general, most of what ooDialog does is done by sending window messages to the operating system windows. This is
designed to allow the Rexx programmer to use dialogs without understanding any of the details of window messages.
However, the ooDialog framework provides a few generic methods that send window messages to the underlying operating
system windows. These methods, in contrast to most methods, can not be used by the Rexx programmer without some
knowledge of the window message being sent. The methods are clearly marked. The programmer would need to consult the
Windows <xref linkend="defWindowsDoc"/> to understand what both the WPARAM and LPARAM arguments
must be, and to understand what the LRESULT return, if any, means. In addition, the programmer would need to determine
the numeric value of the window message ID. This could be done using a
Windows platform <xref linkend="defPlatformSDK"/>, or perhaps through a Google search.
</para>
<para>
These generic send messages methods allow Rexx programmers to send any message to any of the underlying windows in
their programs. The caveat is that the programmers will have to research the meaning of the messages, their arguments,
and their return values themselves.
</para>
</section>
</section> <!-- End: Common Concepts -->
<section id="sctHistory"><title>History</title>
<para>
ooDialog is a Windows only extension to Open Object Rexx and appeared in the first version of IBM's Object Rexx for
Windows. This section attempts to give a rough over-view of the history of ooDialog and continues with notes pertaining to
the sequential releases of ooDialog past ooDialog 4.1.2
</para>
<section id="sctPreHistory"><title>Prehistory Timeline</title>
<para>
Object REXX for Windows NT &amp; 95 Interpreter Edition V1.0 was announced very early in 1997. It included ooDialog and
could run on Windows 95 and Windows NT 3.5. However, comments within the code and sections of code itself in ooDialog,
indicate that at one point ooDialog could run on Windows 3.0 and 3.1.
</para>
<para>
IBM announced and released several successive versions of Object Rexx for Windows over the following years. For
instance, Object REXX for Windows V2R1 was announced March 2001. In May 2004, IBM announced its intention to
contribute the source code for Object Rexx to RexxLA, and the ooRexx project was born. It took the best part of a year
to work out the details and for the ooRexx developers to get the first version of ooRexx built and released. ooRexx
3.0, the first ooRexx release, took place on March 25th 2005.
</para>
<para>
From that point, the ooRexx team began regularly releasing new versions of ooRexx, up through the release of ooRexx
3.2.0 on November 5, 2007. After the release of 3.2.0, the ooRexx team concentrated on refactoring the interpreter and
on adding a new set of native APIs used to write extensions to the ooRexx interpreter. The new APIs allowed the
passing ooRexx objects to the routines and methods used in extensions. Previously, only strings could be passed to
external libraries. The refactored ooRexx interpreter and the new native APIs were introduced in ooRexx 4.0.0,
released in August 2009.
</para>
<para>
Up until that release in the middle of 2009, ooDialog remained virtually unchanged. The evolution of the Windows
operating system had passed it by. ooDialog was designed for Windows 3.1, or at the latest Windows 95. It still
referred to dialog controls such as the list-view as "new" controls. Despite the fact that the list-view control had
been in use for over a decade. Some controls were considered "advanced" in ooDialog, while in Windows itself they were
considered old news.
</para>
<para>
Much of the design of ooDialog was based on constraints that existed in Windows 3.1 and Windows 95 that no longer
existed in modern operating systems. For instance, the reason for having three separate ooDialog class files,
<computeroutput>OODPLAIN.CLS, OODIALOG.CLS, and OODWIN32.CLS</computeroutput>, and for providing the simpler
<computeroutput>PlainUserDialog</computeroutput> class was to have a smaller package that required less system
resources for ordinary user interfaces like the standard dialogs. That reason is not as valid in modern times as it
was when ooDialog was being developed to run on Windows 3.1. Many of the programming techniques in the ooDialog
implementation were also outdated. The conversion of dialog units to pixels and vice versa in ooDialog is a good
example. While the technique must have worked in very early versions of Windows, it is completely wrong in Windows XP
and later.
</para>
<para>
The release of the new C++ native APIs in ooRexx 4.0.0 allowed much richer extensions to the Rexx interpreter to be
written. Extensions could be implemented that had access to the actual objects instantiated within the
interpreter. During the release of ooRexx 4.0.0, the internal work was started to convert ooDialog to use the C++
APIs. This work lead to the complete refactoring of the ooDialog code, and the effort to bring ooDialog up to the
level of Windows Vista and Windows 7 got started. New dialog controls were added along with new dialog objects and
methods. However, this work was done in the internal development source tree and was not ready for the 4.0.0, 4.0.1,
and 4.1.0 releases of ooRexx. Although ooDialog in those releases had some improvements and enhancements, they were
minor.
</para>
<para>
ooRexx 4.1.0 was released in December 2010. At that time, the internal work to convert ooDialog to the C++ APIs and
the refactoring of the ooDialog source code was complete, but the refactored ooDialog was not ready for release,
primarily because the documentation was not complete. The ooDialog distributed with ooRexx 4.1.0 was essentially the
same as the ooDialog distributed with ooRexx 4.0.0, with bug fixes and some small enhancements. A small bug fix
version of ooRexx 4.1.1 was released in March 2012. The ooDialog distributed in 4.1.1 is identical to the 4.1.0
ooDialog.
</para>
<para>
When the work of getting ooRexx 4.1.0 out the door was finished, some observations about ooDialog were made. One was
that previously no real versioning of ooDialog was done. The second was that each of the ooDialogs shipped with ooRexx
4.0.0, 4.0.1, and 4.1.0 only required an ooRexx 4.0.0 interpreter to work, while the refactored ooDialog in the
internal development source tree required an ooRexx 4.1.0 interpreter. The third observation was that, since ooDialog
is an extension to the Rexx interpreter, there is no reason why it could not be distributed independently of the
ooRexx interpreter. Finally, it had been observed from some comments made in bugs opened up against ooDialog, that
there were a few people who seemed to prefer to remain with an ooDialog that was designed for Windows 95, in essence
an ooDialog unchanged from the ooDialog shipped with ooRexx 3.2.0.
