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<!-- lircd.conf --------------------------------------------------------->
<A NAME="lircd.conf"><HR></A>
<H1 ALIGN="CENTER">Configuring lircd (the LIRC daemon)</H1>
<HR WIDTH="70%">
<OL>
<LI>Check if there is already a config file in
<em>/etc/lircd.conf</em>. If not</LI>
<LI>check if there is a config file available for your remote control
at the LIRC homepage and copy it to
<em>/etc/lircd.conf</em>. If not</LI>
<LI>start <em>irrecord</em> (finish all applications that access
<em>/dev/lirc</em> first) and follow the instructions given to you by
this program. Copy the resulting file to
<em>/etc/lircd.conf</em>.
</OL>
<P>If you want to use more than one remote control you can simply
concatenate the config files: <em>cat config1 config2
&gt;config</em></P>
<P><B>Note:</B> If you already have a config file for the libirman
package you can convert it using the <em>irman2lirc</em> script that
you can find in the contrib directory.</P>
<!-- lircd.conf fileformat ---------------------------------------------->
<A NAME="lircd.conf_format"><HR></A>
<H1 ALIGN="CENTER">The lircd.conf file format</H1>
<HR WIDTH="70%">
<P>There's no description of the file format available. In fact you
don't need to know anything about it except that it's maybe the most
important part of the package.</P>
<!-- lircmd.conf -------------------------------------------------------->
<A NAME="lircmd.conf"><HR></A>
<H1 ALIGN="CENTER">Configuring lircmd (the LIRC mouse daemon)</H1>
<HR WIDTH="70%">
<P><em>lircmd</em> can be used to emulate a mouse with your remote
control. Depending on the config file described in the next section it
converts IR signals into mouse events. It currently supports three mouse
protocols (MouseSystems, IntelliMouse and IMPS/2). For compatibility reasons
the default protocol is the MouseSystems protocol but the preferred is the
IntelliMouse protocol. The advantage of this protocol is its wheel-mouse
support. That way you can for example configure Netscape to scroll if you
press certain buttons.</P>
<P>IMPS/2 used to be the preferred protocol since it also has wheel-mouse
support and IntelliMouse was not available. However PS/2 protocol specifies
that the mouse must accept and reply to specific commands, and that can not be
done through the pipe <em>lircmd</em> uses. For this reason IntelliMouse
support was written and is currently the prefered protocol.</P>
<P>lircmd can basically be used with two applications: X11 and gpm<BR>
Configuration of both is described here:</P>
<H3>X11</H3>
<H4>3.x</H4>
<P>Just put this section in your XF86Config file to use the mouse in
addition to your normal one.</P>
<PRE>
Section "XInput"
Subsection "Mouse"
Protocol "IntelliMouse"
Device "/dev/lircm"
DeviceName "Remote"
AlwaysCore
EndSubsection
EndSection
</PRE>
Additionally you might have to add
<PRE>
Buttons 5
</PRE>
to your normal &quot;Pointer&quot; Section in order to make the wheel
buttons work. Of course you have to replace IntelliMouse with IMPS/2 or
MouseSystems if you really want to use one of this protocols. Colas Nahaboo's
<A HREF="http://www.inria.fr/koala/colas/mouse-wheel-scroll/">X mouse
wheel scroll page</A> gives you further information how to make use of
your new wheel mouse.</P>
<P>Make sure you use a current version of X11. There seems to be a bug
in X version 3.3 that can make X crash if you use both mouse and
remote control mouse simultaneously. At least I couldn't reproduce
this with other versions. I also received some notes that lircmd does
not work with certain X11 versions. But almost always at least one of
the protocols did work. So try them all before trying another X11
version. But always remember that you have to modify both XF86Config and
lircmd.conf so they use the same protocol.</P>
<H4>4.x</H4>
<P>
I received this configuration from a user. I didn't test it myself yet.
</P>
<PRE>
Section "InputDevice"
Identifier "Mouse2"
Driver "mouse"
Option "Protocol" "IntelliMouse"
Option "Device" "/dev/lircm"
Option "DeviceName" "Remote"
Option "AlwaysCore"
Option "Buttons" "5"
Option "ZAxisMapping" "4 5"
EndSection
</PRE>
<P>
Another mail I got pointed out that you will also have to add a line
to the ServerLayout section like this:
</P>
<PRE>
Section "ServerLayout"
...
