Tag Archives: Project of the Month

February 2016, “Staff Pick” Project of the Month – ProjectLibre

Project Libre LogoFor our January “Staff Pick” Project of the Month, we selected ProjectLibre, an open source replacement of Microsoft Project. Marc O’Brien, ProjectLibre’s co-founder, shared his thoughts about the project’s history, purpose, and direction.

SourceForge (SF): Tell me about the ProjectLibre project please.
ProjectLibre Team: ProjectLibre’s mission is to be the open source replacement of Microsoft Project. Our users can open existing Microsoft Project files in ProjectLibre and you don’t lose any data and it is available on Linux, Mac or Windows.

SF: What made you start this?
ProjectLibre Team: I started the company with our CTO ( Laurent Chreteinneau). We have worked together for many years and had a previous company that we built and was acquired. We were pleased being acquired but it cut short our mission of offering the world an open source alternative to the proprietary offerings like Microsoft Project. The base cost of the product is ~$1,000 but in actuality far exceeds this number. The software stack required to implement for a team requires licenses and CAL’s for Project, ProjectServer, SharePoint, SqlServer, BI and Project Web App. It is costly and complex. Our mission is to provide a free desktop version that can replace their desktop version and a cloud version that is similar to what Google Docs has relating to Word. We are getting ready to launch a cloud version that is simply a login with your browser with collaborative features similar to the Google Apps. Btw, project management is a fascinating discipline with universities now offering Ph.D’s!

SF: Has the original vision been achieved?
ProjectLibre Team: Our vision has been partially achieved. The desktop release of ProjectLibre has been a major success. We have a lot of work to do but ProjectLibre has been downloaded from Sourceforge over 2,000,000 times in over 200 countries. The team is really pleased to see that impact globally. We have organizations like the Clinton Foundation and other NGO’s using ProjectLibre in Africa on projects. There are governments like the Kingdom of Cambodia using ProjectLibre for building out the school system around their country. That brings significant pride to the team as our vision and mission is making a difference! ProjectLibre has been translated into many languages so we are also reaching international users in their native languages. Our cloud version to remove the complexity and cost of the proprietary stack is still a work in progress.

SF: Who can benefit the most from your project?
ProjectLibre Team: Project Management is a horizontal application so it is utilized in a wide variety of industries and governments. ProjectLibre is also being used extensively in many Fortune 500 companies but also globally in many small businesses. We regularly get emails from organizations thanking us for providing open source project management software. The costs for proprietary software in project management is an enormous impact. We give them the opportunity to deploy those costs on core business initiatives.

SF: What core need does ProjectLibre fulfill?
ProjectLibre Team: Managing projects from small initiatives so large complex projects. There are project timelines, Gantt charts, cost management, resource usage and many other items required to effectively deliver a project. ProjectLibre has the full capabilities to deliver comprehensive management of the project to deliver on-time and on-budget.

SF: What’s the best way to get the most out of using ProjectLibre?
ProjectLibre Team: ProjectLibre is similar to Microsoft Project so the learning curve for many people is low. Those that have existing Project files can simply open them in ProjectLibre and keep going. If there are additional training needs there is online documentation and videos on our community website. We also are coming out with a new website this month and want to thank the FFWagency.com and the Drupal community for the assistance! We will continue to have regional community groups on the new website so users can join and participate. Our community is quite active in the groups and discussion forums. We also really enjoy interacting with the community and hearing the user stories.

SF: What has your project team done to help build and nurture your community?
ProjectLibre Team: We designed our current and future website in Drupal with a community orientation. There is a global community group with over 50,000 members but also regional groups our users can join. We have a new website and one of our 2016 resolutions is to really continue engaging the community with blogs, emails, discussions etc!

SF: Have you all found that more frequent releases helps build up your community of users?
ProjectLibre Team: That is a great question. We have been completely re-writing ProjectLibre to a modular architecture. That has unfortunately caused less updates to the old code base than we would like. It is a balancing act as it causes a delay in our overall re-write which everyone is looking forward to getting done. We get lots of requests for integrations and other items. It will be nice later in the year to have frequent releases.