</para>
<para>
This lead to the decision to define a more formal versioning scheme for ooDialog and also to implement a means to
distribute ooDialog independently of the ooRexx distribution. The version string of ooDialog had already been defined
to be the version string of the ooRexx interpreter ooDialog was built under. A second part of the ooDialog version was
to be the ooDialog level. This is similar to the language level of the Rexx interpreter. The initial ooDialog levels
are listed in this table:
</para>
<table id="tblOODialogLevels" frame="all" pgwide='1'>
<title>ooDialog Levels</title>
<tgroup cols="3">
<colspec align='left' colwidth='1*' />
<colspec align='left' colwidth='1*' />
<colspec align='left' colwidth='6*' />
<thead>
<row>
<entry>Level</entry>
<entry>Required Interpreter</entry>
<entry>Description</entry>
</row>
</thead>
<tbody>
<row>
<entry>4.0.0</entry>
<entry>4.0.0</entry>
<entry>ooDialog implementation using Rexx classic external routines and the 3.2.0 ooDialog code.</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>4.1.0</entry>
<entry>4.0.0</entry>
<entry>ooDialog as shipped with ooRexx 4.0.0 with all bug fixes through ooRexx 4.1.2.</entry>
</row>
<row>
<entry>4.2.0</entry>
<entry>4.1.0</entry>
<entry>Refactored ooDialog completely implemented with the C++ native API.</entry>
</row>
</tbody>
</tgroup>
</table>
<variablelist>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Level 4.0.0</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
The ooDialog code at level 4.0.0 is frozen. Since the implementing code uses the classic external routines and the
code itself is unchanged from the ooDialog shipped with ooRexx 3.2.0, ooDialog programs should behave
exactly as they did under the ooDialog shipped with ooRexx 3.2.0. The only difference is that the ooDialog code at
the 4.0.0 level can be compiled for a 64-bit ooRexx installation. No fixes, enhancements, or changes will be made
to the code.
</para>
<para>
ooDialog 4.0.0 is available as a separate download from SourceForge for users who would like to replace their
installed ooDialog with a 4.0.0 level ooDialog. It requires that the installed ooRexx is 4.0.0 or later. Although
the code is frozen, if a user can demonstrate an ooDialog program behaves differently using a 4.0.0 level ooDialog
than it did under an actual ooRexx 3.2.0 installation, a fix will be considered.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Level 4.1.0</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
ooDialog at level 4.1.0 is the ooDialog that shipped with ooRexx 4.0.0, plus all bug fixes and changes up through
ooRexx 4.1.2. It is also provided as a separate download on SourceForge and also requires the installed ooRexx be
4.0.0 or later. This code is frozen, no changes will be made to the code. Bugs found in this code will be fixed in
upcoming releases of ooDialog.
</para>
<para>
It allows users that have not upgraded their ooRexx from 4.0.0 or 4.0.1 to pick up the bug fixes in ooDialog
included in the ooRexx distributions up through ooRexx 4.1.1. However, its primary purpose is for users who may be
unhappy with the future direction of ooDialog. It will provide a way for users to upgrade to future versions of
ooRexx and yet retain an unchanged ooDialog.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Level 4.2.0</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
This is the actively maintained ooDialog level. The level will be incremented in the future as circumstances
dictate. It requires an installed ooRexx of 4.1.0 or later. New versions of ooDialog at the 4.2.0 level will be
released as they become ready. It is available as a separate download from SourceForge and will also be the
ooDialog level shipped with future versions of ooRexx, (versions past ooRexx 4.1.2.)
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
</variablelist>
<para>
Note that as of July 2012, all versions of ooDialog from level 4.0.0 on are available as independent installations and
are available for download from SourceForge. Any version of ooDialog can be installed independently to an ooRexx
installation, provided the ooRexx installation meets the minimum required for the ooDialog version.
</para>
</section> <!-- End Section Prehistory Timeline -->
<section id="sct420Release"><title>ooDialog Release 4.2.0</title>
<para>
ooDialog 4.2.0 was relased in late August of 2012. It was the first major enhancement of ooDialog in over a decade. This
ooDialog has a lot of new and different things in it. In addition to the new dialog classes, new dialog control classes,
new methods on existing classes, it includes design changes intended to simplify areas of ooDialog
that seem to have been confusing in the past. Enhancements have been made that fix areas of ooDialog that have always
been broken. All ooDialog users should take a close look at these changes.
</para>
<para>
The over-all number of changes, enhancements, and new methods and classes are too numerous to list in minute detail.
The following lists the major areas of change.
</para>
<variablelist>
<varlistentry id="termMethodNameUnification"><term><emphasis role="bold">Unification of Method and Class Names</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
The Windows operating system provides an extremely large number of APIs to program GUI applications. To take
advantage of this, ooDialog needs to provide a large number of classes and methods in those classes. Over time, and
probably due to a number of different programmers working on ooDialog, this lead to a large number of similar, but
confusing method and class names.
</para>
<para>
In ooDialog 4.2.0 an effort has been made to unify the naming of methods and classes. To begin with, each dialog
control is named the same as it is in the Microsoft <xref linkend="defWindowsDoc"/>. An example
of this is the edit control. The name of the control is <emphasis role="italic">edit</emphasis>. Rather than call an
edit control an <emphasis role="italic">entry line</emphasis>, it is called an edit control. In addition, all dialog
controls are controls. Adding <emphasis role="italic">control</emphasis> to the control's name is redundant, and
confusing when it is done in some cases and not in other cases. A list-view is no longer called a ListControl, but
rather it is called a ListView, a tree-view is no longer called a TreeControl, it is called a TreeView.
</para>
<para>
Prior to 4.2.0, there were a large number of method names with the word <emphasis role="italic">connect</emphasis>
in them, with no rhyme or reason to the entire method name. To overcome this, a unified naming scheme has been
carried out. All methods with the name of a dialog control in them use the same name as Microsoft's documentation.
