Steve Litt skrev 2012-04-19 20:04:
Hi Pranav,

That would be true of a from-scratch SVG that's truly a vector graphic,
but I don't think it would be true for an SVG'ized JPG that's basically
an SVG wrapper around a JPG bitmap. I think you mentioned earlier in
this thread that your photos are over a megabyte in size. That should
scale pretty well on everything but the biggest screens.

You never mentioned whether these will be used in a website, a PDF
document, an EPUB book, or something else. Where will they be used?

SteveT

On Thu, 19 Apr 2012 21:43:29 +0530
"Pranav Lal" <pranav.lal@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi nicu,

the images are phhotos. The reason I am converting to SVG is that if I
understand things correctly, it will scale better on a variety of
devices and screen sizes.

Pranav

-----Original Message-----
From: Nicu Buculei [mailto:nicu_gfx@nicubunu.ro] 
Sent: Tuesday, April 17, 2012 1:35 PM
To: Inkscape User Community
Subject: Re: [Inkscape-user] Shrinking the results of JPG to SVG
conversion

On 04/17/2012 09:38 AM, Pranav Lal wrote:
Hi Jon,
<snip
That tells us on how you save the SVG once it had been created, but
not how the SVG was originally done.

The usual way is to use the 'Trace Bitmap' functionality on an
imported jpg and then removing the reference to the jpg.

        
PL] Thanks for your response. The original image is a Jpeg file
which I am opening in inkscape.
If your images are photos, then SVG probably is not the right format
for them, the result will be huge and at a bad quality.
If the images are drawings, then the best is to trace and then
manually adjust the result (or even redraw them - a manual trace).

-- 
nicu :: http://nicubunu.ro :: http://nicubunu.blogspot.com

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First:
http://zombiwoof.deviantart.com/gallery/12392182#/d46z8l2

The image is a SVG file, all vector, but "I" made it, a human. No trace program today can trace a photograph and do it to vector with this quality.

Vektor for webb is mostly logotypes, illustrations that have few colors. Trace photographs to vector can bee a expression, a manner. But they have few colors, like two or a few more
, but not 16,7 million colors as a bitmap can have. If you for example set the trace program to 6 million colors (I don't think it's possible) then you have SVG file with so much code, it's humungous, and for the web browser to read the code, and download it take time, a lot of time.

/Tommy Hjalmarsson