SF: What was the first big thing that happened for your project?
ProjectLibre Team: I can think of a couple of items early on that helped ProjectLibre. The SourceForge team has been really supportive from the start. We have been in the open source space for awhile and that helped promote our initial release. We also received early assistance from Red Hat who hosted our website and community on OpenShift. The FFWagency and Drupal ecosystem also reached out to get our community website up and running. This allowed us to focus on the product.

SF: What helped make that happen?
ProjectLibre Team: The open source community including SourceForge and RedHat are so giving and helpful. It is one of the things that draws me into the other open source communities such as Drupal for instance.

SF: What is the next big thing for ProjectLibre?
ProjectLibre Team: It is interesting I sent the community a message when we hit our 100,000 download milestone. That was big as we knew it would be popular. We then have followed up when we hit 1,000,000 and now 2,000,000. Our next milestone will be the upcoming beta release of our cloud version!

SF: How has SourceForge and its tools helped your project reach that success?
ProjectLibre Team: SourceForge has been wonderful to the ProjectLibre team. Roberto, Rich and the other team members have been encouraging and helpful from the start. It has been a long haul! The ProjectLibre downloads are on Linux, Mac or Windows, the detection of OS has been accurate and assists our community. We also enjoy the download map and statistics both by operating system and countries. As a global traveler, it is wonderful to see the download map on SourceForge as we hit virtually the entire world with downloads.

SF: What is the next big thing for ProjectLibre?
ProjectLibre Team: We are rewriting ProjectLibre with a modular architecture. This should provide a much easier codebase to get community contributions. We are also releasing the cloud based solution that we hope generates our first revenue so we can work full time and accelerate the development. The cloud version is similar to Google Apps as teams can see real time changes while working together.

SF: How long do you think that will take?
ProjectLibre Team: It has been frustrating as we had expected corporate sponsorship from our Fortune 500 user friends. It did not happen so we are well behind schedule and from a project management company is frankly quite upsetting. We are looking to release the cloud version in the first half of the year. If we can then go full time it will compress the other work significantly.

SF: Do you have the resources you need to make that happen?
ProjectLibre Team: It has been a struggle as mentioned. I have so much respect for all the other open source projects that people volunteer and contribute. It is a significant professional and personal sacrifice and when you see the amazing efforts. My co-founder Laurent Chretienneau is amazing with his talent and energy. Having Laurent on the team means we are well set to make it happen :-)

SF: If you had it to do over again, what would you do differently for ProjectLibre?
ProjectLibre Team: We would have looked at the cloud version initially or pursued corporate sponsorship more aggressively to allow us to focus on ProjectLibre entirely.

SF: Is there anything else we should know?
ProjectLibre Team: The team has been fortunate to have worked together for many years. We have a passion for both project management and making a difference in the world. Our way to help is providing free and open source project management software. We have built and sold previous companies. Our commitment internally is to make this a long term effort so we can fulfill our mission. There will be speedbumps for ProjectLibre and our community. Our commitment long term is to continue delivering!

[ Download ProjectLibre ]

“Community Choice” Project of the Month Vote – March 2016

The vote for March 2016 Community Choice SourceForge Project of the Month is now available, and will run until February 15, 2016 12:00 UTC.