Method names with connect in them use a similar name for all methods that connect similar things. Methods that
connect a data attribute will have <emphasis role="italic">data</emphasis> in the name. Methods that connect an
event notification will have <emphasis role="italic">event</emphasis> in the name, etc..
</para>
<para>
The old names of these methods are now <xref linkend="apxDeprecated"/>, but still work. In order to
avoid conflicts with old, deprecated method names, certain groups of methods use a new verb in the name. All methods
that return an instantiated dialog control object begin with <emphasis role="italic">new</emphasis> and contain the
control name. I.e., <emphasis role="italic">newTreeView</emphasis>, <emphasis role="italic">newEdit</emphasis>, or
<emphasis role="italic">newTrackBar</emphasis>. All methods that create a dialog control in the dialog template of a
<computeroutput>UserDialog</computeroutput> now begin with the word <emphasis role="italic">create</emphasis> and
include the control name when a single control is being created. For example, <emphasis
role="italic">createListView</emphasis>, <emphasis role="italic">createUpDown</emphasis>, <emphasis
role="italic">createMonthCalendar</emphasis>. Similar naming changes are in methods connecting data attributes, in
methods connecting event notifications, etc..
</para>
<para>
The primary areas that should be looked at for this unification are the <xref linkend="sctCreateMethods"/> methods of
the UserDialog, methods concerned with connecting <link linkend="sctUnderstandingDataAttributes">data</link> attributes,
methods returning an <link linkend="sctInstantiateControls">instantiated</link> dialog control object, and methods that
<link linkend="sctMethodsEventNotification">connect</link> notifications.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Simplification of Requires Statements</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
Prior to ooDialog 4.2.0 there were three different ooDialog class files:
<computeroutput>oodPlain.cls</computeroutput>, <computeroutput>ooDialog.cls</computeroutput>, and
<computeroutput>oodWin32.cls</computeroutput>. An ooDialog program would need to <emphasis
role="italic">require</emphasis> (using a <computeroutput>::requires</computeroutput> directive) one or more of
these class files, depending on what parts of the ooDialog framework were going to be used. It was often confusing
to users as to which files needed to be required. Breaking the ooDialog framework into three peieces served no real
purpose. In 4.2.0, the three files have been combined into a single file. All ooDialog programs only need to
<emphasis role="italic">require</emphasis> the <computeroutput>ooDialog.cls</computeroutput> file.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Simplification of Inherited Classes</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
Previously certain dialog controls were deemed <emphasis role="italic">advanced</emphasis> and to use those controls, or
even to use some features common to all controls, the programmer needed to inherit the
<computeroutput>AdvancedControls</computeroutput> class. This was often confusing, and again there was no real reason for
it. The <emphasis role="italic">advanced</emphasis> controls were only advanced in the previous millenium. To simplify
this, the need to inherit the <computeroutput>AdvancedControls</computeroutput> class has been eliminated. The methods to
work with all controls are part of the base <xref linkend="chpDialogObject"/> object. The <link
linkend="deprecatedAdvancedControls">AdvancedControls</link> class is deprecated.
</para>
<para>
In 4.2.0 the <link linkend="deprecatedMessageExtensions">MessageExtensions</link> class is also deprecated. Connecting
<xref linkend="ovvEvents"/> notifications to a method in the Rexx dialog is such a fundamental part of using a dialog
that the programmer should not need to do anything special. The methods to connect events are now all methods of the base
classes where they are needed. The methods to connect dialog events are part of the base
<xref linkend="chpDialogObject"/>, methods to connect menu events are part of the <xref linkend="clsMenu"/> class,
methods to connect mouse events are part of the <xref linkend="clsMouse"/> class, etc..
</para>
<para>
ooDialog 4.2.0 no longer makes a distinction between a <emphasis role="italic">plain</emphasis> dialog and a
<emphasis role="italic">dialog</emphasis>. The <link linkend="deprecatedPlainUserDialog">PlainUserDialog</link> is
deprecated and no longer needed.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">True Call Backs from the Windows Message Loop</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
This is probably the most significant change in ooDialog 4.2.0. Prior to 4.2.0, window message
<xref linkend="ovvEvents"/> notifications were put into a queue to be dispatched at some later point
to the connected method in the Rexx dialog. But, the operating system expects a reply to its event messages, and the
reply allows the programmer to customize the behavior of the dialog. Because the programmer could not reply in any
way to the operating system, ooDialog was severely restricted in what it could support, compared to a normal Windows
application.
</para>
<para>
ooDialog 4.2.0 has been completely rewritten to use the C++ native APIs introduced in ooRexx 4.0.0. A primary
benefit of this is that now the ooDialog framework can directly invoke the connected event handling method in the
Rexx dialog and the programmer can directly reply to the operating system message. Further discussion on the
benefits of this is included in the section on <link linkend="sctCodingEventHandlers">coding</link> event handling
methods.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Correct Conversion of Dialog Units to Pixels</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
The ooDialog framework has always provided the <emphasis role="italic">factorX</emphasis> and <emphasis
role="italic">factorY</emphasis> attributes, whose intent was to convert between <xref linkend="defDialogUnit"/>s and
<xref linkend="defPixel"/>s. Unfortunately, the two attributes are based on a fallacy and are <xref
linkend="ovvInaccurate"/>. To compound the problem, many ooDialog methods internally use the attributes to convert
between dialog units and pixels, <emphasis role="italic">when no conversion is needed.</emphasis>
</para>
<para>
To fix this problem new methods, such as <xref linkend="mthDlgUnit2pixel"/>,
<xref linkend="mthPixel2dlgUnit"/>, etc., have been added that accurately convert between pixels and
dialog units. Methods that are inaccurate have had, matching, accurate, methods added to the ooDialog framework. The
accurate <xref linkend="mthGetRealPos"/> is added to match the inaccurate
<xref linkend="mthGetPos"/> method. The accurate <xref linkend="mthColumnWidthPX"/> is
added to match the inaccurate <xref linkend="mthColumnWidth"/>. The accurate
<xref linkend="mthMoveTo"/> is added to match the inaccurate <xref linkend="mthMove"/> method, and
so on.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">New Dialog Classes</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
New dialog classes have been added that implement true Windows property sheets, wizards, and dialogs that function
as controls. These classes replace the deprecated <link linkend="deprecatedCategoryDialog">CategoryDialog</link> and
<link linkend="deprecatedPropertySheet">PropertySheet</link> classes. The new dialogs are easier to use and easier to
understand because the pages of the dialogs are dialog objects that are programmed and behave using the same paradigm as
any other dialog.
