Limit color depth

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2011-04-06
2013-04-29
  • Stephen Rose
    Stephen Rose
    2011-04-06

    I have a machine that only has 2 meg of video memory, but apparently lies about it and says it can do 32 bit color.  Everything works, but there's corruption on the bottom half inch of the display.  Is there any way to limit the color depth to 24 bit instead of 32 bit?  Thanks.

     
  • Imerion
    Imerion
    2011-04-08

    It might be possible to force LCARS24 to run in 24 bit mode (or 16 bit mode), but I'm not sure how. Bill will have to answer that.
    But perhaps you can change graphic settings in the BIOS?
    Another thing that might work is to use UNIVBE and run it before starting LCARS24. It's a DOS video driver working with many old graphic chips. It has helped before when I have had similar problems. I think it's free, so if you search for it you can probably find it.

     
  • Bill Morris
    Bill Morris
    2011-05-01

    LCARS 24 does have drivers for 32-bit mode and selects that depth if the graphics card supports it.  The only thing for the user to try is to start up by typing 800 instead of lcars24. On one Toshiba laptop I have that makes it go to 24-bit color instead of 16-bit.  On a ThinkPad with 1024 x 768 screen display it makes it do 800 x 600 screen display centered within the 1024 x 768 screen.  So in some cases it does affect the color depth. I never made an option for the user to specify the color depth at startup, though.

    Some machines don't support the highest color depth with the largest screen size the graphics card supports, even though that's not mentioned in the documentation. The stated depth will work with some screen sizes but not necessarily all. They''re not  exactly lying, just not going into detail about that.

    Anyway, try typing 800 to start the program. That may solve the problem by using a screen size the machine can actually support in 32-bit mode.

    The Windows version forces 800 x 600 display, which gets around hostile treatment of non-Windows programs.  A lot of DOS games use the same trick to get around Windows' defenses.