linux -- windows -- incompatibility ...

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2012-09-27
2014-10-03
  • ralf vollmann
    ralf vollmann
    2012-09-27

    hello,

    i would like to add an observation which makes my working life difficult:

    i am using linux libertine fonts since long, and i am using a number of linux machines and one windows machine; my collaborators mostly use windows.

    for using a font, i would assume that it can be installed everywhere and looks the same everywhere - well, mostly :-)

    unfortunately, when i write something on a linux machine in openoffice or libreoffice, the linux libertine font will not appear in windows; instead, times new roman (and sometimes ms-mincho) is added to the font specification.

    when i write a new text on windows in ms-word or libreoffice, then i will get an arial look on the linux machines.

    to begin with, the font name is not the same: on windows, i have to choose: linux libertine g. on linux: linux libertine. obviously, each machine does not find the right font …

    therefore, i installed the newest package in linux (as i did on windows before), replaced the old files and used fc-cache - but this behavior does not change.

    my problem: i need to make perfect layouts (with prespecified styles) in libreoffice or word files, often in collaboration with other people. i have collaborators who cannot deal with technical problems; i tell them to use linux libertine and my styles which i send as a document, but then, they don't see it on the screen and don't understand my aims … furthermore, they will mess up the layout of existing texts, if the font is not reliably secure and looks different on their machines.

    i do not understand how i could possibly install the same fonts on all machines, so that the texts always look the same. this is very important to me. i have switched a scientific journal to linux libertine, but get font problems now and cannot explain it to the writers and the co-editors … similarly, students are writing their theses with these fonts, but in reality have bad-looking fonts on their screen - thinking this is what i want from them … --- i am constantly annoyed by bad-looking texts which i have to revise.

    hoping for a solution to this problem from those who know :-)

    best wishes, thubtop

    p.s.: i like linux libertine for its beauty, but more specifically for the phonetic symbols. this is why i chose it actually.

     
  • David
    David
    2013-01-07

    thubtop
    … i am using a number of linux machines and one windows machine; my collaborators mostly use windows. …

    to begin with, the font name is not the same: on windows, i have to choose: linux libertine g. on linux: linux libertine. obviously, each machine does not find the right font …

    I have EXACTLY this problem. If the naming convetions were the same on all platforms, I don't think we would have this problem!

    Searching the issue list finds some related to file names, but I think not this exact problem (which others must have!), so perhaps I'll open one and see what happens.

     
  • I don't know if the problem is still current, but I believe you have already found the reason for it:

    "Linux Libertine" and "Linux Libertine G" are TWO DIFFERENT FONTS (actually, they are downloadable from different sites), the latter being a derivative of the former, modified to use the Graphite font engine.

    The solution seems, in principle, rather simple: stick to one of them, install it on ALL the machines and remove the other(s).

    Which one to choose may depends on your requirements: given the poor support for OpenType of most software under most platforms, Linux Libertine G may look an interesting solution, as it offers OpenType-like features; however, support for Graphite is not any wider: as far as I know, only Libre|OpenOffice supports it, among widely used packages.

    Another possible choice is between the "Linux Libertine" version (TrueType, TTF) and the "Linux Libertine O" version (OpenType, OTF), both downloadable from Linux Libertine site. OpenType is commonly reputed a more advanced technology than TrueType, but not many applications support its features (decades after the introduction of the technology!) and I know of OpenType problems for applications based on Qt under Windows. Thus, the TTF version might be a more reliable, albeit conservative, cross-platform solution. It all depends upon the applications you use and your typographic requirements, though.

    Anyway, the important point is: whatever font version you eventually choose, stick to it, use it alone and get rid of other versions; otherwise, you'll face the kind of problems described above.

    Hoping it helps,

    Maurizio