</para>
<para>
These new dialog classes are available in ooDialog 4.2.0:
<itemizedlist>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsControlDialog"/>: Control dialogs work well as a dialog within a top-level
dialog. In essence, a <computeroutput>ControlDialog</computeroutput> functions as a dialog <emphasis
role="italic">control</emphasis> within the top-level dialog.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsRcControlDialog"/>: A <computeroutput>ControlDialog</computeroutput> based
on the <computeroutput>RcDialog</computeroutput>.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsResControlDialog"/>: A <computeroutput>ControlDialog</computeroutput>
based on the <computeroutput>ResDialog</computeroutput> dialog.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsUserControlDialog"/>: A <computeroutput>ControlDialog</computeroutput>
based on the <computeroutput>UserDialog</computeroutput> dialog.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsPropertySheetDialog"/>: The
<computeroutput>PropertySheetDialog</computeroutput> is an implementation of the Windows property sheet and the
Windows wizard. Unlike most ooDialog dialogs, the operating system does most of the management of these dialogs.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsPropertySheetPage"/>: <computeroutput>PropertySheetPage</computeroutput>
dialogs are used as the pages of property sheets and wizards.</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsRcPSPDialog"/>: A <computeroutput>PropertySheetPage</computeroutput> based on
the <computeroutput>RcDialog</computeroutput> dialog.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsResPSPDialog"/>: A <computeroutput>PropertySheetPage</computeroutput> based on
the <computeroutput>ResDialog</computeroutput> dialog.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsUserPSPDialog"/>: A <computeroutput>PropertySheetPage</computeroutput> based
on the <computeroutput>UserDialog</computeroutput> dialog.
</para>
</listitem>
</itemizedlist>
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">New Dialog Control Classes</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
Three new dialog control classes are available in ooDialog 4.2.0:
<itemizedlist>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsDateTimePicker"/>: A control that provides a simple interface with which to
exchange date and time information with the user.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsMonthCalendar"/>: A control that provides an easy to use interface which
allows users to select or enter dates. The control has the appearance of a typical calendar.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsUpDown"/>: A control that consists of a pair of arrow buttons that the user can
click to increment or decrement a value, such as a scroll position or a number displayed in a companion control.
</para>
</listitem>
</itemizedlist>
</para>
<para>
The new control classes are fully implemented so that all the functionality of the control, up through Windows 7, is
available to the ooDialog programmer.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Menu Classes</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
In ooDialog 4.2.0 menus are elevated to class objects. The menu classes more fully implement the functionality of
Windows menus, rather than just a small subset of the functionality as was done in ooDialog prior to 4.2.0. They
also make it easier for the programmer to create the menus needed for an application. These menu classes have been
added:
<itemizedlist>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsBinaryMenuBar"/>: A <computeroutput>MenuBar</computeroutput> created from a
binary resource, or by the programmer with the easy to use menu class methods.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsMenu"/>: The <computeroutput>Menu</computeroutput> class implements the large number
of methods that are the same for all menus.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsMenuBar"/>: A menu bar is often called the top-level menu. It is the bar positioned
just below the title bar of an application window or a dialog. The <computeroutput>MenuBar</computeroutput> class
implements the methods that are common to all menu bars.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsPopupMenu"/>: A menu bar contains submenus, and submenus can also contain
submenus. Submenus go by various names, including drop down menus, popup menus, context menus, and shortcut menus.
The <computeroutput>PopupMenu</computeroutput> class is an implementation of submenus, no matter which name it
goes by. Popup menus can be inserted into menu bars, or other submenus. They are also used as context menus. The
<computeroutput>PopupMenu</computeroutput> class implements the functionality of submenus, including the
functionality of true Windows context menus.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsScriptMenuBar"/>: A <computeroutput>MenuBar</computeroutput> whose menu
template is created by parsing a resource script, (usually a .rc file.) Similar to a
<xref linkend="clsRcDialog"/>.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsSystemMenu"/>: The <computeroutput>SystemMenu</computeroutput> class represents
the Windows <emphasis role="italic">system</emphasis> menu, which is also known as the <emphasis
role="italic">window</emphasis> menu or the <emphasis role="italic">control</emphasis> menu.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsUserMenuBar"/>: A <computeroutput>MenuBar</computeroutput> whose menu
template is created by the programmer using the methods defined by the class. Similar to a
<xref linkend="clsUserDialog"/>.
</para>
</listitem>
</itemizedlist>
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Other New Classes</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
There are a number of new utility and helper classes available in ooDialog 4.2.0:
<itemizedlist>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsApplicationManager"/>: Used to set application wide defaults and to
perform tasks that effect the entire ooDialog application.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsDayState"/>: Represents the state of each day in a month. A helper class for the
<xref linkend="clsMonthCalendar"/> control.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsDayStates"/>: A sequential collection of
<computeroutput>DayState</computeroutput> objects. A helper class for the
<xref linkend="clsMonthCalendar"/> control.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsMouse"/>: Provides all the methods to work with and manipulate the mouse and the
mouse cursor.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsOS"/>: Provides methods for extracting information about the operating system the
program is currently executing on.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsSM"/>: The attributes of this class reflect the system metrics or configuration
settings of the computer the Rexx program is running on.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsSPI"/>: The attributes of this class reflect the system-wide parameters of the
computer the Rexx program is running on
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsVK"/>: The <computeroutput>VK</computeroutput> class allows the programmer to use
symbolic names in a program instead of the numeric value of the virtual key codes. Unlike the
<computeroutput>VirtualKeyCodes</computeroutput> class in <computeroutput>winsystm.cls</computeroutput> the
<computeroutput>VK</computeroutput> class has constants for every virtual key code. Another advantage of the
<computeroutput>VK</computeroutput> class is that the programmer does not need to require
<computeroutput>winsystm.cls</computeroutput> in his programs.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsWindow"/>: The <computeroutput>Window</computeroutput> class allows the invocation
of methods common to every window.
