Does MP3 gain normalize within single MP3s?

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2008-05-01
2013-05-09
  • egalitarian
    egalitarian
    2008-05-01

    I'm curious...  Does MP3 gain normalize audio volume WITHIN MP3 songs?  I inherited an album or two from a friend who scratched my CDs as replacements, and, well, I don't know if he used a P2P program or what, but the volume on the "hit" songs on the CD is all over the place like someone somehow had ripping software that allowed them to turn the volume up and down all throughout the song.  I didn't see any threads answering this specific question.  It looks like it'll sort of normalize songs between each other, but I'm just guessing how it works within individual songs... If it'll reduce the UP, down, up down on certain songs with the volume... Please notify me of any replies.

    Thanks friends.

    In solidarity,
    Egalitarian

     
    • I don't really understand what you're trying to say.  If you rip a CD, you probably do it so you get individual mp3s containing one song in each mp3.  If you then run mp3gain on all those mp3s, all those mp3s will be the same volume.  I *think* this is what you are saying.  So in this case, mp3gain will be doing what you want.  mp3gain will raise/lower the volume so that the song matches the replaygain 'radio' standard, and thus every song will sound about the same volume, and you won't need to adjust the volume control for every song.

      But, it also looks like you might be saying that you want to raise/lower the volume several times during a single song.  I think this is probably an incorrect interpretation of what you're saying, but from the way you worded it, this may be in fact what you're saying.  If this is what you're saying, then no, mp3gain won't do what you want.

       
      • egalitarian
        egalitarian
        2008-05-01

        The latter was the case.  Like I said, I think the friend who replaced my scratched CDs with MP3s used P2P programs to download those same songs.  And if I rip a CD, they all rip at the same volume.   And if a song is ripped, the volume is usually constant throughout the song. 

        But I think the RIAA is putting fakes up for Limewire and Torrent users to download that have songs that they purposely rip with volume that goes up and down within a song.  I think that downloading and sharing music is reaching critical mass and this is one tactic they're using to discourage people from so doing... Are you going to spend hours downloading and redownloading albums if 90% of those posted are filled with songs that have beeps and volume going up and down in them?  I actually talked to my friend about this, and he said there's Fenopy.  I don't want to do what he does frankly.   But I want to just fix these damn songs (or else I'll have to make him just buy me new CDs or MP3s, and that's what the recording industry, I think, is trying to force).  

        Anyway, I wish to normalize volume where it goes up and down over and over throughout a single song.   I wish you brilliant folks would help fight back by developing some kind of algorithm to look at a single song and 'fix' as best as it can be, the volume within a song.

        Thanks...

        [Steps on soapbox]
        I can't wait for these matters to get resolved.  I wish they'd realize consumers would increasingly prefer to download their music and resent their attempts to restrict consumer freedom to share music.  They argue it's all about the digital fidelity (copies of copies of copies of tapes sucked, so it limited unchecked sharing, bootlegging and teh like).  But I was turned on to so much music through mix tapes made by my friends for me over the years.   And if I liked a band, I bought their CDs.  I don't like to steal, even if I know the artist is making peanuts on actual album sales.  I support artists who aren't afraid of a paradigm shift where they can become more popular by supporting sharing and consumer rights, knowing that their fan base grows and so do their concert ticket sales where they make the lion's share of their income anyway.  And I too will say that I think music is intellectual property and I will respect those property rights.  But when the only viable source of electronic music is Itunes who makes you use their blankety blank blank AAC MP4 protected content and charges $.99/song, then I think they're asking for pirating quite frankly.  They don't give us choices.   We should be able to go to Itunes (who truly has a monopoly; I don't want Walmart's 'clean' music, and emusic has a very limited selection) and buy a whole album for $5 (no packaging or CD involved; they have bandwidth and licensing to pay for, yes; but $.99/song means $10-12 per album which is the same price as a CD and we're cutting out all of those costs with music), or an artist's discography for like $50 (depending on how prolific the artist, of course).   I think way more many people would just go legal and legit if it was actually not such a coerced thing.

        Anyway, thanks for your reply.   I will pray to the sourceforge gods that the geniuses over here will thwart the RIAA and make it possible to fix the damn audio on these songs my friend apparently downloaded.   Until then, I suppose I'll just have to beat him for scratching my CDs.

        Thanks.

        Egalitarian

         
        • If you still have the CDs, and they aren't scratched on the label side, check out some video rental stores to see if they offer a disc repair service.  Lots of them invest in a machine to fix scratches, rather than having to continually rebuy DVDs that renters scratch.  But if the scratches are in the label side, you're out of luck.  The protective layer on the bottom of the disc is thick and you can usually get rid of scratches.  But the protective layer on the label side is almost useless, and any scratches in the label are likely to have gone right through to the reflective layer and screwed the discs forever.