InputDevice "Mouse2" <-- add this line
EndSection
</PRE>
<H3>gpm</H3>
<P>You can also e.g. use <em>multimouse</em> (available at <A
HREF="ftp://sunsite.unc.edu/">ftp://sunsite.unc.edu/</A> or mirrors)
or <em>gpm</em> to use it parallel to your normal mouse. With:
<PRE>
gpm -t ps2 -R -M -m /dev/lircm -t ms3
</PRE>
or.<BR>
<PRE>
gpm -t ps2 -R -M -m /dev/lircm -t imps2
</PRE>
or.<BR>
<PRE>
gpm -t ps2 -R -M -m /dev/lircm -t msc
</PRE>
I can use my usual PS/2 mouse and my remote control (IntelliMouse, IMPS/2
or MouseSystems protocol) at the same time to control the mouse
pointer.</P>
<P><B>Note:</B> If you update lircmd.conf you can send the HUP signal
to lircmd:
<PRE>
killall -HUP lircmd
</PRE>
This instructs lircmd to reread its config file. The same is true for
lircd if you change lircd.conf. lircd will also reopen its log file on
SIGHUP.</P>
<!-- lircmd.conf fileformat --------------------------------------------->
<A NAME="lircmd.conf_format"><HR></A>
<H1 ALIGN="CENTER">The lircmd.conf file format</H1>
<HR WIDTH="70%">
<P>The config file for lircmd is quite simple. Just look at the
example in the contrib directory. Some drivers even already bring
their config file for lircmd with them so lircmd is ready to run.</P>
<DL>
<DT>PROTOCOL&nbsp;&nbsp;&lt;<em>protocol</em>&gt;</DT>
<DD>
<P>
You can choose between MouseSystems and IMPS/2 protocol. The default
is MouseSystems protocol.
</P>
</DD>
<DT>ACCELERATOR&nbsp;&nbsp;&lt;<em>start</em>&gt; &lt;<em>max</em>&gt; &lt;<em>multiplier</em>&gt;</DT>
<DD>
<P>
Change the values here if your mouse pointer is moving too
fast/slow. Usually the mouse pointer moves 1 pixel every time it
receives a signal. The values here specify how much mouse movement
accelerates if you hold down the according button on your remote
control for a longer timer. The <em>start</em> value is the threshold
that starts acceleration. Then the amount of pixels is calculated with
the following formula: <em>x</em>=<em>repeat</em>*<em>multiplier</em>,
where repeat is the number of repeated signals. <em>max</em> specifies
the maximum number of pixels the pointer can move due to a single
command.
</P>
</DD>
<DT>ACTIVATE&nbsp;&nbsp;&lt;<em>remote</em>&gt; &lt;<em>button</em>&gt;</DT>
<DT>TOGGLE_ACTIVATE&nbsp;&nbsp;&lt;<em>remote</em>&gt; &lt;<em>button</em>&gt;</DT>
<DD>
<P>
I recommend that you use a special button to activate the mouse daemon
with this command. You will see whenever the daemon is
activated/deactivated directly on the screen. If you omit this command
the daemon will always be active.
</P>
<P>
The difference between ACTIVATE and TOGGLE_ACTIVATE is how you leave
the mouse mode. With TOGGLE_ACTIVATE you have to press the button that
you use to enter the mode to leave it. With ACTIVATE you will leave
mouse mode as soon as you press a button that is not used for any
function in the config file.
</P>
</DD>
<DT>MOVE_ [ N [ E | W ] | E | S [ E | W ] | W ]&nbsp;&nbsp;&lt;<em>remote</em>&gt; &lt;<em>button</em>&gt;</DT>
<DD>
<P>
The obvious functionality. You can even get better granularity by
combing different commands (copied from the config file for AnimaX
remotes):
<PRE>
MOVE_N ANIMAX_MOUSE_PAD MOUSE_NNE
MOVE_NE ANIMAX_MOUSE_PAD MOUSE_NNE
</PRE>
This also demonstrates that all commands are executed beginning at the
top.
</P>
</DD>
<DT>MOVE_[IN|OUT]&nbsp;&nbsp;&lt;<em>remote</em>&gt; &lt;<em>button</em>&gt;</DT>
<DD>
<P>
This will only work with the IMPS/2 protocol and indicates movement of
the wheel.
</P>
</DD>
</DL>
'*' is allowed as wild card for button and remote. Please note that
every line that fits to the received signal will be executed. Parsing
starts at the top of the file.</P>
<!-- .lircrc fileformat ------------------------------------------------->
<A NAME="lircrc_format"><HR></A>
<H1 ALIGN="CENTER">The .lircrc file format</H1>
<HR WIDTH="70%">
<P>At this point all you need are the tools, which react on the
signals decoded by lircd. To do this you need a file called
<em>.lircrc</em>. It should be placed in your home directory. The idea
is to have configuration information of all clients in one place. That
lets you keep a better overview of clients and simplifies the use of
modes explained later.</P>
<P>First I will explain the syntax of the .lircrc file itself. The
config file for LIRC tools consists of one or more of the following
constructions:</P>
<PRE>
begin
prog = ...
remote = ...
button = ...
repeat = ...
config = ...
mode = ...
flags = ...
end
</PRE>
<P>Bringing it to the point the above says which program
(<em>prog</em>) should do what (<em>config</em>, <em>mode</em>,
<em>flags</em>) if you press a certain button (<em>remote</em>,
<em>button</em>) a specified time (<em>repeat</em>).</P>
<DL>
<DT>prog</DT>
<DD>gives the name of the program that should receive the config
string given in config.