</para>
</listitem>
</itemizedlist>
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">New Methods on Existing Classes</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
Many, many new methods have been added to both the dialog and the dialog control classes. Too many to list
individually. The documentation for each class has been expanded to include a complete method table for the class at
the start of the class documentation. The reader can glance through the method table to see which methods the class
has, which will give her an idea of the new methods available to that class.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">New Utility Objects</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
ooDialog 4.2.0 includes three new utility objects.
<itemizedlist>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="dotApplication"/>: The <computeroutput>.application</computeroutput>
object is an instance of the <xref linkend="clsApplicationManager"/> class that is present
in all ooDialog programs. It is used by the programmer to manage application wide settings, behaviour, and
constants.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="dotConstDir"/>) object: Part of the <xref linkend="ovvSymbolicIDMechanism"/> allowing the use of <xref
linkend="defSymbolicId"/> IDs in ooDialog programs. The <computeroutput>.constDir</computeroutput> is the most
efficient way to use symbolic IDs.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="dotSystemErrorCode"/> object: Can be used, at times, to obtain additional
information when the invocation of a method generates an operating system error.
</para>
</listitem>
</itemizedlist>
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Use of Objects as Arguments and Return Values</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
Prior to ooRexx 4.0.0, all arguments to and returns from external functions had to be strings. Although stems could
also be used, working with them was difficult and inflexible within the external function implementation. With the
advent of ooRexx 4.0.0, it became very easy to use any ooRexx object as an argument to, or return from, the ooDialog
external library implementation. In addition, instance methods can be implemented directly in the external library.
</para>
<para>
In the ooDialog released with ooRexx 4.0.0 through ooRexx 4.1.1, a very limited use of passing and returning objects
was begun. In ooDialog 4.2.0 extensive use of passing objects is present in the new classes and methods.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Raising of Syntax Conditions</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
Up through ooDialog 3.2.0 there was very little error checking and reporting in the ooDialog framework. Because of
this many things appeared to the user to simply not work. In many cases, the programmer was using incorrect
arguments to methods, or using the method incorrectly. In addition, detectable errors reported by the operating
system were simply ignored.
</para>
<para>
In ooDialog 4.2.0 syntax conditions are raised when incorrect usage is detected. There is also the new
<xref linkend="dotSystemErrorCode"/> object which is set when the operating system reports an error.
This is of great benefit to the programmer, especially when writing new programs. Incorrect usage, pointed out by
syntax conditions raised the first time the programmer tests his code, allow the programmer to quickly fix mistakes
she is making in her code.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Completely New Example Programs</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
There are many completely new example programs in ooDialog 4.2.0. Many of the new programs demonstrate the new
features in ooDialog 4.2.0. The intent with the new examples is to have a range of programs from the simple to the
more complex, giving help to newcomers and providing examples of how to move on to more complex real-world
applications. The ooDialog programmer should be sure to look through the many programs under the
<computeroutput>samples\oodialog</computeroutput> directory tree.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Updating of Existing Example Programs</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
Almost every existing ooDialog example program has been updated. Deprecate methods and classes have been removed. An
attempt to better comment the examples has been made. Some examples used <emphasis role="italic">internal use
only</emphasis> methods and this has been corrected. In other examples, the use of questionable techniques has been
removed. Even experienced ooDialog programmers can probably gain insight from looking through the existing examples
they have seen in previous ooDialog releases.
</para> </listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Revision of the Documentation</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
The ooDialog reference, this book, has been almost completely rewritten. The old reference was often incomplete,
misleading, and in many cases simply wrong. A large effort has been made to expand incomplete areas and to correct
misleading or wrong information. That effort is not 100% complete and will need to be finished in future releases.
However, the documentation is very much improved. If there were areas in the previous documentation not well
understood, the ooDialog programmer is encouraged to reread those sections in this document.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Deprecated Classes and Methods</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
ooDialog 4.2.0 has introduced the concept of <emphasis role="italic">deprecated</emphasis> methods and classes. All
<xref linkend="apxDeprecated"/> classes and methods are listed in <emphasis role="italic">Appendix
A</emphasis>. The deprecated classes and methods are no longer documented. When writing new code, the programmer
should not use anything deprecated. Wherever possible in existing code, deprecated classes and methods should be
replaced.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Backwards Compatibility</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
The ooDialog implementation has been largely rewritten and refactored. Every effort has been made to maintain
backwards compatibility. If a case is found where backwards compatibility is broken, it is likely that it was not
intentional, and the case should be brought up with the developers. The <emphasis role="italic">Getting
<link linkend="helpGettingHelp">Help</link> and Submitting Feedback</emphasis> section of this book contains a list of
numerous venues through which feedback can be submitted, or questions raised.
</para>
<para>
There may be a very few areas where maintaining backwards compatibility is not consistent with the intent to move
ooDialog past Windows 3.1 and on to Windows 7. If such an area is discovered, the ooDialog developers welcome any
reasoned discussion concerning how to deal with that area. Ultimately, the individual programmer may have to decide
if the benefits of moving ooDialog into the 21st century outweigh any effort to change existing code.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
</variablelist>
</section> <!-- End Section ooDialog Release 4.2.0 -->
<section id="sct421Release"><title>ooDialog Release 4.2.1</title>
<para>
ooDialog 4.2.1 was released in ... It is a 4.2.0 level ooDialog, which means it can be installed to any ooRexx installation
that is at least version 4.1.0. The following is a brief summary of the changes in ooDialog 4.2.1 from ooDialog 4.2.0.