Skim

Skim is a PDF reader and note-taker for OS X. It is designed to help you read and annotate scientific papers in PDF, but is also great for viewing any PDF file. Skim requires Mac OS X 10.6 or higher.
[ Download Skim ]


WinPython

WinPython is a free Open Source portable distribution of the Python programming language for Windows XP/7/8, designed for scientists, supporting both 32bit and 64bit versions of Python 2 and Python 3.
[ Download WinPython ]


dispcalGUI

dispcalGUI is a graphical user interface for the display calibration and profiling tools of Argyll CMS, an Open Source color management system. Calibrate and characterize your display devices using one of the many supported hardware sensors, with support for multi-display setups and a variety of available settings like customizable whitepoint, luminance, and tone response curve.  dispcalGUI includes the option to create accurate look-up-table ICC profiles as well as some proprietary 3D LUT formats.
[ Download dispcalGUI ]


The OpenGL Extension Wrangler Library

The OpenGL Extension Wrangler Library is a simple tool that helps C/C++ developers initialize extensions and write portable applications. GLEW currently supports a variety of operating systems, including Windows, Linux, Darwin, Irix, and Solaris.
[ Download The OpenGL Extension Wrangler Library ]


DjVuLibre

DjVu is a web-centric format and software platform for distributing documents and images. DjVuLibre is a Open Source implementation of DjVu, maintained by the original inventors of DjVu.
[ Download DjVuLibre ]


TuxGuitar

TuxGuitar is a multitrack guitar tablature editor and player written in Java-SWT. TuxGuitar can open GuitarPro, PowerTab, and TablEdit files.
[ Download TuxGuitar ]


NetHack

NetHack is a single player dungeon exploration game that runs on a wide variety of computer systems, with a range of graphical and text interfaces, all using the same game engine. Each game presents a different landscape to explore, as the random number generator provides an essentially unlimited number of variations of the dungeon and its inhabitants.
[ Download NetHack ]


Tcl

Tool Command Language (Tcl) is an interpreted language and very portable interpreter for that language. Tcl is embeddable and extensible, and has been widely used since its creation in 1988 by John Ousterhout.
[ Download Tcl ]


SparkyLinux

SparkyLinux is a GNU/Linux distribution created on the “testing” branch of Debian. It features customized lightweight desktops (like E19, LXDE and Openbox), multimedia plugins, selected sets of apps, and its own custom tools to ease different tasks. Sparky is in-between the distros that are beginner-friendly and those that require some amount of Linux knowledge.
[ Download SparkyLinux ]

January 2016, “Staff Pick” Project of the Month – Double Commander

For our January “Staff Pick” Project of the Month, we selected Double Commander, a cross platform file manager with two panels side-by-side. Alexander Koblov, Double Commander’s lead developer, shared his thoughts about the project’s history, purpose, and direction.

SourceForge (SF): Tell me about the Double Commander project please.
Double Commander Team: Double Commander is an Open Source (GPL-2) cross platform (Windows, Linux, OS X, and FreeBSD) twin-panel (commander-style) file manager. It is written using Free Pascal compiler and Lazarus IDE.

SF: What made you start this?
Double Commander Team: I needed an Open Source commander-style file manager that works under Linux and Windows. I like Pascal programming language so I tried to find a file manager written in Pascal. I found three projects but all were Linux only and two were inactive. So I choose one (Seksi Commander) as start point of Double Commander and begin to rewrite code in cross platform way. This was in 2006.

SF: Has the original vision been achieved?
Double Commander Team: Yes, I think. We created a powerful, cross platform file manager. I am using it on daily basis under Linux and Windows at home and work. And I know many people who do same thing.

SF: Who can benefit the most from your project?
Double Commander Team: I think there are several groups who can benefit from it:
– People who likes commander-style file managers :)
– People who need to perform many different operations with files
– People who want to work with files similarly under several operating systems

SF: What core need does Double Commander fulfill?
Double Commander Team: Double Commander allows you to perform all basic operations with files and directories (copy, move, create, delete etc). Plus it can do many advanced operations like group rename, calculate/verify hash, archiving, secure delete and so on. It capabilities can be extended via plugins.

SF: What’s the best way to get the most out of using Double Commander?
Double Commander Team: Use Double Commander in conjunction with plugins.

SF: What has your project team done to help build and nurture your community?
Double Commander Team: We try to make Double Commander backward compatible with previous configuration so in most cases update onto new major release is transparent. I try to support users using email, forum and bug tracker.

