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+<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" id="faq" xml:lang="en">
+<head>
+    <title>Frequently Asked Questions about Maxima</title>
+    <link rel="schema.DC" href="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/"/>
+    <link rel="schema.DCTERMS" href="http://purl.org/dc/terms/"/>
+    <meta name="DC.identifier" scheme="DCTERMS.URI" content="http://maxima.sourceforge.net/faq.html"/>
+</head>
+<body>
+
+<p><em>See also <a href="http://beshenov.ru/maxima/faq.html">http://beshenov.ru/maxima/faq.html</a>.</em></p>
+
+<h3>Introduction and installation of Maxima</h3>
+
+<h4 style="padding-top: 0; margin-top: 0">About Maxima</h4>
+
+<p>Maxima is a descendant of DOE Macsyma, which had its origins in the late 1960s at MIT. It is the only system based on that effort still publicly available and with an active user community, thanks to its open source nature. Macsyma was the first of a new breed of computer algebra systems, leading the way for programs such as Maple and Mathematica. This particular variant of Macsyma was maintained by William Schelter from 1982 until he passed away in 2001. In 1998 he obtained permission to release the source code under GPL. It was his efforts and skill which have made the survival of Maxima possible, and we are very grateful to him for volunteering his time and skill to keep the original Macsyma code alive and well. Since his passing a group of users and developers has formed to keep Maxima alive and kicking. Maxima itself is reasonably feature complete at this stage, with abilities such as symbolic integration, 3D plotting, and an ODE solver, but there is a lot of work yet to be done in terms of bug fixing, cleanup, and documentation. This is not to say there will be no new features, but there is much work to be done before that stage will be reached, and for now new features are not likely to be our focus.</p>
+
+<h4>What license is Maxima under?</h4>
+
+<p>It is licensed under <a href="http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/gpl.html">GPL</a> and hosted at <a href="http://sourceforge.net/">SourceForge</a>.</p>
+
+<h4>Downloading Maxima</h4>
+
+<p>Maxima can be download from the <a href="http://maxima.sourceforge.net/download.html">http://maxima.sourceforge.net/download.html</a>, which will redirect to sourceforge.net download page. It is available in Windows and Linux binaries as well as in source code form.</p>
+
+<h4>Installing Maxima</h4>
+
+<dl>
+    <dt>��� Where can I get a Windows installer?</dt>
+    <dd><a href="http://sourceforge.net/project/showfiles.php?group_id=4933">Sourceforge file manager</a>.</dd>
+
+    <dt>��� Where can I get Linux RPM���s?</dt>
+    <dd><a href="http://sourceforge.net/project/showfiles.php?group_id=4933">Sourceforge file manager</a> or via the <a href="/ports.html">Maxima ports</a> page.<br/>(See also <a href="/download.html">http://maxima.sourceforge.net/download.html</a>.)</dd>
+
+    <dt>��� Where can I get source code?</dt>
+    <dd><a href="http://sourceforge.net/project/showfiles.php?group_id=4933">Sourceforge file manager</a>.<br/>(See also <a href="/download.html">http://maxima.sourceforge.net/download.html</a>.)</dd>
+
+    <dt>��� Where can I get installation files for other systems?</dt>
+    <dd>Take a look at the <a href="/ports.html">Maxima ports</a> page.</dd>
+</dl>
+
+<h4>Useful links</h4>
+
+<ul>
+    <li><a href="/">Maxima homepage</a>.</li>
+    <li><a href="http://sourceforge.net/projects/maxima/">Maxima project page</a>.</li>
+    <li><a href="/maximalist.html">Maxima mailing list</a>, most questions are asked here.</li>
+</ul>
+
+<h3>General</h3>
+<h4 style="padding-top: 0; margin-top: 0">Who���s maintaining it now?</h4>
+<p>Since William Schelter���s passing a group of users and developers has formed to keep Maxima alive and kicking. We are currently in a transitional state, deciding what directions to go in next and seeing what our abilities and resources are. Maxima itself is reasonably feature complete at this stage, with abilities such as symbolic integration, 3D plotting, and an ODE solver, but there is a lot of work yet to be done in terms of bug fixing, cleanup, and documentation. This is not to say there will be no new features, but there is much work to be done before that stage will be reached, and for now new features are not likely to be our focus.</p>
+
+<h4>Is it free?</h4>
+<p>Yes. Maxima is distributed under the GNU General Public License, with some export restrictions from the U.S. Department of Energy.</p>