</para>
<variablelist>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Bug Fixes in ooDialog 4.2.1:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
The following bugs were fixed in this release. The bug fix numbers can be used to look up details concerning the bug on
SourceForge
</para>
<itemizedlist>
<listitem>
<para>
* #1116 Debug print outs left in ooDialog 4.2.0
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #1117 Method handler passed wrong argument for TreeView EXPANDING event
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #1121 ooDialog appcrash running forward class(super) continue
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #1124 ooDialog - failed to locate .h file message incorrect
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #1126 ooDialog - args sent to the HELP event handler incorrect
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #1128 ooDialog UtilityClasses.cls: typo
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #1138 MessageDialog: Failure in system service
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #1141 ooDialog - connecting system menu command events can fail
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #1145 TimedMessage dialog remains on screen after ok() method is invoked
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #1146 Return code from ListView::deleteColumn() not as documented
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #1147 SingleSelection class
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #1149 Potential crash in ooDialog connectKeyPress() method
</para>
</listitem>
</itemizedlist>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Feature Requests Added to ooDialog 4.2.1:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
The following Request for Feature Ehancements were implemented in the release. Details concerning the enhancements can be
looked up on SourceForge using the listed tracker item numbers.
</para>
<itemizedlist>
<listitem>
<para>
* #42 OODialog List Control Class (report) format individual lines
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #130 OODialog List Control Class Activate sort headers
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #419 Add Tooltip control
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #420 Would like to have an AddButtonStem method.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #478 ooDialog - List-view could use a way to work with a complete row
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #483 ooDialog setColor and dialog background improvements
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #484 ooDialog setColor methods should not be restricted to the 19 palette indexes
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #485 Treeview itemData
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #486 ooDialog - the TreeView Expanding event should allow a veto
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #487 ooDialog - It would be nice if the TreeView class had a way to do custom sorting
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #488 ooDialog - TreeView class needs a itemText method
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #489 ooDialog - TreeView class should support info tips
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #490 ooDialog - ListView class should support info tips
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #493 ooDialog - TreeView begin / end label editing could be improved
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #494 ooDialog - ListView begin / end label editing could be improved
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #495 ooDialog TreeView control has missing styles
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #496 ooDialog TreeView methods to determine area occupied by an item
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #499 ooDialog connectTreeViewEvent CHANGING veto
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #501 The ListView class should have an easy way to switch views
</para>
</listitem>
</itemizedlist>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">New Functionality in ooDialog 4.2.1:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
An implementation that allows acces to the Custom Draw facility in Microsoft's Common Control library has been added.
</para>
<para>
Custom Draw allows, for example, the programmer to specify the text and ackground colors for individual rows in a
ListView, even for individual columns in the row. The programmer can specify the font of the text for individual
list-view items. Etc., etc..
</para>
<para>
The CustomDraw class has been added to ooDialog and is the means to access the Custom Draw facilities.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">New ListView support classes in ooDialog 4.2.1:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsLvItem"/> class: Represents a single list-view item. The attributes of the LvItem are the attributes
of the underlying Windows list-view item.
</para>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsLvSubItem"/> class: Represents a single list-view subitem. The attributes of the LvSubItem are the
attributes of the underlying Windows list-view subitem.
</para>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsLvFullRow"/> class: List-view items can contain subitems. This is most apparent in the row view of a
list-view where the subitems are displayed in columns next to the item. However, the subitems, once added to an item,
are always present, even if the list-view is in another view, such as icon view.
</para>
<para>
The LvFullRow class represents the list-view item and all its subitems. LvFullRow objects can be used to insert an item
and all data associated with the item into a list-view at one time.
</para>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsLvCustomDrawSimple"/> class: The LvCustomDrawSimple class is used in conjuction with the custom draw
facility for ListView controls.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">New dialog classes in ooDialog 4.2.1:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsCustomDraw"/> class: The CustomDraw class is a new mixin class. Dialogs in ooDialog can inherit this
class, which then gives the dialog the ability to access the custom draw facility.
</para>
<para>
The ListView and TreeView controls can register for custom draw.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">New dialog control classes in ooDialog 4.2.1:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsToolTip"/> class: Tooltip controls are pop-up windows that display text. Typically the text describes
a <emphasis role="italic">tool</emphasis>. A <emphasis role="italic">tool</emphasis> is either a window or an
application defined area within a window.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">New utility classes in ooDialog 4.2.1:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="clsTvCustomDrawSimple"/> class: The TvCustomDrawSimple class is used in conjuction with the custom draw
facility for TreeView controls.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">New Methods in ooDialog 4.2.1:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<variablelist>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">In the PlainBaseDialog class:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="mthGetTextSizeTitleBar"/>
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">In the DialogControl class:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="mthUseVersion"/>.
</para>
<para>
<xref linkend="mthUsingVersion"/>.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">In the ListView class:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="mthAddFullRow"/>
</para>
<para>
<xref linkend="mthInsertFullRow"/>
</para>
<para>
<xref linkend="mthPrependFullRow"/>
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">In the TreeView class:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="mthFind"/>
</para>
<para>
<xref linkend="mthGetItemDataClsTreeView"/>
</para>
<para>
<xref linkend="mthItemTextClsTreeView"/>
</para>
<para>
<xref linkend="mthRemoveItemDataClsTreeView"/>
</para>
<para>
<xref linkend="mthSetItemDataClsTreeView"/>
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
</variablelist>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">New Attributes in ooDialog 4.2.1:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<variablelist>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">In the SM (system metrics) class:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="atrCxSize"/>
</para>
<para>
<xref linkend="atrCxSmIcon"/>.