</DD>
<DT>remote, button</DT>
<DD>specify a key of a remote control that launches
an action. Key sequences can be specified by giving more then
one remote/button string. The character '*' can be used as a
wild card for remote or button. The default for remote is '*'.
</DD>
<DT>repeat</DT>
<DD>tells the program what shall happen if a key is repeated.
A value of zero tells the program to ignore repeated keys.
Any other positive value 'n' tells the program to pass the config
string every 'n'-th time to the according application, when a key is
repeated. The default for repeat is zero.
</DD>
<DT>config</DT>
<DD>is the string that will be passed to the according application
whenever the specified key sequence is received by lircd. If you
give more than one config string, the config strings will be passed
to the applications by turns. With this feature you can for example
implement toggle buttons.<BR>
You can pass non-printable characters to applications with all
standard C escape sequences (most common are: \n = line-feed, \r =
carriage return, \t = tab, \e = escape, \&lt;<em>n</em>&gt; = ASCII
code in octal representation, \x&lt;<em>n</em>&gt; = ASCII code in
hexadecimal representation, \\ = backslash). Additionally you can
supply Ctrl-X by specifying \X where X is an upper character or
@. For example \C is Ctrl-C.
</DD>
<DT>mode</DT>
<DD>tells the program to enter a special mode.
You can group several configurations by putting them into the
following, where mode stands for the mode where these configurations
should be active:
<PRE>
begin mode
...
end mode
</PRE>
If mode is equal to the name of a client application this
application will always start in this mode. Consider this
situation: you want to start <em>xawtv</em> with <em>irexec</em>
and enter the <em>tv</em> mode. Then irexec would enter the tv
mode but xawtv would begin without any mode enabled. By renaming
the mode from <em>tv</em> to <em>xawtv</em> you can solve this
problem.
<br>Another way to specify a startup mode is by using the startup_mode
flag as described bellow.<BR>
<BR>
<em>Caveat:</em> In order to avoid many identical entries all
actions that modify the mode a program currently is in are
independent of the <em>prog</em> token.
</DD>
</DL>
The following are valid flags:
<DL>
<DT>once</DT>
<DD>
This is only allowed in conjunction with the mode directive. The
config string is passed to the application only the first time the
mode is entered or you have explicitly left this mode. This is
useful for starting an application whenever you enter a special
mode.
</DD>
<DT>quit</DT>
<DD>Usually all configurations are examined if they have
to be executed. You can stop this immediately with this flag.
</DD>
<DT>mode</DT>
<DD>This is only allowed within a mode block. It tells the
program to leave this mode.
</DD>
<DT>startup_mode</DT>
<DD>Tells the program to start in the mode given in the mode keyword.
The following example tells the program to start in the <em>browser</em>
mode
<PRE>
begin
flags = startup_mode
mode = browser
end
</PRE>
</DL>
<P>Ok, now a simple example for a <em>.lircrc</em> file (supposed you
use an AnimaX remote and use the sample files for this remote from the
remotes/ directory. If you have another remote change <em>remote=</em>
and <em>button=</em> according to your remote [this definitions are
made in the <em>lircd.conf</em> file] )</P>
<PRE>
begin
remote = ANIMAX
button = MENU_DOWN
prog = irexec
repeat = 0
config = echo "Hello world!"
end
</PRE>
<P>
If you have saved this as <em>.lircrc</em> in your home directory,
start <em>irexec</em>. Press the button which is selected in the
<em>button=</em> line and you will see a 'Hello world!' on your
screen. As you can see irexec is a simple program launcher. Of course
you can do a lot more than just start programs.
</P>
<P>
If you start a LIRC client program, it reads your ~/.lircrc and reacts
only on prog= entries which point to itself. All programs should give
you the possibility to use an alternative config file. If you have
included more than one program in your .lircrc, then start all these
programs, they react only to their according entries in .lircrc. This
also leads to a disadvantage of the mode concept. If you don't start
all client programs at a time the mode they have to maintain may
differ between applications. Also key sequences might not be
recognized equally because all programs then don't have the same
starting point.
</P>