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#28 Change 'spamicity' to 'bogosity'

closed
nobody
None
5
2004-11-30
2004-11-27
David P James
No

With the change of the default spam state descriptors from
Yes/Unsure/No to Spam/Unsure/Ham filters that make a
simple search for the string 'spam' will result in moving all
messages to the junk bin (or wherever) since 'spam' is in
the word 'spamicity' which is always present. Changing the
word 'spamicity' to 'bogosity' would avoid that potential
dataloss issue.

Discussion

  • David Relson
    David Relson
    2004-11-28

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    David,

    As you say, simply checking for "spam" is a bad idea.
    Having your filter check for "X-Bogosity: Spam" should do
    what you want.

    Alternatively, look at the "header_format" option in
    bogofilter.cf. You can change the text of the "X-Bogosity:"
    line to most anything you want.

     
  • Logged In: YES
    user_id=2788

    I object to changing the defaults again just yet - and the
    default is X-Bogosity. I wonder if you have an obsolete
    bogofilter.cf file lying on the floor that you stumble across.

    Try fewer wildcards, I use /^X-Bogosity: Spam,
    tests=bogofilter/ for instance - that's safe enough and
    works with the bogofilter defaults.

    You can view the defaults with: bogofilter -CQQ

    I'm reclassifying this as feature request, what it is.

     
    • status: open --> closed-rejected
     
  • David P James
    David P James
    2004-11-30

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    Huh? Good grief. I'm using KMail, not procmail. You can't set the
    filters to look for "X-Bogosity" since that is this the name of the
    header. Instead it looks through the contents of the specified
    header. Basically, we can no longer have a KMail filter of the type
    "header 'X-Bogosity' contains 'spam'". Instead we have to have
    one more like "header 'X-Bogosity' matches regexp '\bspam\b'",
    which is a heck of a lot less clear to average users. Hence the
    request to change "spamicity" to "bogosity" as the first would
    become viable again.
    See KDE bug 93040 for more on how this came about.
    http://bugs.kde.org/show_bug.cgi?id=93040

     
  • David P James
    David P James
    2004-11-30

    • status: closed-rejected --> closed
     
  • David Relson
    David Relson
    2004-11-30

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    David,

    Are K-Mail's filters case sensitivity or able to handle
    regexs? "Spam" stars with a capital S, while "spamicity"
    uses lower case. Alternatively, check for "^Spam". Using
    the config file (or command line option), "Spam/Ham/Unsure"
    can be changed to any 3 words you want or "spamicity=..."
    can be change to "score=...".

    The flexibility is there for you to use. Please do so.

    David

     
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    If KMail (which I've never liked BTW because it doesn't allow me to go
    without any local account and it insists on messing with my ~/Mail) does not
    support Header "X-Bogofilter" _BEGINS WITH_ "..." then there's a task
    for you.

     
  • David P James
    David P James
    2004-11-30

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    Mathias:

    Are you intent on destroying goodwill or something? Your first
    comment brought up some red herring of a config file and now
    you seem to be intent on blasting away at KMail. Why the
    resistance to changing the term 'spamicicty' to 'bogosity'?

    Anyway, to answer David, it's not for me - I can put up with
    whatever changes you throw at me. Rather, it's for ease of
    creating automated facilities for setting up KMail to use Bogofilter
    in a way that is no more difficult than using Mozilla's built-in
    filters. Until the recent change this was relatively
    straightforward. Now it has just been made more complex for no
    apparent gain. Yes, regexps can and will be used but the
    simplicity and understandability of a filter that used to only
    contain the word 'yes' has now been lost. Either that or a bunch
    more commandline options have to be used, but again, for no
    apparent gain.

    At any rate, since this is clearly going nowhere I might as well
    stop. But that doesn't change the inherent unwisdom of using
    the string 'spam' in every header line AND using it to denote a
    message that has been found to be spam.

     
  • David Relson
    David Relson
    2004-11-30

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    David,
    There's a good reason to use "Spam/Ham/Unsure" rather than
    "Yes/No/Unsure". Tagging a message as "X-Bogosity: Yes"
    doesn't provide much of a clue to a (human) reader,. Seeing
    "Yes", I'm inclined to ask "Yes to what?" Seeing "Spam" or
    "Ham" is much clearer.

    I don't understand your role wrt kmail? Is it a personal
    matter or are you packaging filter rules for others? The
    format of the X-Bogosity line is "Spam/Ham/Unsure,
    tests=bogofilter, spamicity=0.123455, version=1.2.3". I
    gather that kmail's filtering is case insensitive, so that
    rules out testing for "Spam" (instead of 'spam'). Since
    kmail, can't test for "X-Bogosity: Spam", why not have it
    test for "Spam, tests=bogofilter", which provides enough
    context for a good test? If regexs are allowed, test for
    "Spam.*spamicity".

    HTH,

    David

     
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    David P. James,

    your calling the configuration file red herring is impertinent.

    First and foremost, fix your filter rule.

    A. KMail supports regexp, so match "^spam"
    B. KMail supports contains, match "spam,"
    C. Bogofilter supports configuration file to set the tags, header layout all the
    way you want it if you don't like our defaults.
    D. Bogofilter isn't even released as 1.0, name us ONE reason why we
    should care about dependent package compatibility.

    Now will you stop wasting our time.
    Thank you.