</para>
<para>
<xref linkend="atrCyMenu"/>.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
</variablelist>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Enhanced Methods in ooDialog 4.2.1:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<variablelist>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">In the DialogControl class:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="mthSetColor"/>
</para>
<para>
<xref linkend="mthSetSysColor"/>
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">In the DialogExtensions class:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="mthSetControlColor"/>.
</para>
<para>
<xref linkend="mthSetControlSysColor"/>.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">In the TreeView class:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="mthInsertClsTreeView"/>
</para>
<para>
<xref linkend="mthItemInfoClsTreeView"/>
</para>
<para>
<xref linkend="mthModifyClsTreeView"/>
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">In the EventNotification class:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="mthConnectListViewEvent"/>
</para>
<itemizedlist>
<listitem>
<para>
the KEYDOWNEX event is added.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
the BEGINEDIT event is enhanced
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
the ENDEDIT event is enhanced
</para>
</listitem>
</itemizedlist>
<para>
<xref linkend="mthConnectTreeViewEvent"/>
</para>
<itemizedlist>
<listitem>
<para>
the KEYDOWNEX event is added.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
the BEGINEDIT event is enhanced
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
the ENDEDIT event is enhanced
</para>
</listitem>
</itemizedlist>
</listitem></varlistentry>
</variablelist>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">New samples in ooDialog 4.2.1:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
<computeroutput>oodialog\controls\ListView\customDrawListView.rex</computeroutput>: The customDrawListView example
demonstrates how to change the text, text color, and background color of individual rows in a list-view.
</para>
<para>
<computeroutput>oodialog\controls\ListView\columnIcons.rex</computeroutput>: The columnIcons.rex example demonstrates how
to use the new LvFullRow class and how to use icons in the columns of list-view items in report view.
</para>
<para>
<computeroutput>oodialog\controls\ToolTip\toolTip.rex</computeroutput>: The toolTip.rex example demonstrates the basics
of using ToolTips in ooDialog. It includes the usage of a number of the ToolTip methods.
</para>
<para>
<computeroutput>oodialog\controls\ToolTip\customPositionToolTip.rex</computeroutput>: The customPositionToolTip.rex
example shows how to use the ToolTip class to do custom positioning of the info tips provided by the tree-view.
</para>
<para>
<computeroutput>oodialog\controls\ToolTip\manageControlTool.rex</computeroutput>: The manageControlTool.rex example shows
how to use some advanced features of the ToolTip class to provide completely customized ToolTips for a dialog control.
This example uses a tree-view control, but the techniques could be applied to any dialog control.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Enhanced samples in ooDialog 4.2.1:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
<computeroutput>oodialog\controls\TreeView\treeViewCustomDraw.rex</computeroutput>: The oodtree.rex example has been
renamed to the treeViewCustomDraw.rex and enhanced. The example has been more fully commented, uses custom draw for the
tree-view control, and has a number of small bugs fixed.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Documentation changes in ooDialog 4.2.1:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
The ListView Control chapter in the ooDialog Reference Manual has been partially reviewed and corrected for accuracy.
Parts of the chapter have been updated to match the format and style that was introduced in the rework of the manual
done for ooDialog 4.2.0
</para>
<para>
The TreeView Control chapter in the ooDialog Reference Manual has been partially reviewed and corrected for accuracy.
Parts of the chapter have been updated to match the format and style that was introduced in the rework of the manual done
for ooDialog 4.2.0
</para>
<para>
The documentation for the connectListViewEvent and connectTreeViewEvent methods have been enhanced.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
</variablelist>
</section> <!-- End Section ooDialog Release 4.2.1 -->
</section> <!-- End Section History -->
<section id="sctCurrentRelease"><title>Current Release</title>
<para>
The current release of ooDialog is 4.2.2. It is a 4.2.?? level ooDialog, which means it can be installed to any ooRexx
installation that is at least version 4.??.??. The following is a brief summary of the changes in ooDialog 4.2.2 from
4.2.1.
</para>
<variablelist>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Bug Fixes in ooDialog 4.2.2:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
The following bugs were fixed in this release. The bug fix numbers can be used to look up details concerning the bug on
SourceForge
</para>
<itemizedlist>
<listitem>
<para>
* xxx
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* xxx
</para>
</listitem>
</itemizedlist>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">Feature Requests Added to ooDialog 4.2.2:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
The following Request for Feature Ehancements were implemented in the release. Details concerning the enhancements can be
looked up on SourceForge using the listed tracker item numbers.
</para>
<itemizedlist>
<listitem>
<para>
* #504 It would be nice to be able to store a user value as part of the <xref linkend="clsLvFullRow"/> object
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #505 Would like a way to prevent Enter from closing dialog when in single-line <link linkend="clsEdit">edit</link>
control
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #506 Allow modifying a <link linkend="clsListView">list-view</link> item and all its subitems at once
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
* #507 ooDialog - Modify the text of a <link linkend="clsListView">list-view</link> item and all its subitems at one time
</para>
</listitem>
</itemizedlist>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">New Methods in ooDialog 4.2.2:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<variablelist>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">In the Edit class:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="mthWantReturn"/>
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term><emphasis role="bold">In the ListView class:</emphasis></term>
<listitem>
<para>
<xref linkend="mthModifyFullRow"/>.
</para>
<para>
<xref linkend="mthSetFullRowText"/>.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
</variablelist>
</listitem></varlistentry>
</variablelist>
</section> <!-- End Section Current Release -->
<section id="sctOODialogFuture"><title>Future</title>
<indexterm><primary>future directions</primary></indexterm>
<para>
The current future direction of ooDialog is to update ooDialog to take full advantage of the Windows 7 functionality
for graphical interfaces, related to dialogs. This includes adding more of the missing dialog controls, such as tool bars,
status bars, ip address controls, etc.. It also includes updating existing dialog controls to the full functionality
available to them in Windows 7.
