Dear Alex,

Your comment and question:

Jar files are just zip files with a different file name extension. If
the code was written in Python, you can't just give those class files to
Java programmers and expect them to carry on.
This is common sense regardless of what languages we're talking about.


I've already experienced situations you described above in your note and this happened within our development team. There use to be fluctuation of manpower mainly regarding the younger work-force. There also exists different cultural backgrounds depending on the location you work. The situation in US might be different as the one in Finland. In US the Python language often is lectured at the Universities as a primary development framework, very useful for educational purpose. Python started in year 1991, while Java came around 1995. At other places like in Brazil, the students are focused to catch global job opportunities which result in the study of  the Java language. Now we have a third trend, which are the dynamically interpreted languages, like PHP, JRuby, Groovy, Python and Jython. They help to streamline the source code (maybe in factor 3), speed up the development through experimentation and consequent use of unit tests. The resulting codes gets more readable, there are features for embedded code deploy and better portability, like for example the capability to run it in a cloud computing environment like the Amazon EC2 or AppEngine. All those dynamic languages are a trend.        


 What we also see is a synergy between the language syntax. I would not be surprised to see pythonic feature to show-up up in the Java 7 syntax. We already see this happing in the Groovy 1.7 (for. ex. closures).  If the syntax solution is good it will propagate into the other languages. Now if you want a really sharp programmer, he will start to learn one of the dynamic languages. To answer your question: How long its takes a coder to dive into such a new technology?  The learning of Python syntax having a Java background will not take more than two month doing self-study in part-time. There is high quality training material available from the jython.org site, also the cookbook from Mr. Dave Kuhlman and the brand new Jython book. The critical point is if a coder is willing to face new technologies and learn it quickly.

 While Java is the COBOL of century 21,  the Jython language is fun (..this counts for me..). People that starts learning it, use to get addicted, its a positive experience. In that sense and with a small training effort, you can expect a Java coder to carry on.

Hope you find the answer for your doubts and it gives you the arguments for motivation of the Java work-force.

Regards,
Claude


Claude Falbriard
Developer
AMS Hortolândia / SP - Brazil
phone:    +55 13 9762 4094
cell:         +55 13 8117 3316
e-mail:    claudef@br.ibm.com



From: Alex Grönholm <alex.gronholm@nextday.fi>
To: "jython-users@lists.sourceforge.net" <jython-users@lists.sourceforge.net>
Date: 04/02/2010 05:02 AM
Subject: Re: [Jython-users] Decompiling .jar files for other coding systems





2.4.2010 4:33, Tim Johnson kirjoitti:
> * Alex Grönholm<alex.gronholm@nextday.fi>  [100401 12:28]:
>    
>> 1.4.2010 23:07, Tim Johnson kirjoitti:
>>      
>>> * Alex Grönholm<alex.gronholm@nextday.fi>   [100401 11:27]:
>>>
>>>        
>>>> 1.4.2010 20:56, Tim Johnson kirjoitti:
>>>>
>>>>          
>>>>> FYI:
>>>>> I've been a programmer for over 20 years, 8 of it in python, 12 in
>>>>> C, but I am a total noob when it comes to java.
>>>>>
>>>>> I've played around a little with jar and see that I can extract code
>>>>> from a jar file.
>>>>>
>>>>> Here's the scenario:
>>>>>
>>>>> Suppose I develop a project in jython, I deliver jar files and I
>>>>> become a luddite, get hit by a bus or something and the client can't
>>>>> find another jython programmer.
>>>>>
>>>>> Java programmers are available. How can a java programmer "pick
>>>>> up" after me? Or a clojure programmer or a kawa programmer?
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>            
>>>> Uh, provide the source (.py), not compiled class files?
>>>>
>>>>          
>>>     Suppose the follow-up programmers are *not* python/jypython
>>>     programmers and want nothing to do with python.
>>>
>>>        
>> Well then you are SOL. Because decompiling jython-made class files
>> doesn't give you reasonable java code. Have you tried?
>>      
>   I have done nothing with jython.
>   I ran some jar files from sea monkey as in jar xvf myfile.jar.
>   The output from them is all I have to go on.
>   Thanks
>    
Jar files are just zip files with a different file name extension. If
the code was written in Python, you can't just give those class files to
Java programmers and expect them to carry on.
This is common sense regardless of what languages we're talking about.


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