SF: Have you all found that more frequent releases helps build up your community of users?
Double Commander Team: More frequent releases are good project advertising and increase program stability. I try to regularly release bug fix updates. But major versions are released once a year. For the year we had one major release and six bug fix releases.

SF: What was the first big thing that happened for your project?
Double Commander Team: Major core rework in 0.5.5 version.

SF: What helped make that happen?
Double Commander Team: A new active and creative developer joined the team—Przemysław Nagay.

SF: What was the net result for that event?
Double Commander Team: We rework Double Commander core. Double Commander became more flexible, extensible and mature. Was added several view modes, (e.g. thumbnails, multicolumn), virtual file systems (archives, network etc).

SF: What is the next big thing for Double Commander?
Double Commander Team: Porting code to new major Free Pascal 3.0 compiler.

SF: How long do you think that will take?
Double Commander Team: I’ve been working on this task several months. I plan to finish it at near time and release new version after Lazarus 1.6 release.

SF: Do you have the resources you need to make that happen?
Double Commander Team: Yes, the only thing that is missing is free time, so the work moves slowly.

SF: If you had it to do over again, what would you do differently for Double Commander?
Double Commander Team: Nothing global.

SF: Is there anything else we should know?
Double Commander Team: I want to say thanks to SourceForge for the infrastructure they give to Open Source projects. It eases Double Commander’s development and support.

[ Download Double Commander ]

January 2016, “Community Choice” Project of the Month – Ditto

For our January “Community Choice” Project of the Month, the community elected Ditto, an extension to the standard windows clipboard that allows you to specify what gets saved. Scott Brogden, Ditto’s lead developer, shared his thoughts about the project’s history, purpose, and direction.

SourceForge (SF): Tell me about the Ditto project please.
Scott Brogden (Brogden): Ditto is a clipboard manager for Windows. It saves data copied to the clipboard and allows you to retrieve that data at a later time. With your previous copies, Ditto can search, paste, edit, export to file, organize, and send clips to others on your network.

SF: What made you start this?
Brogden: A co-worker discussion regarding something we could work on or create revealed we liked the Clipboard Ring in Visual Studio and Visual Assist, except that it only worked in Visual Studio, just like the clipboard in Word only works inside Word. We tried some existing clipboard managers and weren’t impressed, so we created Ditto.

SF: Has the original vision been achieved?
Brogden: Definitely, the original vision was to save copies and be able to search and paste those clips. This was achieved pretty quickly.

SF: Who can benefit the most from your project?
Brogden: Anyone that works with text can benefit from Ditto. I work in Visual Studio all day and constantly use Ditto. My wife works in Excel, Word, and Outlook and uses Ditto to paste clips she has saved.

SF: What core need does Ditto fulfill?
Brogden: Ditto easily saves and retrieves data.

SF: What’s the best way to get the most out of using Ditto?
Brogden: Copy and paste data as you normally would, Ditto will save this data. Then, you can go back and search and find something that you copied last week or last month.

I like to organize some of my most used clips into categories so I can easily get to them with a shortcut key. A coworker told me he doesn’t want to think about it that much, he knows he copied it at some point so he searches and finds it.

SF: What has your project team done to help build and nurture your community?
Brogden: Ditto’s forums on SourceForge are fairly active.  There are a couple posts a day asking for advice or reporting bugs. This is my main interaction with the community.

SF: Have you all found that more frequent releases helps build up your community of users?
Brogden: Yes there are always more downloads and interaction after releasing a new version. This is something I should do more of. The last couple years I have been releasing one to two a year. I post “nightly builds” at http://ditto-cp.sourceforge.net/beta/.  After I’ve completed each small feature, I post the changes and point the latest update to forum members.

SF: What was the first big thing that happened for your project?
Brogden: Placing Ditto on SourceForge. Ditto was functional but needed some polishing. I was the only one working on Ditto and needed some help. After placing Ditto on SourceForge, Kevin Edwards came on board for a while and really got Ditto going, optimizing the UI and adding some much needed features.