</para>
<para>
There are a number of new classes introduced in ooDialog 4.0.0 through 4.2.0 that are intended to be enhanced in
furture releases. The <xref linkend="clsImage"/> and <xref linkend="clsImageList"/> classes
to name just a few. Work will continue on extending those types of classes. In addition work will be done on
implementing features requested by ooDialog programmers.
</para>
<para>
Work will continue on improving the ooDialog reference manual. Sections that were not reviewed for this release will
be reviewed and corrected. It is intended that the ooDialog User Guide will continue to be improved.
</para>
<para>
The users of ooDialog can take part in directing the future of ooDialog through discussion on the Users Mailing List
and by opening requests for enhancements at the SourceForge ooRexx project. Users can subscribe to the oorexx-users
mailing list on the <ulink url="http://sourceforge.net/mail/?group_id=119701"> <citetitle>ooRexx Mailing List
Subscriptions</citetitle></ulink> page. Requests for ooDialog features can be made on the
<ulink url="http://sourceforge.net/tracker/?group_id=119701&amp;atid=684733"><citetitle>ooRexx Feature
Requests</citetitle></ulink> page.
</para>
</section> <!-- End Section Current Release -->
<section id="reference"><title>ooDialog Class Reference</title>
<para>
The classes provided by ooDialog form a hierarchy as shown in The <link linkend="fig52">Hierarchy</link> of ooDialog
Classes. <emphasis role="bold"><emphasis role="italic">Unfortunately</emphasis></emphasis> this section is very out of
date. It will be updated in a future version of the ooDialog reference.
</para>
<figure id="fig52"><title>The Hierarchy of ooDialog Classes</title>
<mediaobject>
<imageobject>
<imagedata fileref="images/rxou0s12.jpg" scale="40" />
</imageobject>
</mediaobject>
<mediaobject>
<imageobject>
<imagedata fileref="images/rxou0s24.jpg" scale="40" />
</imageobject>
</mediaobject>
</figure>
<para>The classes are: </para>
<variablelist>
<varlistentry><term>PlainBaseDialog, BaseDialog</term>
<listitem><para>Base methods regardless of whether the dialog is implemented as a binary
resource, a script, or dynamically. PlainBaseDialog provides limited functionality.
</para></listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term>DynamicDialog, DialogExtensions, WindowBase, WindowExtensions</term>
<listitem><para>Internal mixin classes used to extend PlainBaseDialog, PlainUserDialog,
BaseDialog, UserDialog, and DialogControl. The methods provided by these classes
are not listed separately but are listed in BaseDialog or UserDialog.
</para></listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term>UserDialog</term>
<listitem><para>Subclass of BaseDialog used to create a dialog with all its control
elements, such as push buttons, check boxes, radio buttons, entry lines, and
list boxes.
</para></listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term>ResDialog</term>
<listitem><para>Subclass of BaseDialog for dialogs within a binary (compiled) resource
file (.DLL).
</para></listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term>TimedMessage</term>
<listitem><para>Class to show a message window for a defined duration.
</para></listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term>InputBox</term>
<listitem><para>Class to dynamically define a dialog with a message, one entry line,
and two push buttons (OK, Cancel).
</para></listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term>PasswordBox</term>
<listitem><para>Similar to InputBox, but keystrokes in the entry line are shown as asterisks
(*).
</para></listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term>IntegerBox</term>
<listitem><para>Similar to InputBox, but only numeric data can be entered in the entry
line.
</para></listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term>MultiInputBox</term>
<listitem><para>Similar to InputBox, but with multiple entry lines.
</para></listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term>ListChoice</term>
<listitem><para>Class to dynamically define a dialog with a list box, where one line
can be selected and returned to the caller.
</para></listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term>MultiListChoice</term>
<listitem><para>Similar to ListChoice, but more than one line can be selected and returned
to the caller.
</para></listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term>CheckList</term>
<listitem><para>Class to dynamically define a dialog with a group of check boxes, which
can be selected and returned to the caller.
</para></listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term>SingleSelection</term>
<listitem><para>Class to dynamically define a dialog with a group of radio buttons,
where one can be selected and returned.
</para></listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term>Dialog</term>
<listitem><para>Subclass of UserDialog for simple dialogs. You can change the default
dialog style from UserDialog to ResDialog.
</para></listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term>AnimatedButton</term>
<listitem><para>Class to implement an animated button within a dialog.
</para></listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term>DialogControl</term>
<listitem><para>Class to implement methods that are common to all dialogs and dialog
controls.
</para></listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term>TreeView</term>
<listitem><para>Class to implement a tree to display the list of items in a dialog in
a hierarchy.
</para></listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term>ListView</term>
<listitem><para>Class to implement a list-view to display the items in a dialog as a
collection.
</para></listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term>ProgressBar</term>
<listitem><para>Class to implement a progress indicator within a dialog.
</para></listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term>Trackbar</term>
<listitem><para>Class to implement a slider or trackbar within a dialog.
</para></listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term>Tab</term>
<listitem><para>Class to implement tabs, which can be compared to dividers in a notebook
or labels in a file cabinet.
</para></listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term>Static</term>
<listitem><para>Class to query and modify static controls, such as static text, group
boxes, and frames.
</para></listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term>Edit</term>
<listitem><para>Class to query and modify edit controls, which are also called entry
lines.
</para></listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term>Button</term>
<listitem><para>Class to implement push buttons within a dialog.
</para></listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term>RadioButton</term>
<listitem><para>Class to implement radio buttons within a dialog.
</para></listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term>CheckBox</term>
<listitem><para>Class to implement check boxes within a dialog.
</para></listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term>ListBox</term>
<listitem><para>Class to implement list boxes within a dialog.
</para></listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term>ComboBox</term>
<listitem><para>Class to implement a combo box, which combines a list box with an edit
control.
</para></listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term>ScrollBar</term>
<listitem><para>Class to implement a scroll bar within a dialog.
</para></listitem></varlistentry>
</variablelist>
</section>
</chapter>