Den Tuesday 19 March 2013 15.57.56 skrev Tim Lyons:

> On 19 Mar 2013, at 13:57, Enno Borgsteede wrote:

> > Like Helge, I don’t fully understand what you meant with your

> > comment about console.

>

> (Actually, I think it was Peter who also asked about the possible

> Console problem). I said that

>

> >> sometimes the console window disappears before you can note what it

> >> says

>

> Helge seems to confirm this may be a problem when he says:

> > but I don't use any of these two versions.

> > I always build my own batch file to control at least GRAMPSHOME. To

> > tell about issues I use my batch to switch Gramps into English to

> > provide better descriptions for issues.

> > And I use always a PAUSE cmd command at the end ;-)

>

> The PAUSE command seems to confirm that the window can close too

> early, confirming that this may be a problem. I am not really bothered

> about whether it is a problem or not, just trying to understand what

> to write in the Wiki.

>

>

> But that wasn't really the point that I wanted guidance on. I wanted

> to understand why there was an icon/menu item that used 'python.exe'

> and another that used 'pythonw.exe'.

>

> I wanted to understand what we should tell Aunt Martha about when to

> use one and when to use the other. I don't necessarily agree that it

> is all pretty obvious to users! It may not need a detailed

> explanation, maybe just a casual mention that "web links to home page

> and bug report, and the uninstaller are included with the normal effect"

>

> Regards,

> Tim.

This is from python manual:

3.3.4. Executing scripts

Python scripts (files with the extension .py) will be executed by python.exe by default. This executable opens a terminal, which stays open even if the program uses a GUI. If you do not want this to happen, use the extension .pyw which will cause the script to be executed by pythonw.exe by default (both executables are located in the top-level of your Python installation directory). This suppresses the terminal window on startup.

Regards,

Peter