+
+<h4>I���m teaching a course using maxima. Can I post a copy of Maxima to a local webserver for my students to easily download?</h4>
+<p>Yes you can distribute Maxima, provided you keep the copyright notice intact.</p>
+
+<h4>Who wrote it?</h4>
+<p>Maxima is a descendant of DOE Macsyma, which had its origins in the late 1960s at MIT. It is the only system based on that effort still publicly available and with an active user community, thanks to its open source nature. Macsyma was the first of a new breed of computer algebra systems, leading the way for programs such as Maple and Mathematica. This particular variant of Macsyma was maintained by William Schelter from 1982 until he passed away in 2001. In 1998 he obtained permission to release the source code under GPL. It was his efforts and skill which have made the survival of Maxima possible, and we are very grateful to him for volunteering his time and skill to keep the original Macsyma code alive and well.</p>
+
+<h4>Macsyma vs. DOE-Macsyma vs. Symbolics Macsyma vs. Maxima?</h4>
+<p>The system developed at MIT was called Macsyma (although the nicknames MACSYM and MAXIMA were sometimes used since filenames were limited to six uppercase-only characters in sixbit character code).</p>
+<p>Symbolics licensed Macsyma from M.I.T. and registered ���Macsyma��� as a trademark at some point (presumably with M.I.T.���s permission).</p>
+<p>When Macsyma source ceased to be freely available, pressure was put on M.I.T. (mostly by Fateman) to transfer the code which had been developed largely with Department of Energy (DOE) funding to the DOE, which then released it to others under certain conditions.</p>
+<p>That codebase was called DOE Macsyma. I don���t know what legal rights the DOE had to the *name* Macsyma as opposed to the codebase, but presumably the non-commercial users of DOE Macsyma wanted to avoid any legal wrangling around the name, and started using the name Maxima at some point (but I don���t know when that was).</p>
+<p>So the short answer as I understand it is that Maxima is simply the most recent name for the branch that started under the name DOE Macsyma.</p>
+
+<h3>Lisp</h3>
+
+<h4 style="padding-top: 0; margin-top: 0">What LISP implementations will Maxima work with?</h4>
+<p>clisp, CMUCL and GCL are fully supported by Maxima; previous versions of Maxima only fully supported GCL. Ports to other ANSI lisps should be straightforward and are welcome; please contact the developers if you are interested in working on a port.</p>
+
+<dl>
+    <dt><a href="http://clisp.cons.org/">CLISP</a></dt>
+    <dd>clisp includes GNU readline support, so Maxima will have advanced command-line editing facilities when built with it. Maxima will fail to build with 2.26 because of a bug in clisp. 2.28 and 2.29 are known to work. There are currently unresolved problems with floating point numbers in Maxima with clisp 2.30. 2.29 is recommended.</dd>
+
+    <dt><a href="http://cmucl.cons.org/">CMUCL</a></dt>
+    <dd>CMUCL is the fastest option for Maxima on platforms where it is available. Unfortunately, it does not include readline support. However, readline support can be added by wrapping maxima with the <a href="ftp://ftp.inria.fr/INRIA/Projects/cristal/Daniel.de_Rauglaudre/Tools/">ledit</a>. Maxima will build with CMUCL 18c, but will hang on some run-time operations. 18d is known to work.</dd>
+
+    <dt><a href="http://savannah.gnu.org/projects/gcl/">GCL</a></dt>
+    <dd>2.4.4 and 2.5.0 should work. 2.5.0 has not yet been released as of this writing. The cvs version of 2.5.0 has been used to successfully build Maxima. GCL versions starting with 2.4.3 can be built with readline support, so Maxima will have advanced command-line editing facilities when build with it.</dd>
+</dl>
+
+<p><em>See also <a href="http://maxima.sourceforge.net/lisp.html">http://maxima.sourceforge.net/lisp.html</a>.</em></p>
+
+<h3>Installation problems</h3>
+
+<h4 style="padding-top: 0; margin-top: 0">Linux</h4>
+
+<dl>
+    <dt>��� When I try to install the Maxima rpm file, rpm complains that <code>"maxima_exec"</code> is a missing dependency.</dt>
+    <dd>You must install at least two rpms, <code>maxima</code> and <code>maxima-exec</code>. Go back to the SourceForge file manager and download a <code>maxima-exec</code> package and install that at the same time as the <code>maxima</code> package.</dd>
+
