Problem restoring to advanced format drive

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Dave
2012-07-13
2012-09-10
  • Dave
    Dave
    2012-07-13

    Hi all, we have G4L RAW mode images for several different models of PCs that
    originally came with pre-advanced format drives and when attempting to restore
    those images onto newer advanced format drives (of the same size, difference
    is AF vs. non-AF), the image fails to get out of sysprep saying that setup
    cannot continue. Switch back to an older non-AF drive, and it is fine.

    Has anyone else run into this problem? Is there any way to get a G4L RAW mode
    image created from a 512k/sector non-AF drive to properly apply to a
    4096k/sector AF drive?

    Thank you, Dave

     
  • Right off the top I would think that it is a driver that is not included in
    the original image.

    Long ago, I did an image of a PATA disk to a SATA disk, and it would not boot?
    It would go thru the initial startup, but then fail to mount the root
    filesystem. The original initrd didn't have the SATA controller, so had to
    manually rebuild the initrd to include the driver on the PATA disk, and then
    put that updated initrd on the SATA disk and it then booted fine.

    I might suggest doing an ntfsclone backup of the non-AF disk, and then restore
    it to one of the already imaged AF disks. That way the mbr and partition info
    is setup. Or you could do an mbr backup and restore it to a new disk.

    Windows does use sector numbers, so that would be greatly different from using
    a 512 byte sector to a 4096 byte sector. Don't know if the ntfsclone restore
    would handle this?

    Had an issue on a classroom of machines long ago, that had 98 as partition 1,
    and XP and Linux on logical partitions within an extended partition. That
    worked fine. Some disks, where larger than others, so created another primary
    partition to use the extra space. 98 and linux had no problems,but the XP
    would not boot since partitions where different. Deleting the partition fixed
    it. The XP partition never changed from /dev/hda5, but adding /dev/hda3 caused
    it not to boot, and it wasn't even a windows formatted partitions.