[4f355a]: README.HP Maximize Restore History

Download this file

README.HP    84 lines (68 with data), 4.1 kB

 1
 2
 3
 4
 5
 6
 7
 8
 9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
People tell me that HP uses compressed man pages named like
	/usr/man/man1.Z/ls.1
that is, the directory instead of the file has an extension.
I have no access to HP machines, and do not know the details
of this situation (what happens to cat files? to .so files?),
but perhaps this man is usable in such a situation if one puts
	MAN_HP_DIREXT=.Z
in the environment. Untested.

Tell me if this works, and if not what is wrong. 
I may yet gain access to an HP-UX box and verify this myself.
flc - flucifredi@acm.org

P.S.

A report mentions cat1.Z cat1m.Z cat2.Z ... cat8.Z
man1 man1.Z man1m man1m.Z ... man8 man8.Z man9.Z
subdirectories of /usr/share/man,
where the cat dirs are owned by bin:bin with mode 0777
and the man dirs are owned by bin:bin with mode 0555.

Scott Marovich adds:

As far as your GNU software is concerned, the first very important point is:
The paths used for compressed manual pages represent only the tip of a very
deep iceberg:  Historically, HP-UX derives from A.T.&T. UNIX System V (and
System III before that) with some selected BSD features added later, and it
doesn't even purport to be GNU-compatible.  For many years HP sold a binary
HP-UX port of the A.T.&T. Documenter's Work Bench as an optional product, and
HP-UX's versions of "man(1)" and "nroff(1)" (etc.) strive to be DWB-compatible.
Similarly, the manual pages use only plain, old, simple A.T.&T. "man(7)" macros,
HP-UX's standard data-compression utility command is "compress(1)"/"zcat(1)"
instead "gzip(1)", and HP-UX follows System V conventions about where to cache
formatted pages: they go into directories such as "/usr[/share]/man/cat*"
instead of "/var/cache/man" like under Linux.  System V "man(1)" can optionally
accept compressed input and/or produce compressed output, and it has a built-in
algorithm for deciding which directories to use.  Assuming, for example, that
manual page "foo.1" is requested, the algorithm works like this:

(Output-directory search:)
If a "/usr[/share]/man/cat1.Z" directory exists, look for a cached (formatted,
compressed) "foo.1" file in it; otherwise, if a "/usr[/share]/man/cat1"
directory exists, look for a cached (formatted, uncompressed) "foo.1" file in
it; otherwise, no formatted-and-cached form of the page exists.  After an input
page is formatted, it will be compressed and cached if the "cat1.Z" directory
exists, or cached without compression if only the "cat1" directory exists, or
discarded if neither exist.

(Input-directory search:)
If "/usr[/share]/man/man1.Z/foo.1" exists, then decompress and format this file;
otherwise, if "/usr[/share]/man/foo.1" exists, then format this uncompressed
file; otherwise, assume that the manual page is missing.

Notice that:

1. Priority is automatically given to fetching and storing manual pages in
   compressed form if the necessary directories exist.

2. Unlike GNU-compatible path naming schemes, the "regular" files containing
   [un]formatted manual-page text do *not* have ".Z" (let alone ".gz") suffixes;
only their containing directories do.

As far as these file's protection modes are concerned, that's partly up to a
local HP-UX system administrator.  If one prefers not to have "man(1)" be a
set-UID/GID binary, then the usual custom is:

     man?[.Z] directories   : mode 555
     man?[.Z]/<name>.* files: mode 444
     cat?[.Z] directories   : mode 777
     cat?[.Z]/<name>.* files: mode 666

i.e., any user can delete any other user's cached, formatted pages.  If one
prefers to run "man(1)" as a set-UID/GID program for a little more control,
then an alternative scheme is, say:

     cat?[.Z] directories   : mode 755/575
     cat?[.Z]/<name>.* files: mode 644/464

You also expressed some curiousity about the treatment of ".so" directives in
compressed manual pages.  The answer is simple: there aren't any.  ".so" is
rarely used in general, so the HP department responsible for producing HP-UX's
manual pages decided to "soelim(1)" the small number of exceptions (before
compressing the result) in order to avoid dealing with this problem.