SF: What helped make that happen?
Brogden: SourceForge and Open Source.

SF: What was the net result for that event?
Brogden: Ditto is where it is today.

SF: What is the next big thing for Ditto?
Brogden: I don’t have any large fundamental changes that I want to make to Ditto, just some smaller enhancements and optimizations. I keep saying I’m going to make all keyboard actions customizable by the end user.

SF: How long do you think that will take?
Brogden: Now you sound like my project manager at work. Can I get an estimate and a design doc together? Just kidding. Not much, just need to find some motivation and a solid chunk of time.

SF: Do you have the resources you need to make that happen?
Brogden: Well it’s just me making the changes now.

SF: If you had it to do over again, what would you do differently for Ditto?
Brogden: I would not put clips into categories; instead, I would use tags.

SF: Why?
Brogden: Categories are so confining and clips can only be in one category. I would do more of a tag-based system so clips can have multiple tags, something more dynamic.

SF: Any reason you can’t do that now?
Brogden: No reason, for the most part categories give me what I need, so I don’t really see a need to redo this just to get a little more functionality out of it.

[ Download Ditto ]

“Community Choice” Project of the Month Vote – February 2016

The vote for February 2016 Community Choice SourceForge Project of the Month is now available, and will run until January 15, 2016 12:00 UTC.


UltraDefrag

UltraDefrag is a disk defragmenter for Windows, which supports defragmentation of locked system files by running during the boot process. It is easy to use, without any complicated scripting or a huge load of configuration settings. You can filter the files processed by size, number of fragments, file name, and path. You can also terminate the process early by specifying an execution time limit.
[ Download UltraDefrag ]


K-Meleon

K-Meleon is a fast and customizable web browser that can be used instead of Internet Explorer on Windows. Powered by the same Gecko engine as the Firefox and Mozilla browsers, K-Meleon provides users with a secure browsing experience.
[ Download K-Meleon ]


NamelessROM

The main goal of NamelessRom is to provide quality development for Android devices, phones, and tablets alike. NamelessRom developers are available nearly 24/7 and respond to bug reports and feature requests almost instantly.
[ Download NamelessROM ]


Roundcube Webmail

Roundcube Webmail is a browser-based, multilingual IMAP client, with an application-like user interface. Roundcube provides the full functionality you’d expect from an email client, including MIME support, address book, folder manipulation, message searching, and spell check. Roundcube is written in PHP and JavaScript.
[ Download Roundcube Webmail ]


MediaPortal

MediaPortal turns your PC into a very advanced MediaCenter and HTPC. It allows you to listen to your favorite music and radio, watch and store your videos and DVDs, view, schedule and record live TV as a digital video recorder, and much more.
[ Download MediaPortal ]


Equalizer APO

Equalizer APO is a parametric/graphic equalizer for Windows. It is implemented as an Audio Processing Object (APO) for the system effect infrastructure introduced with Windows Vista. It features a virtually unlimited number of filters, works on any number of channels, has low CPU usage, has a modular graphical user interface, and is very low latency which makes it well suited for interactive applications.
[ Download Equalizer APO ]


Bodhi Linux

Bodhi is a minimalistic, enlightened, Linux desktop.
[ Download Bodhi Linux ]


SMPlayer

SMPlayer is a media player for Windows and Linux, with built-in codecs that can also play and download Youtube videos. It also remembers the settings of all files you play, so you can leave a video and later resume at the same point you left it, and with the same settings: audio track, subtitles, volume, etc. SMPlayer also features the ability to download subtitles.
[ Download SMPlayer ]


fldigi

Fldigi is a modem program for most of the digital modes used by radio amateurs today: CW, PSK, MFSK, RTTY, Hell, DominoEX, Olivia, and Throb are all supported. It can help calibrate a sound card to a time signal and do frequency measurement tests.
[ Download fldigi ]