+    <dt>��� When I try to install rpm files, rpm complains about failed dependencies on stuff other than <kbd>maxima_exec</kbd>.</dt>
+    <dd>
+        <p>The Maxima rpms were created on a specific Linux system. Other systems have different versions of various libraries. To install Maxima, the library versions must be the same.</p>
+        <p>You might be able to find rpms for your specific Linux version via the <a href="/ports.html">Maxima ports</a> page.</p>
+        <p>You can recompile Maxima on your system. The rpms created that way have the right dependencies for your system.</p>
+        <p>To recompile maxima, you need a Lisp implementation. I���ll recommend <a href="http://clisp.cons.org/">Clisp</a>.</p>
+        <p>Once you have Clisp installed, download the Maxima src.rpm from the SF file manager. Unpack it and launch rpmbuild to create the rpm files:</p>
+        <pre>$ sudo rpm -ih maxima-5.9.3.src.rpm<br/>$ cd /usr/src/local   # or whereever it is that rpm puts the source code<br/>$ sudo rpmbuild -bb SPECS/maxima.spec</pre>
+        <p>Then install the rpm files which were created in <kbd>/usr/src/local/RPMS</kbd>.</p>
+        <p>You almost certainly need superuser privileges to write files to <kbd>/usr/src/local</kbd>, hence the <kbd>sudo</kbd>. Perhaps you can get your friendly system administrator to handle it.</p>
+        <p>If you create rpms, we can host them in the SF file manager; it would be helpful to anyone running the same Linux flavor.</p>
+        <p>The installation notes at <a href="/download.html">http://maxima.sourceforge.net/download.html</a> say a little bit more about rebuilding Maxima. In particular, follow the links to <kbd>README.lisps</kbd> and <kbd>README.rpms</kbd>.</p>
+    </dd>
+</dl>
+
+<h3>Run-time problems</h3>
+
+<h4 style="padding-top: 0; margin-top: 0">Windows</h4>
+
+<dl>
+    <dt>��� I can launch the Maxima GUI (either Xmaxima or WxMaxima), but then there is a timeout message and I don���t get any response when I enter some expression.</dt>
+    <dd><p><strong>Problem 1. Blocked socket</strong>. Maxima GUI programs talk to the computational engine through a socket. Antivirus and/or firewall programs see that and try to block it (because some malicious programs open sockets too).<br/><strong>Solution</strong>: Try to find the control panel for the antivirus and/or firewall. Find the Maxima GUI on the list of blocked programs and disable blocking for it. The GUI program might appear as ���Tcl/Tk��� (the name of the GUI toolkit for Xmaxima).</p>
+    <p><strong>Problem 2. Data execution prevention (DEP)</strong>. Some Lisp implementations execute code in data areas of memory. Windows DEP sees that and blocks it (because some malicious programs execute code in data areas too).<br/><strong>Solution</strong>: Include the full program path of the Maxima executable, for example: <kbd>C:\Program Files\Maxima-5.10.0\lib\maxima\5.10.0\binary-gcl\maxima.exe</kbd> in the list of DEP exceptions (Control Panel&#x00a0;��� System&#x00a0;��� Advanced&#x00a0;��� Performance&#x00a0;��� DEP)</p>
+    </dd>
+</dl>
+
+<h4>Linux</h4>
+
+<p><strong>Problem 1. Invalid entry for localhost in <kbd>/etc/hosts</kbd> file.</strong><br/><strong>Solution</strong>: Make sure there is an entry that matches: <kbd>127.0.0.1 localhost</kbd>, otherwise <kbd>wxmaxima</kbd> and/or <kbd>xmaxima</kbd> will be unable to resolve <kbd>"localhost"</kbd> to a valid IP and then fail with <kbd>"maxima terminated"</kbd>.</p>
+
+<h4>MacOS X</h4>
+
+<dl>
+    <dt>��� I am able to build maxima, wxMaxima, and wxMac thanks to the <kbd>README</kbd> in wxMaxima. I constructed <kbd>wxMaxima.app</kbd> and <kbd>maxima</kbd>, placing them next to each other. After starting wxMaxima I used the preferences to set the location of maxima and verified that it started by adding console print statements to <kbd>wxMaxima.cpp</kbd>. However, every attempt at simply algebra reports <kbd>"Not connected to maxima!"</kbd>. Before I try my hand at debugging this, your suggestions would be appreciated.</dt>
+    <dd>Probably your best bet is to report this problem on the wxMaxima user forum. Also, this wiki is for exposition as opposed to questions &amp; answers. It would help if you left some contact info so that someone could get back to you; just a thought. HTH.<br/>��� Robert Dodier.</dd>
+    <dd>There are reports that wxMaxima does not work if maxima is compiled with clisp or sbcl. I recommend that you use cmucl to compile maxima is you intend to use wxMaxima.<br/>��� Andrej Vodopivec.</dd>
+</dl>
+
+</body>
+</html>